Chemistry

2017-2018

Program Description

Chemistry is the field of science associated with atoms and molecules. It focuses on the behavior and properties of matter, the reactions and transformations that dictate chemical processes, and the creation of new substances. Chemistry is the primary field that deals with nanoscience and nanotechnology. It is often considered the central science, linking the physical sciences with engineering, medicine, and life sciences. The subject of chemistry is typically organized into more focused subdisciplines, including organic chemistry, physical chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, analytical chemistry, theoretical and computational chemistry, and materials chemistry. A degree in chemistry examines these topics to promote a fundamental understanding of the world and an application toward technological problems. Professional chemists apply their knowledge in many different areas ranging from environmental processes to the development of new materials and renewable energy. They work in academic environments, high-tech start-ups, and research and development laboratories associated with practically every advanced technological field including medicine, energy, biotechnology, computing, and agriculture.

The B.S. degree program in chemistry is approved by the American Chemical Society (ACS) and is designed to educate professionals for the varied career opportunities this central scientific discipline affords. The curricula are therefore founded in rigorous fundamental science complemented by application of these principles to the materials, energy, minerals, or environmental fields. For example, specific curricular tracks emphasizing environmental chemistry or biochemistry are offered along with a more flexible chemistry track that can be tailored to optimize preparation consistent with a student's individual career goals. Those aspiring to enter Ph.D. programs in chemistry are strongly advised to include undergraduate research among their elective hours. Others interested in industrial chemistry choose area of special interest courses, for example in chemical engineering or metallurgy. A significant number of students complete degrees in both chemistry and chemical engineering as an excellent preparation for industrial careers.

The instructional and research laboratories located in Coolbaugh Hall are state-of-the-art facilities with modern instrumentation for synthesis and characterization of molecules and materials. Instrumentation includes: gas chromatographs (GC), high-performance liquid chromatographs (HPLC), inductively-coupled-plasma-atomic emission spectrometers (ICP-AES), field-flow fractionation (FFF) equipment, mass spectrometry equipment (MS, GC/MS, GC/MS/MS, PY/MS, PY/GC/MS, SFC/MS, MALDI-TOF), 400 MHz and 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers (NMR), infrared spectrometers (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible (UV) spectrometers, thermogravimetric analyzers (TGA), differential scanning calorimeters (DSC), and others including equipment for microscopy, light scattering, and elemental analysis.  In addition, the campus provides access to the Mines 2,144 core 23 teraflop supercomputer for computational research.

Professors

Mark E. Eberhart

Mark P. Jensen, Grandey University Chair in Nuclear Science & Engineering

Daniel M. Knauss

James F. Ranville

Ryan M. Richards

Bettina M. Voelker

Kim R. Williams

David T. Wu

Associate Professors

Stephen G. Boyes

Matthew C. Posewitz

Alan S. Sellinger

Assistant Professors

Jenifer C. Braley

Svitlana Pylypenko

Brian G. Trewyn

Shubham Vyas

Yongan Yang

Teaching Professors

Renee L. Falconer

Mark R. Seger

Teaching Associate Professors

Edward Dempsey

Angela Sower

Teaching Assistant Professor

Allison G. Caster

Research Professors

Donald L. Macalady

Kent J. Voorhees

Research Assistant Professors

Christopher Cox

Fiona Davies

Yuan Yang

Research Faculty

Jesse Hensley

Bryan Pivovar

Dan Ruddy

Robert Rundberg

Affiliated Faculty

Joseph Meyer, Principle Scientist

Derek Vardon, Research Engineer

Professors Emeriti

Scott W. Cowley

Stephen R. Daniel

Dean W. Dickerhoof

Kenneth W. Edwards

Ronald W. Klusman

Donald Langmuir

Patrick MacCarthy

Michael J. Pavelich

E. Craig Simmons

Thomas R. Wildeman

John T. Williams

Robert D. Witters

Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of Science in Chemistry)

In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives described in the Mines Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the B.S. curricula in chemistry are designed to:

  • Impart mastery of chemistry fundamentals;
  • Develop ability to apply chemistry fundamentals in solving open-ended problems;
  • Impart knowledge of and ability to use modern tools of chemical analysis and synthesis;
  • Develop ability to locate and use pertinent information from the chemical literature;
  • Develop ability to interpret and use experimental data for chemical systems;
  • Develop ability to effectively communicate in both written and oral formats;
  • Prepare students for entry to and success in professional careers;
  • Prepare students for entry to and success in graduate programs; and
  • Prepare students for responsible contribution to society.

Curriculum

The B.S. chemistry curricula, in addition to the strong basis provided by the common core, contain three components: chemistry fundamentals, laboratory and communication skills, and applications courses.

Chemistry fundamentals

  • Analytical chemistry - sampling, method selection, statistical data analysis, error sources, theory of operation of analytical instruments (atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chromatography and other separation methods, electroanalytical methods, and thermal methods), calibration, standardization, stoichiometry of analysis, equilibrium and kinetic principles in analysis.
  • Inorganic chemistry - atomic structure and periodicity, crystal lattice structure, molecular geometry and bonding (VSEPR, Lewis structures, VB and MO theory, bond energies and lengths), metals structure and properties, acid-base theories, main-group element chemistry, coordination chemistry, term symbols, ligand field theory, spectra and magnetism of complexes, organometallic chemistry, and nanomaterials chemistry and design.
  • Organic chemistry - bonding and structure, structure- physical property relationships, reactivity-structure relationships, reaction mechanisms (nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution, addition, elimination, radical reactions, rearrangements, redox reactions, photochemical reactions, and metal-mediated reactions), chemical kinetics, catalysis, major classes of compounds and their reactions, and design of synthetic pathways.
  • Physical chemistry - thermodynamics (energy, enthalpy, entropy, equilibrium constants, free energy, chemical potential, non-ideal systems, standard states, activity, phase rule, phase equilibria, phase diagrams), electrochemistry, kinetic theory (Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, collision frequency, effusion, heat capacity, equipartition of energy), kinetics (microscopic reversibility, relaxation processes, mechanisms and rate laws, collision and absolute rate theories), quantum mechanics (Schroedinger equations, operators and matrix elements, particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor, angular momentum, hydrogen atom, hydrogen wave functions, spin, Pauli principle, LCAO method, MO theory, bonding), spectroscopy (dipole selection rules, rotational spectra, term symbols, atomic and molecular electronic spectra, magnetic spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, multiphoton selection rules, lasers), statistical thermodynamics (ensembles, partition functions, Einstein crystals, Debye crystals), group theory, surface chemistry, X-ray crystallography, electron diffraction, dielectric constants, dipole moments, and elements of computational chemistry.

Laboratory and communication skills

  • Analytical methods - gravimetry, titrimetry, sample dissolution, quantitative spectroscopy, GC, HPLC, GC/MS, potentiometry, NMR, AA, ICP-AES
  • Synthesis techniques - batch reactor assembly, inert-atmosphere manipulations, vacuum line methods, high-temperature methods, high-pressure methods, distillation, recrystallization, extraction, sublimation, chromatographic purification, product identification
  • Physical measurements - refractometry, viscometry, colligative properties, FTIR, NMR
  • Information retrieval - Chemical Abstracts online searching, CA registry numbers, Beilstein, Gmelin, handbooks, organic syntheses, organic reactions, inorganic syntheses, primary sources, ACS Style Guide
  • Reporting - lab notebook, experiment and research reports, technical oral reports
  • Communication - scientific reviews, seminar presentations, publication of research results

Applications

  • Elective courses - application of chemistry fundamentals in chemistry elective courses or courses in another discipline; e.g. chemical engineering, environmental science, materials science
  • Internship - summer or semester experience in an industrial or governmental organization working on real-world problems
  • Undergraduate research - open-ended problem solving in the context of a research project

Degree Requirements (Chemistry Track)

Freshman
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CHGN121PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I  4.0
CSM101FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR  0.5
EPIC151INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN  3.0
GEGN101EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS or CBEN 110  4.0
MATH111CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I  4.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CHGN122PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1)  4.0
LAIS100NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES  4.0
MATH112CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II  4.0
PHGN100PHYSICS I - MECHANICS  4.5
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
17.0
Sophomore
Fallleclabsem.hrs
MATH213CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III4.0 4.0
PHGN200PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS2.04.04.5
CHGN209INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS  3.0
CHGN221ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3.0 3.0
CHGN223ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY 3.01.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
LAIS200HUMAN SYSTEMS  3.0
EBGN201PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS3.0 3.0
CHGN222ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II3.0 3.0
CHGN224ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY 3.01.0
MATH225DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS3.0 3.0
CHGN335INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS3.0 3.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
16.5
Junior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CHGN336ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY3.0 3.0
CHGN337ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 3.01.0
CHGN341INORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3.0 3.0
CHGN351PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I3.03.04.0
CHGN395INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 3.01.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective I3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
18.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CHGN353PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE II3.03.04.0
CHGN323QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS AND APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY1.03.02.0
CHGN428BIOCHEMISTRY3.0 3.0
TECH ELECT Technical Elective*3.0 3.0
TECH ELECT Technical Elective*3.0 3.0
15.0
Summerleclabsem.hrs
CHGN490CHEMISTRY FIELD SESSION 18.06.0
6.0
Senior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective II3.0 3.0
CHGN ELECT Chemistry Elective**  3.0
TECH ELECT Technical Elective*3.0 3.0
TECH ELECT Technical Elective*3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
15.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective III3.0 3.0
CHGN401INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II3.0 3.0
CHGN ELECT Chemistry Elective**  2.0
TECH ELECT Technical Elective*3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
14.0
Total Semester Hrs: 133.5

* Technical Electives are courses in any technical field.  LAIS, PAGN, Military Science, ROTC, McBride and the business courses of EBGN are not accepted technical electives.  Examples of possible electives that will be recommended to students are:

CEEN301FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I3.0
CHGN411APPLIED RADIOCHEMISTRY3.0
CHGN430INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER SCIENCE3.0
CHGN462MICROBIOLOGY3.0
EBGN305FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING3.0
EBGN306MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING3.0
EBGN310ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS3.0
GEGN206EARTH MATERIALS3.0
MATH201PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS3.0
MATH332LINEAR ALGEBRA3.0
MNGN210INTRODUCTORY MINING3.0
MTGN311STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS3.0
PEGN102INTRODUCTION TO PETROLEUM INDUSTRY3.0
PHGN300PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I3.0
PHGN419PRINCIPLES OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS3.0

** Chemistry Electives are non-required courses taught within the Chemistry Department.  In addition, graduate level Chemistry and Geochemistry courses taught within the Department are acceptable. 

CHGN495 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH is taught as a possible chemistry elective.  Those aspiring to enter Ph.D. programs in Chemistry or related fields are strongly advised to include undergraduate research in their curricula.  The objective of CHGN495 is that students successfully perform an open-ended research project under the direction of a Mines faculty member.  Students must demonstrate through the preparation of a proposal, prepared in consultation with the potential faculty research advisor and the CHGN495 instructor, that they qualify for enrollment in CHGN495.

Environmental Chemistry Track

Freshman
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CSM101FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR  0.5
CHGN121PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I  4.0
EPIC151INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN  3.0
GEGN101EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS or CBEN 110  4.0
MATH111CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I  4.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CHGN122PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1)  4.0
LAIS100NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES  4.0
MATH112CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II  4.0
PHGN100PHYSICS I - MECHANICS  4.5
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
17.0
Sophomore
Fallleclabsem.hrs
MATH213CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III4.0 4.0
PHGN200PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS2.04.04.5
CHGN209INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS  3.0
CHGN221ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3.0 3.0
CHGN223ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY 3.01.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
LAIS200HUMAN SYSTEMS  3.0
EBGN201PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS3.0 3.0
CHGN222ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II3.0 3.0
CHGN224ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY 3.01.0
MATH225DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS3.0 3.0
CHGN335INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS3.0 3.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
16.5
Junior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CHGN336ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY3.0 3.0
CHGN337ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY3.01.01.0
CHGN341INORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3.0 3.0
CHGN351PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I3.03.04.0
CHGN395INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH3.01.01.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective I3.0 3.0
CHEV ELECT Environmental Elective**3.0 3.0
18.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CHGN353PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE II3.03.04.0
CHGN323QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS AND APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY1.03.02.0
CHGN428BIOCHEMISTRY3.0 3.0
CHEV ELECT Environmental Elective**3.0 3.0
TECH ELECT Technical Elective*3.0 3.0
15.0
Summerleclabsem.hrs
CHGN490CHEMISTRY FIELD SESSION 18.06.0
6.0
Senior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CHEV ELECT Environmental Elective**3.0 3.0
CHEV ELECT Environmental Elective**3.0 3.0
CHGN ELECTChemistry Elective**3.0 3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective II3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
15.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CHGN410SURFACE CHEMISTRY3.0 3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective III3.0 3.0
CHGN403INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY3.0 3.0
CHGN ELECT Chemistry Elective**  2.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
14.0
Total Semester Hrs: 133.5

* Technical Electives are courses in any technical field. LAIS, PAGN, Military Science and ROTC, McBride and the business courses of EBGN are not accepted technical electives. 

** Chemistry Electives are non-required courses taught within the Chemistry Department.  In addition, graduate level Chemistry and Geochemistry courses taught within the Department are acceptable. 

Environmental Electives are courses that are directly or indirectly related to Environmental Chemistry.  Examples include environmental CEEN courses and CHGN462 Microbiology.  Students can consult their advisors for further clarification.

CHGN495 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH is taught as a possible chemistry elective.  Those aspiring to enter Ph.D. programs in Chemistry or related fields are strongly advised to include undergraduate research in their curricula.  The objective of CHGN495 is that students successfully perform an open-ended research project under the direction of a Mines faculty member.  Students must demonstrate through the preparation of a proposal, prepared in consultation with the potential faculty research advisor and the CHGN495 instructor, that they qualify for enrollment in CHGN495.

Biochemistry Track

Freshman
Fallleclabsem.hrs
MATH111CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I  4.0
CSM101FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR  0.5
CBEN110FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I  4.0
CHGN121PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I  4.0
EPIC151INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN  3.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
MATH112CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II  4.0
LAIS100NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES  4.0
CHGN122PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1)  4.0
PHGN100PHYSICS I - MECHANICS  4.5
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
17.0
Sophomore
Fallleclabsem.hrs
MATH213CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III4.0 4.0
PHGN200PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS2.04.04.5
CHGN209INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS  3.0
CHGN221ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3.0 3.0
CHGN223ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY 3.01.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
LAIS200HUMAN SYSTEMS  3.0
EBGN201PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS3.0 3.0
CHGN222ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II3.0 3.0
CHGN224ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY 3.01.0
MATH225DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS3.0 3.0
CHGN335INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS3.0 3.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
16.5
Junior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
TECH ELECT Technical Elective*  4.0
CHGN336ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY3.0 3.0
CHGN337ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 3.01.0
CHGN341INORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3.0 3.0
CHGN351PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I3.04.04.0
CHGN395INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 3.01.0
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CHGN353PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE II3.03.04.0
CHGN323QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS AND APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY1.03.02.0
CHGN428BIOCHEMISTRY3.0 3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective I3.0 3.0
CBEN120FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY II  4.0
16.0
Summerleclabsem.hrs
CHGN490CHEMISTRY FIELD SESSION 18.06.0
6.0
Senior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CHGN429BIOCHEMISTRY II3.0 3.0
CHGN ELECT Chemistry Elective**  3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective II3.0 3.0
TECH ELECT Technical Elective*3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
15.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective III3.0 3.0
CHGN401INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II3.0 3.0
CHGN ELECT Chemistry Elective**  2.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
14.0
Total Semester Hrs: 132.5

* Technical Electives are courses in any technical field. LAIS, PAGN, Military Science and ROTC, McBride and the business courses of EBGN are not accepted technical electives. * Possible technical electives that will be recommended to students are:

CHGN403INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY3.0
CHGN462MICROBIOLOGY3.0
CBEN304ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY3.0
CBEN320CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY3.0
CBEN321INTRO TO GENETICS4.0

** Chemistry Electives are non-required courses taught within the Chemistry Department.  In addition, graduate level Chemistry and Geochemistry courses taught within the Department are acceptable. 

CHGN495 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH is taught as a possible chemistry elective.  Those aspiring to enter Ph.D. programs in Chemistry or related fields are strongly advised to include undergraduate research in their curricula.  The objective of CHGN495 is that students successfully perform an open-ended research project under the direction of a Mines faculty member.  Students must demonstrate through the preparation of a proposal, prepared in consultation with the potential faculty research advisor and the CHGN495 instructor, that they qualify for enrollment in CHGN495.

Major GPA

During the 2016-2017 Academic Year, the Undergraduate Council considered the policy concerning required major GPAs and which courses are included in each degree’s GPA.  While the GPA policy has not been officially updated, in order to provide transparency, council members agreed that publishing the courses included in each degree’s GPA is beneficial to students. 

The following list details the courses that are included in the GPA for this degree:

  • CHGC100 through CHGC599 inclusive
  • CHGN100 through CHGN599 inclusive

General Mines Minor/ASI requirements can be found here

Chemistry Minor and ASI Programs

No specific course sequences are suggested for students wishing to include chemistry minors or areas of special interest in their programs. Rather, those students should consult with the Chemistry department head (or designated faculty member) to design appropriate sequences. For the purpose of completing a minor in Chemistry, the Organic Chemistry sequence is exempt from the 100-200 level limit.

ASI programs include Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry, and Biochemistry. Refer to the main ASI section of the Bulletin for applicable rules for Areas of Special Interest.

Courses

CHGN111. INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(S) Introductory college chemistry. Elementary atomic structure and the periodic chart, chemical bonding, chemical reactions and stoichiometry of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Must not be used for elective credit. Does not apply toward undergraduate degree or g.p.a. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) Study of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation of properties of elements with position in periodic chart, chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.

CHGN122. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1). 4.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Continuation of CHGN121 concentrating on chemical kinetics, gas laws, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and chemical equilibrium (acid- base, solubility, complexation, and redox). Laboratory experiments emphasizing quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.

CHGN125. MOLECULAR ENGINEERING & MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

(I,II) Studies of the interactions of matter and energy in chemical reactions and physical processes. Building on principles from CHGN121, the course systematically explores the relationships between processes, structures and properties, starting from the atomic and molecular level. It provides a framework to apply knowledge of chemical bonding and material properties to engineering design, with an emphasis on the Engineering Grand Challenges and the discovery of new process-structure-property relationships. There is a strong focus on the underlying principles of kinetics and equilibrium, and their general applicability, strongly rooted in the first and second law of thermodynamics. Examples of these principles come primarily from solid-state systems. Laboratory experiments emphasize conceptual understanding of structure-property relationships through both hands-on and computational analysis, reinforced by quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

CHGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CHGN198LA. SPECIAL TOPICS. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

CHGN198LB. SPECIAL TOPICS. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

CHGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

CHGN209. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with DCGN209,
(I, II, S) Introduction to the fundamental principles of classical thermodynamics, with particular emphasis on chemical and phase equilibria. Volume-temperature-pressure relationships for solids, liquids, and gases; ideal and non-ideal gases. Introduction to kineticmolecular theory of ideal gases and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions. Work, heat, and application of the First Law to closed systems, including chemical reactions. Entropy and the Second and Third Laws; Gibbs Free Energy. Chemical equilibrium and the equilibrium constant; introduction to activities & fugacities. One- and two-component phase diagrams; Gibbs Phase Rule. May not also receive credit for CBEN210 or GEGN330. Prerequisites: CHGN121, CHGN122 or CHGN125, MATH111, MATH112, PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN221. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I,S) Structure, properties, and reactions of the important classes of organic compounds, introduction to reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in CHGN122 or CHGN125. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN222. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II, S) Continuation of CHGN221. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in CHGN221. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN223. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I,II, S) Laboratory exercises including purification techniques, synthesis, and characterization. Experiments are designed to support concepts presented in the CHGN221. Students are introduced to Green Chemistry principles and methods of synthesis and the use of computational software. Prerequisites: CHGN221 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours laboratory, 1 semester hour.

CHGN224. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(II, S) Laboratory exercises using more advanced synthesis techniques. Experiments are designed to support concepts presented in CHGN222. Prerequisites: CHGN221, CHGN223, and CHGN222 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours laboratory, 1 semester hour.

CHGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CHGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

CHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) The primary objective of this course is to provide all students a suitable background to understand the role nanotechnology will play in future technologies and the underpinning principals involved. Prerequisites: CHGN121 and CHGN122 or CHGN125. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN323. QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS AND APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY. 2.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Identification, separation and purification of organic compounds including use of modern physical and instrumental methods. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN222, CHGN224. 1 hour lecture; 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.

CHGN335. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Principles of AAS, AES, Visible-UV, IR, NMR, XRF, XRD, XPS, electron, and mass spectroscopy; gas and liquid chromatography; data interpretation. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN122. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN336. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Theory and techniques of gravimetry, titrimetry (acid-base, complexometric, redox, precipitation), electrochemical analysis, chemical separations; statistical evaluation of data. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in both CHGN122 and CHGN209 or CBEN210. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN337. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I) (WI) Laboratory exercises emphasizing sample preparation and instrumental methods of analysis. Prerequisite: CHGN336 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

CHGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Supervised, full-time, chemistry-related employment for a continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative Education credit does not count toward graduation except under special conditions.

CHGN341. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY I. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) The chemistry of the elements and periodic trends in reactivity is discussed. Particular concepts covered include group theory, symmetry, bonding in ionic and metallic crystal, acid-base theories, coordination chemistry, ligand field theory and radioactivity. Prerequisite: CHGN222 and CHGN209. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN351. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

(I,II,S) A study of chemical systems from a molecular physical chemistry perspective. Includes an introduction to quantum mechanics, atoms and molecules, spectroscopy, bonding and symmetry, and an introduction to modern computational chemistry. Prerequisite: MATH225; PHGN200; Grade of C- or better in CHGN 122 or CHGN 125; and Grade of C- or better in CHGN209 or CBEN210. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

CHGN353. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE II. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) A continuation of CHGN351. Includes statistical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical reaction mechanisms, electrochemistry, and selected additional topics. Prerequisite: CHGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory; 4 semester hours.

CHGN395. INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I) (WI) Introduction to Undergraduate Research is designed to introduce students to the research endeavor. Topics include ethics, hypothesis testing, critical evaluation of the scientific literature, scientific writing, bibliographic software, and proposal preparation. Prerequisites: Completion of the chemistry curriculum through the Spring semester of the sophomore year. Credit: 1 semester hour.

CHGN396. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-5 Semester Hr.

(I,II,S) Individual research project for freshman, sophomores or juniors under direction of a member of the departmental faculty. Prerequisites: None. Variable credit; 1 to 5 credit hours. Repeatable for credit. Seniors should take CHGN495 instead of CHGN396.

CHGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CHGN398LA. SPECIAL TOPICS LAB. 1-6 Semester Hr.

CHGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

CHGN401. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) The chemistry of the elements and several applications are related to inorganic chemistry are considered in this course. Particular concepts covered include experimental techniques, chemistry specific to groups of elements, catalysis and industrial processes, inorganic materials and nanotechnology, and other applications of inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHGN341. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN403. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CHGC505,
(II) Processes by which natural and anthro?pogenic chemicals interact, react and are transformed and redistributed in various environmental compartments. Air, soil and aqueous (fresh and saline surface and groundwaters) environments are covered, along with specialized envi?ronments such as waste treatment facilities and the upper atmosphere. Prerequisites: CHGN222, CHGN209 or CBEN210. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN406. INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) A comprehensive introduction to the basic concepts and principles of geochemistry, coupled with a thorough overview of the related principles of thermodynamics. Topics covered include: nucleosynthesis, origin of earth and solar system, chemical bonding, mineral chemistry, elemental distributions and geochemical cycles, chemical equilibrium and kinetics, isotope systematics, and organic and biogeochemistry. Prerequisites: CHGN121, CHGN122, and GEGN101. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.

CHGN410. SURFACE CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with MLGN510,
(II) Introduction to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension and contact angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and micro - emulsions, the solid/gas interface, surface analytical techniques, van der Waal forces, electrical properties and colloid stability, some specific colloid systems (clays, foams and emulsions). Students enrolled for graduate credit in MLGN510 must complete a special project. Prerequisite: CHGN209. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN411. APPLIED RADIOCHEMISTRY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This course is designed for those who have a budding interest radiochemistry and its applications. A brief overview of radioactivity and general chemistry will be provided in the first three weeks of the course. Follow-on weeks will feature segments focusing on the radiochemistry in the nuclear fuel cycle, radioisotope production, nuclear forensics and the environment. Prerequisite: CHGN121 and CHGN122. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

CHGN422. POLYMER CHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I) Prerequisites: CHGN221, CHGN223. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

CHGN428. BIOCHEMISTRY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Introductory study of the major molecules of biochemistry: amino acids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, lipids, and saccharides- their structure, chemistry, biological function, and biosynthesis. Stresses bioenergetics and the cell as a biological unit of organization. Discussion of classical genetics, molecular genetics, and protein synthesis. Prerequisite: CHGN222. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN429. BIOCHEMISTRY II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) A continuation of CHGN428. Topics include: nucleotide synthesis; DNA repair, replication and recombination; transcription, translation and regulation; proteomics; lipid and amino acid synthesis; protein target and degradation; membranes; receptors and signal transduction. Prerequisites: CHGN428. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN430. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER SCIENCE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CHEN415,MLGN530,
(I) An introduction to the chemistry and physics of macromolecules. Topics include the properties and statistics of polymer solutions, measurements of molecular weights, molecular weight distributions, properties of bulk polymers, mechanisms of polymer formation, and properties of thermosets and thermoplastics including elastomers. Pre requisite: CHGN222. 3 hour lecture, 3 semester hours.

CHGN462. MICROBIOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CHGN562,ESGN580,
(II)?This course will cover the basic fundamentals of microbiology, such as structure and function of prokaryotic versus eukaryotic cells; viruses; classification of microorganisms; microbial metabolism, energetics, genetics, growth and diversity, microbial interactions with plants, animals, and other microbes. Special focus will be on pathogenic bacteriology, virology, and parasitology including disease symptoms, transmission, and treatment. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

CHGN475. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This class provides a survey of techniques of computational chemistry, including quantum mechanics (both Hartree-Fock and density functional approaches) and molecular dynamics. Emphasis is given to the integration of these techniques with experimental programs of molecular design and development. Prerequisites: CHGN351, CHGN401. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CHGN490. CHEMISTRY FIELD SESSION. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(S) (WI) Professional-level chemistry experience featuring modules including organic/polymer synthesis and characterization, inorganic nanomaterial investigations, computational chemistry, environmental chemical analysis , biochemistry and technical report writing. Prerequisites: CHGN323, CHGN341, and CHGN353. 6-week summer session; 6 semester hours.

CHGN495. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-5 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) (WI) Individual research project under direction of a member of the Departmental faculty. Prerequisites: selection of a research topic and advisor, preparation and approval of a research proposal, completion of chemistry curriculum through the junior year. Variable credit; 1 to 5 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

CHGN496A. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 16.0 Semester Hrs.

CHGN497. INTERNSHIP. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Individual internship experience with an industrial, academic, or governmental host supervised by a Departmental faculty member. Prerequisites: Completion of chemistry curriculum through the junior year. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.

CHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CHGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.