Electrical Engineering

DEGREES OFFERED

  • Master of Science (Electrical Engineering)
  • Doctor of Philosophy (Electrical Engineering)

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Electrical Engineering Department offer the degrees Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in  Electrical Engineering. These degree programs demand academic rigor and depth yet also address real-world problems.

The Departments have four areas of research activity that stem from the core fields of Electrical Engineering: (1) Antennas and Wireless Communications, (2) Information and Systems Science and (3) Energy Systems and Power Electronics. In many cases, individual research projects encompass more than one research area.

Research Areas:

Antennas and Wireless Communications research areas include electromagnetics, antennas, microwave, and wireless communications. Applications address current academic, industry, and society needs. Examples include the design of antennas, antenna arrays, and microwave RF devices for communication and sensing applications.

Information and Systems Sciences is an interdisciplinary research area that encompasses the fields of control systems, communications, signal and image processing, compressive sensing, robotics, and mechatronics. Focus areas include intelligent and learning control systems, fault detection and system identification, computer vision and pattern recognition, sensor development, mobile manipulation and autonomous systems. Applications can be found in renewable energy and power systems, materials processing, sensor and control networks, bio-engineering, intelligent structures, and geosystems.

Energy Systems and Power Electronics is focused on both fundamental and applied research in the interrelated fields of conventional electric power systems and electric machinery, renewable energy and distributed generation, energy economics and policy issues, power quality, power electronics and drives. The overall scope of research encompasses a broad spectrum of electrical energy applications including investor-owned utilities, rural electric associations, manufacturing facilities, regulatory agencies, and consulting engineering firms.

Primary Contact

Lori Sisneros
303-273-3658
sisneros@mines.edu

Professor and Department Head

Atef Elershbeni

Professors

Randy Haupt

P.K. Sen

Marcelo Simoes

Tyrone Vincent

Associate professors

Kathryn Johnson

Salman Mohagheghi

Michael Wakin

Assistant professors

Payam Nayeri

Gongguo Tang

Teaching Professors

Abdul Arkadan

Vibhuti Dave

Jeff Schowalter

Teaching Associate Professors

Stephanie Claussen

Chris Coulston

Research Professor

Mohammed Hadi

Emerita Professor

Catherine Skokan

Emeritus Professor

Ravel Ammerman

Program Details

The Electrical Engineering Department offers the degrees Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering. The master's program is designed to prepare candidates for careers in industry or government or for further study at the Ph.D. level; both thesis and non-thesis options are available. The Ph.D. degree program is sufficiently flexible to prepare candidates for careers in industry, government, or academia. See the information that follows for full details on these four degrees.

Combined Program: The Electrical Engineering Department also offers combined BS/MS degree programs in three different tracks: (a) Information and Systems Sciences, (b) Energy Systems and Power Electronics, and (c) Antennas and Wireless Communications. These programs offer an expedited graduate school application process and allow students to begin graduate coursework while still finishing their undergraduate degree requirements. This program is described in the undergraduate catalog and is in place for Electrical Engineering students. The Physics combined program (B.S. in Engineering Physics and M.S. in EE) also offers similar tracks in Electrical Engineering. Details on this program can be found in the Mines undergraduate catalog, and course schedules for this program can be obtained in both the Physics and EE Departments.

Prerequisites

Requirements for Admission to EE: The minimum requirements for admission to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering are:

  • A baccalaureate degree in engineering, computer science, a physical science, or math with a grade-point average of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale.
  • Graduate Record Examination (Quantitative section) score of 151 or higher (or 650 on the old scale). Applicants who have graduated with an engineering degree from CSM within the past five years are not required to submit GRE scores.
  • TOEFL score of 79 or higher (or 550 for the paper-based test or 213 for the computer-based test) for applicants whose native language is not English. In lieu of a TOEFL score, and IELTS score of 6.5 or higher will be accepted.
  • For the Ph.D. program, prior research experience is desired but not required.

Admitted Students: The EE Department Graduate Committee may require that an admitted student take undergraduate remedial coursework to overcome technical deficiencies. The committee will decide whether to recommend regular or provisional admission.

Transfer Courses: Graduate level courses taken at other universities for which a grade equivalent to a "B" or better was received will be considered for transfer credit with approval of the Advisor and/or Thesis Committee, and EE Department Head, as appropriate.  Transfer credits must not have been used as credit toward a Bachelor degree. For the M.S. degree, no more than nine credits may transfer. For the Ph.D. degree, up to 24 credit hours may be transferred. In lieu of transfer credit for individual courses, students who enter the Ph.D. program with a thesis-based master's degree from another institution may transfer up to 36 hours in recognition of the course work and research completed for that degree.

400-level Courses: As stipulated by the Mines Graduate School, students may apply toward graduate degree requirements a maximum of nine (9.0) semester hours of department-approved 400-level course work.

Advisor and Thesis Committee: Students must have an Advisor from the EE faculty to direct and monitor their academic plan, research, and independent studies. Advisors must be full-time permanent members of the faculty. In this context, full-time permanent members of the faculty are those that hold the rank of professor, associate professor, assistant professor, research professor, associate research professor or assistant research professor. Upon approval by the Graduate Dean, adjunct faculty, teaching faculty, visiting professors, emeritus professors and off-campus representatives may be designated additional co-advisors. A list of EE faculty by rank is available in the faculty tab in the catalog.

Master of Science (thesis option) students must have at least three members on their Thesis Committee; the Advisor and one other member must be permanent faculty in the EE Department. Students who choose to have a minor program must select a representative from the minor area of study to serve on the Thesis Committee.
Ph.D. Thesis Committees must have at least four members; the Advisor and two additional members must be permanent faculty in the EE Department, and one member must be outside the departmental faculty and serving as chair of the committee. Students who choose to have a minor program must select a representative from the minor area of study to serve on the Thesis Committee.

Degree Audit and Admission to Candidacy: All degree students must submit required forms by the deadlines posted by the Office of Graduate Studies 

Master students must complete the Degree Audit form by the posted deadline.
Ph.D. students need to submit the Degree Audit form by the posted deadline and need to submit the Admission to Candidacy form by the first day of the semester in which they want to be considered eligible for reduced registration.

Time Limit: As stipulated by the Mines Graduate School, a candidate for a Masters degree must complete all requirements for the degree within five years of the date of admission into the degree program. A candidate for a doctoral degree must complete all requirements for the degree within nine years of the date of admission into the degree program.

Program Requirements

Master of Science – Electrical Engineering

The M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering (Thesis or Non-Thesis Option) requires 30 credit hours. Requirements for the thesis M.S. are 24 hours of coursework and six credit hours of thesis research. The non-thesis option requires 30 credit hours of coursework. A maximum of six credit hours of  Independent Study can be used to fulfill degree requirements. There are three tracks in Electrical Engineering: (1) Antennas and Wireless Communications (AWC), (2) Energy Systems and Power Electronics (EPSE), and (3) Information and Systems Sciences (ISS). Students are encouraged to decide between tracks before pursuing an advanced degree. Students are also encouraged to speak to their Advisor and/or a member of the EE faculty before registering for classes and to select a permanent Advisor as soon as possible. The following set of courses is required of all students.

M.S. Thesis - Electrical Engineering

EENG707GRADUATE THESIS / DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT6.0
EE CORE: EE Core Courses (AWC track)9.0
EE CORE: EE Core Courses (ESPE track)9.0
EE CORE: EE Core Courses (ISS track)12.0
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Technical Electives must be approved by Thesis Committee
EE TECH: EE Technical Electives (AWC track)15.0
EE TECH: EE Technical Electives (ESPE track)15.0
EE TECH: EE Technical Electives (ISS track)12.0

M.S. Thesis Defense: At the conclusion of the M.S. (Thesis Option), the student will be required to make a formal presentation and defense of her/his thesis research.

M.S. Non-Thesis - Electrical Engineering

EE CORE: EE Core Courses (AWC track) 9.0
EE CORE: EE Core Courses (ESPE track) 9.0
EE CORE: EE Core Courses (ISS track) 12.0
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Technical Electives must be approved by Advisor
EE TECH: EE Technical Electives (AWC track)15.0
EE TECH: EE Technical Electives (ESPE track) 15.0
EE TECH: EE Technical Electives (ISS track)12.0
EE Electives (all tracks) Must be taught by an approved faculty member in EE6.0


Doctor of Philosophy – Electrical Engineering
The Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering requires 72 credit hours of course work and research credits. A minimum of 36 credit hours of course work and a minimum of 24 credit hours of research is required. The remaining 12 credit hours required can be earned through research or coursework and students should consult with their Advisor and/or Thesis Committee. There are three tracks in Electrical Engineering: (1) Antennas and Wireless Communications (AWC), (2) Energy Systems and Power Electronics (ESPE), and (3) Information and Systems Sciences (ISS). Students are encouraged to decide between tracks before pursuing an advanced degree. Students are also encouraged to speak to their Advisor and/or a member of the EE faculty before registering for classes and to select a permanent Advisor as soon as possible. The following set of courses is required of all students.

EENG707GRADUATE THESIS / DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT24.0
EE CORE: EE Core Courses (AWC track)9.0
EE CORE: EE Core Courses (ESPE track) 9.0
EE CORE: EE Core Courses (ISS track)12.0
EE Technical Electives Technical Electives must be approved by Thesis Committee
EE TECH: EE Technical Electives (AWC track)27.0
EE TECH: EE Technical Electives (ESPE track)27.0
EE TECH: EE Technical Electives (ISS track)24.0

Ph.D. Qualifying Examination: Students wishing to enroll in the Electrical Engineering Ph.D. program will be required to pass a Qualifying Exam.  Normally, full-time Ph.D. candidates will take the Qualifying Exam in their first year, but it must be taken within four semesters of entering the program.  Part-time candidates will normally be expected to take the Qualifying Exam within no more than six semesters of entering the program. 

The purpose of the Qualifying Exam is to assess some of the attributes expected of a successful Ph.D. student, including:

  • To determine the student's ability to review, synthesize and apply fundamental concepts.
  • To determine the creative and technical potential of the student to solve open-ended and challenging problems.
  • To determine the student's technical communication skills. 

The Qualifying Examination includes both written and oral sections. The written section is based on material from the EE Department’s undergraduate Electrical Engineering degree. The oral part of the exam covers one or more papers from the literature chosen by the student and the student's Advisor.  The student's Advisor and two additional Electrical Engineering faculty members (typically from the student's Thesis Committee representing their track) administer the oral exam.

Ph.D. Qualifying exams will be held each spring semester.  In the event of a student failing the Qualifying exam, she/he will be given one further opportunity to pass the exam in the following spring semester. If a second failure occurs, the student has unsatisfactory academic performance that results in an immediate, mandatory dismissal of the graduate student from the Ph.D. program.

Ph.D. Thesis Proposal: After passing the Qualifying Examination, the Ph.D. student is allowed up to 18 months to prepare a written Thesis Proposal and present it formally to the student’s graduate committee and other interested faculty.

Admission to Candidacy:  In addition to the Graduate School requirements, full-time students must complete the following requirements within two calendar years of enrolling in the Ph.D. program.

  • Have a Thesis Committee appointment form on file in the Graduate Office:
  • Have passed the Ph.D. Qualifying Exam demonstrating adequate preparation for, and satisfactory ability to conduct doctoral research. 

Ph.D. Thesis Defense: At the conclusion of the student’s Ph.D. program, the student will be required to make a formal presentation and defense of her/his thesis research.

Electrical Engineering Courses

Required Core:  Antennas and Wireless Communications Track

All students must take three of the following five core courses.

EENG525ANTENNAS3.0
EENG526ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETICS3.0
EENG527WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS3.0
EENG528COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROMAGNETICS3.0
EENG530PASSIVE RF & MICROWAVE DEVICES3.0

Required Core:  Energy Systems and Power Electronics Track

All students must take three of the following four core courses.

EENG570ADVANCED HIGH POWER ELECTRONICS3.0
EENG580POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS ENGINEERING3.0
EENG581POWER SYSTEM OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT3.0
EENG583ADVANCED ELECTRICAL MACHINE DYNAMICS3.0
Under special circumstances, substitutions can be made with the approval of the student's advisor

Required Core:  Information and Systems Sciences Track

All students must take:

EENG515MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS3.0

and choose at least three of the following:

EENG509SPARSE SIGNAL PROCESSING3.0
EENG511CONVEX OPTIMIZATION AND ITS ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS3.0
EENG517THEORY AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED CONTROL SYSTEMS3.0
EENG519ESTIMATION THEORY AND KALMAN FILTERING3.0
EENG527WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS3.0
EGGN589DESIGN AND CONTROL OF WIND ENERGY SYSTEMS3.0
MEGN544ROBOT MECHANICS: KINEMATICS, DYNAMICS, AND CONTROL3.0

The Electrical Engineering Department has approved the use of double-counting courses for students enrolled in the combined degree program and details can be found under Graduate Programs at https://electrical.mines.edu

Courses

EENG504. ENGINEERING SYSTEMS SEMINAR - ELECTRICAL. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with EGGN504E,
(I, II) This is a seminar forum for graduate students to present their research projects, critique others? presentations, understand the breadth of engineering projects both within their specialty area and across the Division, hear from leaders of industry about contemporary engineering as well as socio-economical and marketing issues facing today?s competitive global environment. In order to improve communication skills, each student is required to present a seminar in this course before his/her graduation from the Engineering graduate program. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1 hour seminar, 1 semester hour. Repeatable; maximum 1 hour granted toward degree requirements.

EENG507. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER VISION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CSCI507,CSCI512,EENG512,EGGN512,
(I) Computer vision is the process of using computers to acquire images, transform images, and extract symbolic descriptions from images. This course provides an introduction to this field, covering topics in image formation, feature extraction, location estimation, and object recognition. Design ability and hands-on projects will be emphasized, using popular software tools. The course will be of interest both to those who want to learn more about the subject and to those who just want to use computer imaging techniques. Prerequisites: Undergraduate level knowledge of linear algebra, statistics, and a programming language. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG508. ADVANCED TOPICS IN PERCEPTION AND COMPUTER VISION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CSCI508,
(II) This course covers advanced topics in perception and computer vision, emphasizing research advances in the field. The course focuses on structure and motion estimation, general object detection and recognition, and tracking. Projects will be emphasized, using popular software tools. Prerequisites: EENG507 or CSCI507. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG509. SPARSE SIGNAL PROCESSING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN509,
(II) This course presents a mathematical tour of sparse signal representations and their applications in modern signal processing. The classical Fourier transform and traditional digital signal processing techniques are extended to enable various types of computational harmonic analysis. Topics covered include time-frequency and wavelet analysis, filter banks, nonlinear approximation of functions, compression, signal restoration, and compressive sensing. Prerequisites: EENG411 and EENG515. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG511. CONVEX OPTIMIZATION AND ITS ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) The course focuses on recognizing and solving convex optimization problems that arise in applications in various engineering fields. Covered topics include basic convex analysis, conic programming, duality theory, unconstrained optimization, and constrained optimization. The application part covers problems in signal processing, power and energy, machine learning, control and mechanical engineering, and other fields, with an emphasis on modeling and solving these problems using the CVX package. Offered Spring semester of even years. Prerequisites: EENG311 and EENG511. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG515. MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN515,
(I) An introduction to mathematical methods for modern signal processing using vector space methods. Topics include signal representation in Hilbert and Banach spaces; linear operators and the geometry of linear equations; LU, Cholesky, QR, eigen- and singular value decompositions. Applications to signal processing and linear systems are included throughout, such as Fourier analysis, wavelets, adaptive filtering, signal detection, and feedback control.

EENG517. THEORY AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN517,
(II) This course will introduce and study the theory and design of multivariable and nonlinear control systems. Students will learn to design multivariable controllers that are both optimal and robust, using tools such as state space and transfer matrix models, nonlinear analysis, optimal estimator and controller design, and multi-loop controller synthesis. Spring semester of even years. Prerequisites: EENG417. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG519. ESTIMATION THEORY AND KALMAN FILTERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN519,
(II) Estimation theory considers the extraction of useful information from raw sensor measurements in the presence of signal uncertainty. Common applications include navigation, localization and mapping, but applications can be found in all fields where measurements are used. Mathematic descriptions of random signals and the response of linear systems are presented. The discrete-time Kalman Filter is introduced, and conditions for optimality are described. Implementation issues, performance prediction, and filter divergence are discussed. Adaptive estimation and nonlinear estimation are also covered. Contemporary applications will be utilized throughout the course. Offered spring semester of odd years. Prerequisites: EENG515 and undergraduate knowledge of probability theory. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG525. ANTENNAS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) This course provides an in depth introduction to the analysis and synthesis of antennas and antenna arrays. Students are expected to use MATLAB to model antennas and their performance. An extensive final project that involves experimental or computer demonstrations is required. EENG525 has more depth and required work than EENG425. EENG525 students will have one additional problem for each homework assignment, one additional problem on exam, more difficult paper to review and present, and higher expectations on antenna and direction finding projects. Prerequisites: EGGN386 or GPGN302 or PHGN384. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG526. ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) In this course the fundamental theorems of electromagnetics are developed rigorously. Wave solutions are developed in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinate systems for bounded and unbounded regions. Prerequisite: EENG386. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG527. WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EENG513,EGGN513,
(I, II) This course provides the tools needed to analyze and design a wireless system. Topics include link budgets, satellite communications, cellular communications, handsets, base stations, modulation techniques, RF propagation, coding, and diversity. Students are expected to complete an extensive final project. EENG527 has more depth and required work than EENG427. EENG527 students will have one additional problem for each homework assignment, one additional problem on exam, more difficult paper to review and present, and higher expectations on final project. Prerequisites: EENG386, EENG311, and EENG388. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

EENG528. COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROMAGNETICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course provides the basic formulation and numerical solution for static electric problems based on Laplace, Poisson and wave equations and for full wave electromagnetic problems based on Maxwell?s equations. Variation principles methods, including the finite-element method and method of moments will be introduced. Field to circuit conversion will be discussed via the transmission line method. Numerical approximations based on the finite difference and finite difference frequency domain techniques will also be developed for solving practical problems. Prerequisite: EENG386. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG529. ACTIVE RF & MICROWAVE DEVICES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This course introduces the basics of active radio-frequency (RF) and microwave circuits and devices which are the building blocks of modern communication and radar systems. The topics that will be studied are RF and microwave circuit components, resonant circuits, matching networks, noise in active circuits, switches, RF and microwave transistors and amplifiers. Additionally, mixers, oscillators, transceiver architectures, RF and monolithic microwave integrated circuits (RFICs and MMICs) will be introduced. Moreover, students will learn how to model active devices using professional CAD software, how to fabricate printed active microwave devices, how a vector network analyzer (VNA) operates, and how to measure active RF and microwave devices using VNAs. Prerequisites: EEBG385. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG530. PASSIVE RF & MICROWAVE DEVICES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course introduces the basics of passive radio-frequency (RF) and microwave circuits and devices which are the building blocks of modern communication and radar systems. The topics that will be studied are microwave transmission lines and waveguides, microwave network theory, microwave resonators, power dividers, directional couplers, hybrids, RF/microwave filters, and phase shifters. Students will also learn how to design and analyze passive microwave devices using professional CAD software. Moreover, students will learn how to fabricate printed passive microwave devices and test them using a vector network analyzer. Prerequisites: EENG386. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG570. ADVANCED HIGH POWER ELECTRONICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN585,
(I) Basic principles of analysis and design of circuits utilizing high power electronics. AC/DC, DC/AC, AC/AC, and DC/DC conversion techniques. Laboratory project comprising simulation and construction of a power electronics circuit. Prerequisites: EENG385; EENG389 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall semester even years.

EENG571. MODERN ADJUSTABLE SPEED ELECTRIC DRIVES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN581,
An introduction to electric drive systems for advanced applications. The course introduces the treatment of vector control of induction and synchronous motor drives using the concepts of general flux orientation and the feedforward (indirect) and feedback (direct) voltage and current vector control. AC models in space vector complex algebra are also developed. Other types of drives are also covered, such as reluctance, stepper-motor and switched-reluctance drives. Digital computer simulations are used to evaluate such implementations. Pre-requisite: Familiarity with power electronics and power systems, such as covered in EENG480 and EENG470. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Spring semester of even years.

EENG572. RENEWABLE ENERGY AND DISTRIBUTED GENERATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN582,
A comprehensive electrical engineering approach on the integration of alternative sources of energy. One of the main objectives of this course is to focus on the inter-disciplinary aspects of integration of the alternative sources of energy which will include most common and also promising types of alternative primary energy: hydropower, wind power, photovoltaic, fuel cells and energy storage with the integration to the electric grid. Pre-requisite: It is assumed that students will have some basic and broad knowledge of the principles of electrical machines, thermodynamics, power electronics, direct energy conversion, and fundamentals of electric power systems such as covered in basic engineering courses plus EENG480 and EENG470. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Fall semester of odd years.

EENG573. ELECTRIC POWER QUALITY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN580,
(II) Electric power quality (PQ) deals with problems exhibited by voltage, current and frequency that typically impact end-users (customers) of an electric power system. This course is designed to familiarize the concepts of voltage sags, harmonics, momentary disruptions, and waveform distortions arising from various sources in the system. A theoretical and mathematical basis for various indices, standards, models, analyses techniques, and good design procedures will be presented. Additionally, sources of power quality problems and some remedies for improvement will be discussed. The course bridges topics between power systems and power electronics. Prerequisite: EENG480 and EENG470. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.

EENG580. POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN584,
This course deals with the theory and applications of problems and solutions as related to electric power distribution systems engineering from both ends: end-users like large industrial plants and electric utility companies. The primary focus of this course in on the medium voltage (4.16 kV ? 69 kV) power systems. Some references will be made to the LV power system. The course includes per-unit methods of calculations; voltage drop and voltage regulation; power factor improvement and shunt compensation; short circuit calculations; theory and fundamentals of symmetrical components; unsymmetrical faults; overhead distribution lines and power cables; basics and fundamentals of distribution protection. Prerequisites: EENG480 or equivalent. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Fall semester of odd years.

EENG581. POWER SYSTEM OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN587,
(I) This course presents a comprehensive exposition of the theory, methods, and algorithms for Energy Management Systems (EMS) in the power grid. It will focus on (1) modeling of power systems and generation units, (2) methods for dispatching generating resources, (3) methods for accurately estimating the state of the system, (4) methods for assessing the security of the power system, and (5) an overview of the market operations in the grid. Prerequisite: EENG480. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.

EENG582. HIGH VOLTAGE AC AND DC POWER TRANSMISSION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN586,
This course deals with the theory, modeling and applications of HV and EHV power transmission systems engineering. The primary focus is on overhead AC transmission line and voltage ranges between 115 kV ? 500 kV. HVDC and underground transmission will also be discussed. The details include the calculations of line parameters (RLC); steady-state performance evaluation (voltage drop and regulation, losses and efficiency) of short, medium and long lines; reactive power compensation; FACTS devices; insulation coordination; corona; insulators; sag-tension calculations; EMTP, traveling wave and transients; fundamentals of transmission line design; HV and EHV power cables: solid dielectric, oil-filled and gas-filled; Fundamentals of DC transmission systems including converter and filter. Prerequisites: EENG480 or equivalent. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Fall semester of even years.

EENG583. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL MACHINE DYNAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN583,
This course deals primarily with the two rotating AC machines currently utilized in the electric power industry, namely induction and synchronous machines. The course is divided in two halves: the first half is dedicated to induction and synchronous machines are taught in the second half. The details include the development of the theory of operation, equivalent circuit models for both steady-state and transient operations, all aspects of performance evaluation, IEEE methods of testing, and guidelines for industry applications including design and procurement. Prerequisites: EENG480 or equivalent. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Spring semester of even years.

EENG584. POWER SYSTEM RISK MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This course presents a comprehensive exposition of the theory, methods, and algorithms for risk management in the power grid. The course will focus on: (1) power system stability analysis (steady state, dynamic, and transient), (2) analysis of internal and external threats to power systems, e.g. component failures, faults, natural hazards, cyber intrusions, (3) introduction to power system security assessment, (4) fundamentals of modeling risk, vulnerability assessment and loss calculations, (5) mitigating techniques before, during and after the course of major events and disturbances. Prerequisites: EENG480, EENG481. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Years to be Offered: Every Other Year.

EENG586. COMMUNICATION NETWORKS FOR POWER SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Advanced topics on communication networks for power systems including the fundamentals of communication engineering and signal modulation/transfer, physical layer for data transfer (e.g., wireline, wireless, fiber optics), different communication topologies for power networks (e.g., client-server, peer-to-peer), fundamentals of SCADA system, data modeling and communication services for power system applications, common protocols for utility and substation automation, and cyber-security in power networks. Prerequisites: EENG480. 3 hours of lecture; 3 credit hours. Fall, odd years.

EENG587. POWER SYSTEMS PROTECTION AND RELAYING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Theory and practice of power system protection and relaying; Study of power system faults and symmetrical components; Fundamental principles and tools for system modeling and analysis pertaining to relaying, and industry practices in the protection of lines, transformers, generators, motors, and industrial power systems; Introduction to microprocessor based relaying, control, and SCADA. Prerequisites: EENG389. 3 hours of lecture; 3 credit hours. Spring, odd years.

EENG588. ENERGY POLICY, RESTRUCTURING AND DEREGULATION OF ELECTRICITY MARKET. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

The big picture of electric power, electricity and energy industry; Restructuring and Deregulation of electricity market; Energy Policy Acts and its impact on electricity market and pricing; Energy economics and pricing strategy; Public policy issues, reliability and security; Regulation. Prerequisites: EENG389. 3 hours of lecture; 3 credit hours. Fall, odd years.

EENG589. DESIGN AND CONTROL OF WIND ENERGY SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN589,
(II) Wind energy provides a clean, renewable source for electricity generation. Wind turbines provide electricity at or near the cost of traditional fossil-fuel fired power plants at suitable locations, and the wind industry is growing rapidly as a result. Engineering R&D can still help to reduce the cost of energy from wind, improve the reliability of wind turbines and wind farms, and help to improve acceptance of wind energy in the public and political arenas. This course will provide an overview of the design and control of wind energy systems. Offered Spring semester of odd years. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once, but no more than twice for the same course content. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit: 0 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

EENG599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit: 0.5 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different topics/experience and maximums vary by department. Contact the Department for credit limits toward the degree.

EENG617. INTELLIGENT CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN617,
Fundamental issues related to the design on intelligent control systems are described. Neural networks analysis for engi neering systems are presented. Neural-based learning, estimation, and identification of dynamical systems are described. Qualitative control system analysis using fuzzy logic is presented. Fuzzy mathematics design of rule-based control, and integrated human-machine intelligent control systems are covered. Real-life problems from different engineering systems are analyzed. Prerequisite: EENG517. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Taught on demand.

EENG618. NONLINEAR AND ADAPTIVE CONTROL. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN618,
This course presents a comprehensive exposition of the theory of nonlinear dynamical systems and the applications of this theory to adaptive control. It will focus on (1) methods of characterizing and understanding the behavior of systems that can be described by nonlinear ordinary differential equations, (2) methods for designing controllers for such systems, (3) an introduction to the topic of system identification, and (4) study of the primary techniques in adaptive control, including model-reference adaptive control and model predictive control. Prerequisite: EENG517. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring, even numbered years.

EENG683. COMPUTER METHODS IN ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN583,
This course deals with the computer methods and numerical solution techniques applied to large scale power systems. Primary focus includes load flow, short circuit, voltage stability and transient stability studies and contingency analysis. The details include the modeling of various devices like transformer, transmission lines, FACTS devices, and synchronous machines. Numerical techniques include solving a large set of linear or non-linear algebraic equations, and solving a large set of differential equations. A number of simple case studies (as per IEEE standard models) will be performed. Prerequisites: EENG583, EENG580 and EENG582 or equivalent; a strong knowledge of digital simulation techniques. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Taught on demand.

EENG698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once, but no more than twice for the same course content. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit: 0 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

EENG699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit: 0.5 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different topics/experience and maximums vary by department. Contact the Department for credit limits toward the degree.

EENG707. GRADUATE THESIS / DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT. 1-15 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with EGGN707E,
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the direct supervision of the student's faculty advisor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeatable for credit.