Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Program Description

Metallurgical and materials engineering plays a role in all manufacturing processes which convert raw materials into useful products adapted to human needs. The primary goal of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering program is to provide undergraduates with a fundamental knowledge base associated with materials-processing, their properties, and their selection and application. Upon graduation, students will have acquired and developed the necessary background and skills for successful careers in materials related industries. Furthermore, the benefits of continued education toward graduate degrees and other avenues, and the pursuit of knowledge in other disciplines should be well inculcated.

The emphasis in the Department is on materials processing operations which encompass: the conversion of mineral and chemical resources into metallic, ceramic or polymeric materials; the synthesis of new materials; refining and processing to produce high performance materials for applications from consumer products to aerospace and electronics; the development of mechanical, chemical and physical properties of materials related to their processing and structure; and the selection of materials for specific applications.

The metallurgical and materials engineering discipline is founded on fundamentals in chemistry, mathematics and physics which contribute to building the knowledge base and developing the skills for the processing of materials so as to achieve specifications requested for a particular industrial or advanced product. The engineering principles in this discipline include: crystal structure and structural analysis, thermodynamics of materials, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena, phase equilibria, phase transformations, microstructural evolution, mechanical behavior, and properties of materials.

The core-discipline fundamentals are applied to a broad range of materials processes including extraction and refining of materials, alloy development, casting, mechanical working, joining and forming, ceramic particle processing, high temperature reactions and synthesis of engineered materials. In each stage of processing, the effects of resultant microstructures and morphologies on materials properties and performance are emphasized.

Laboratories, located in Nathaniel Hill Hall, are among the finest in the nation. The laboratories, in conjunction with classroom instruction, provide for a well-integrated education of the undergraduates working towards their baccalaureate degrees. These facilities are well equipped and dedicated to: particulate and chemical/extraction, metallurgical and materials processing, foundry science, corrosion and hydro/electro-metallurgical studies, physical and mechanical metallurgy, welding and joining, forming, processing and testing of ceramic materials. Mechanical testing facilities include computerized machines for tension, compression, torsion, toughness, fatigue and thermo-mechanical testing.

There are also other highly specialized research laboratories dedicated to: vapor deposition, and both plasma and high-temperature reaction systems. Supporting analytical laboratories also exist for surface analysis, emission spectrometry, X-ray analysis, optical microscopy and image analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and micro-thermal-analysis/mass spectrometry. Metallurgical and materials engineering involves all of the processes that transform precursor materials into final engineered products adapted to human needs. The objective of the metallurgical and materials engineering program is to impart a fundamental knowledge of materials processing, properties, selection and application in order to provide graduates with the background and skills needed for successful careers in materials-related industries, for continued education toward graduate degrees and for the pursuit of knowledge in other disciplines.

The program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

The Departments of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and Physics collaborate to offer a five-year program designed to meet the needs of the electronics and similar high-tech industries. Students who satisfy the requirements of the program obtain an undergraduate degree in either Engineering Physics or in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering in four years and a Master of Engineering degree in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering at the end of the fifth year. The program is designed to provide a strong background in science fundamentals, as well as specialized training in the materials-science and processing needs of these industries. Thus, the educational objective of the program is to provide students with the specific educational requirements to begin a career in microelectronics and, at the same time, a broad and flexible background necessary to remain competitive in this exciting and rapidly changing industry. The undergraduate electives which satisfy the requirements of the program and an overall curriculum need to be discussed with the student’s advisor and approved by the Physics or Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Departments. A Program Mentor in each Department can also provide counseling on the program.

Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MME) Program Educational Objectives

The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MME) program emphasizes the structure, properties, processing and performance of materials. Program educational objectives are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years of graduation. The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering program at Mines prepares graduates who:

  1. obtain a range of positions in industry or positions in government facilities or pursue graduate education in engineering, science, or other fields;
  2. demonstrate advancement in their chosen careers;
  3. engage in appropriate professional societies and continuing education activities.

The three MME program educational objectives were determined by using inputs from program constituencies (faculty, students, visiting committee, industry recruiters and alumni). These objectives are consistent with those of the Colorado School of Mines. Mines is an engineering and applied science institution, dedicated to the education and training of students who will be stewards of the earth's resources.

Primary Contact

Maria Burwell
303-273-3780
burwell@mines.edu

Professors

Angus Rockett, Department Head

Corby G. Anderson, Harrison Western Professor

Michael J. Kaufman, Dean of CASE

Stephen Liu, American Bureau of Shipping Endowed Chair Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Ryan P. O'Hayre, Program Director of Materials Science

Ivar E. Reimanis, Herman F. Coors Distinguished Professor of Ceramics

Sridhar Seetharaman, Professor

John G. Speer, John Henry Moore Distinguished Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Patrick R. Taylor, George S. Ansell Distinguished Professor of Chemical Metallurgy

Associate Professors

Amy Clarke

Kip O. Findley

Brian P. Gorman

Jeffrey C. King

Corinne E. Packard

Steven W. Thompson

Assistant Professors

Geoff L. Brennecka

Kester Clarke, FIERF Professor

Emmanuel De Moor

Vladen Stevanovic

Zhenzhen Yu

Teaching Professor

Gerald Bourne, Assistant Department Head

Emeriti Professors

Glen R. Edwards, University Professor Emeritus

John P. Hager, University Professor Emeritus

George Krauss, University Professor Emeritus

Gerard P. Martins, Professor Emeritus

David K. Matlock, University Professor Emeritus

Brajendra Mishra, University Professor Emeritus

John J. Moore, Professor Emeritus

David L. Olson, University Professor Emeritus

Dennis W. Readey, Universtiy Professor Emeritus

Chester J. Van Tyne, Professor Emeritus

Emeriti Associate Professors

Gerald L. DePoorter

Robert H. Frost

Curriculum

The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MME) curriculum is organized to educate students in the fundamentals of materials (MME Basics) and their applications (MME Applications) with the option of pursuing a track in one of four focus areas.

A. MME Basics: The basic curriculum in the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering program will provide a background in the following topic areas:

  1. Crystal Structures and Structural Analysis: crystal systems; symmetry elements and Miller indices; atomic bonding; metallic, ceramic and polymeric structures; x-ray and electron diffraction; stereographic projection and crystal orientation; long range order; defects in materials.
  2. Thermodynamics of Materials: heat and mass balances; thermodynamic laws; chemical potential and chemical equilibrium; solution thermodynamics & solution models; partial molar and excess quantities; solid state thermodynamics; thermodynamics of surfaces; electrochemistry.
  3. Transport Phenomena and Kinetics: Heat, mass and momentum transport; transport properties of fluids; diffusion mechanisms; reaction kinetics; nucleation and growth kinetics.
  4. Phase Equilibria: phase rule; binary and ternary systems; microstructural evolution; defects in crystals; surface phenomena; phase transformations: eutectic, eutectoid, martensitic, nucleation and growth, recovery; microstructural evolution; strengthening mechanisms; quantitative stereology; heat treatment.
  5. Properties of Materials: mechanical properties; chemical properties (oxidation and corrosion); electrical, magnetic and optical properties: failure analysis.

B. MME Applications: The course content in the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering program emphasizes the following applications:

  1. Materials Processing: particulate processing; thermo- and electro-chemical materials processing; hydrometallurgical processing; synthesis of materials; deformation processing; solidification and casting; welding and joining.
  2. Design and Application of Materials: materials selection; ferrous and nonferrous metals; ceramics; polymers; composites; electronic materials.
  3. Statistical Process Control and Design of Experiments: statistical process control; process capability analysis; design of experiments.

C. MME Curriculum Requirements: The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering course sequence is designed to fulfill the program goals and to satisfy the curriculum requirements. The time sequence of courses organized by degree program, year and semester, is listed below.

Degree Requirements (Bachelor of Science in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

Freshman
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CHGN121PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I  4.0
CSM101FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR  0.5
EDNS151INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN  3.0
MATH111CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I  4.0
MATH201PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS, GEGN 101, or CBEN 110  3.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
15.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CHGN122PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1) or 125  4.0
HASS100NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES  4.0
PHGN100PHYSICS I - MECHANICS  4.5
MATH112CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II  4.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
17.0
Summerleclabsem.hrs
MTGN272MME FIELD SESSION  3.0
3.0
Sophomore
Fallleclabsem.hrs
MATH213CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III  4.0
PHGN200PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS  4.5
MTGN202ENGINEERED MATERIALS  3.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
HASS200GLOBAL STUDIES  3.0
MTGN251METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS  3.0
18.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
MATH225DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS  3.0
CEEN241STATICS  3.0
EBGN201PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS  3.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
MTGN211STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS  3.0
MTGN281INTRODUCTION TO PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN MATERIALS SYSTEMS  2.0
EDNS263EPICS II MATERIALS, 251, 261, 262, 263, 264, CEEN 267, or EDNS 269  3.0
17.5
Junior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CEEN311MECHANICS OF MATERIALS  3.0
MTGN352METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS KINETICS  3.0
TECH ELECTRestricted Technical Elective**  3.0
MTGN314PROPERTIES AND PROCESSING OF CERAMICS  2.0
MTGN314LPROPERTIES AND PROCESSING OF CERAMICS LABORATORY  1.0
MTGN350STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS  3.0
15.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
MTGN334CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF MATERIALS  3.0
MTGN334LCHEMICAL PROCESSING OF MATERIALS LABORATORY  1.0
MTGN348MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT  3.0
MTGN348LMICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY  1.0
FREE Free Elective  3.0
HASS/EBGNHASS Mid-Level Restricted Elective  3.0
MTGN315ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS  3.0
17.0
Senior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
MTGN445MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS  3.0
MTGN445LMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS LABORATORY  1.0
MTGN MTGN Elective  3.0
MTGN461TRANSPORT PHENOMENA AND REACTOR DESIGN FOR METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERS  3.0
HASS/EBGN HASS Mid-Level Restricted Elective  3.0
FREEFree Elective  3.0
MTGN467MATERIALS DESIGN: SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND SELECTION  2.0
18.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
MTGN MTGN Elective  3.0
MTGN MTGN Elective  3.0
MTGN MTGN Elective  3.0
FREE Free Elective  3.0
MTGN468MATERIALS DESIGN: SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND SELECTION  2.0
HASS/EBGNHASS 400-Level Restricted Elective  3.0
17.0
Total Semester Hrs: 137.5

** Restricted Technical Electives:

CBEN120FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY II4.0
CEEN301FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I3.0
CHGN209INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS3.0
or CBEN210 INTRO TO THERMODYNAMICS
CHGN221ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3.0
CHGN335INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS3.0
CHGN336ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY3.0
CHGN351PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I4.0
CSCI261PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS3.0
EENG281INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS, ELECTRONICS AND POWER3.0
ENGY200INTRODUCTION TO ENERGY3.0
MATH201PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS3.0
MATH332LINEAR ALGEBRA3.0
MATH348ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS3.0
PHGN215ANALOG ELECTRONICS4.0
PHGN300PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I3.0

Major GPA

During the 2016-2017 Academic Year, the Undergraduate Council considered the policy concerning required major GPAs and which courses are included in each degree’s GPA.  While the GPA policy has not been officially updated, in order to provide transparency, council members agreed that publishing the courses included in each degree’s GPA is beneficial to students. 

The following list details the courses that are included in the GPA for this degree:

  • MTGN100 through MTGN599 inclusive

Five Year Combined Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Baccalaureate and Master of Engineering in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, with an Electronic-Materials Emphasis.*

The Departments of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and Physics collaborate to offer a five-year program designed to meet the needs of the electronics and similar high-tech industries. Students who satisfy the requirements of the program obtain an undergraduate degree in either Engineering Physics or in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering in four years and a Master of Engineering degree in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering at the end of the fifth year. The program is designed to provide a strong background in science fundamentals, as well as specialized training in the materials-science and processing needs of these industries. Thus, the educational objective of the program is to provide students with the specific educational requirements to begin a career in microelectronics and, at the same time, a broad and flexible background necessary to remain competitive in this exciting and rapidly changing industry. The undergraduate electives which satisfy the requirements of the program and an overall curriculum need to be discussed with the student’s advisor and approved by the Physics or Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Departments. A Program Mentor in each Department can also provide counseling on the program.

Application for admission to this program should be made during the first semester of the sophomore year (in special cases, later entry may be approved, upon review, by one of the program mentors). Undergraduate students admitted to the program must maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or better. The graduate segment of the program requires a case study report, submitted to the student’s graduate advisor. Additional details on the Master of Engineering can be found in the Graduate Degree and Requirements section of the Graduate Bulletin. The case study is started during the student’s senior design-project and completed during the year of graduate study. A student admitted to the program is expected to select a graduate advisor, in advance of the graduate-studies final year, and prior to the start of their senior year. The case-study topic is then identified and selected in consultation with the graduate advisor. A formal application, during the senior year, for admission to the graduate program in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering must be submitted to the Graduate School. Students who have maintained all the standards of the program requirements leading up to this step, can expect to be admitted.

General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.

Minor in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

A minor program in metallurgical and materials engineering consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours of a logical sequence of courses.  Students majoring in metallurgical and material engineering are not eligible to earn a minor in the department.

A minor program declaration (available in the Registrar's Office) must be submitted for approval prior to the student's completion of half of the hours proposed to constitute the program. Approvals are required from the department head of metallurgical and materials engineering, the student's advisor, and the department head or division director in the department or division in which the student is enrolled.

Recommended Courses: The following courses are recommended for students seeking to earn a minor in metallurgical and materials engineering:

MTGN202ENGINEERED MATERIALS3.0
MTGN311STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS3.0
MTGN311LSTRUCTURE OF MATERIALS LABORATORY1.0
MTGN348MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT3.0
MTGN348LMICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY1.0
MTGN445MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS3.0
MTGN445LMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS LABORATORY1.0
300- or 400- level course in metallurgical and materials engineering3.0
Total Semester Hrs18.0

Other sequences are permissible to suit the special interests of individual students. These other sequences need to be discussed and approved by the department head in metallurgical and materials engineering.

Explosive Processing of Materials Minor

Program Advisor: Dr. Stephen Liu

There are very few academic explosive engineering-related programs in the United States of America and around the world. In fact, Colorado School of Mines is the only educational institution that offers an explosive processing of materials minor program in the U.S.A. Built to the tradition of combining academic education with hands-on experience of CSM, this minor program will prepare the students for new and developing applications in materials joining, forming and synthesis that involve the use of explosives.

Under proper development of courses and background in explosives, students enrolled in this program will apply these energetic materials to the processing of traditional and advanced materials. The program focuses on the microstructural and property development in materials as a function of deformation rate. Selection of suitable explosives and proper parameters, selection of specific materials for explosive processing and application, and optimization of post-processing properties are the three major attributes acquired at the completion of this minor program. With the help of the program advisor, the students will design and select the proper course sequence and complete a hands-on research project under the supervision of a faculty advisor.

Courses

MTGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING. 1-3 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally offered only once. Prerequisite: none. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

MTGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Independent work leading to a comprehensive report. This work may take the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Choice of problem is arranged between student and a specific department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic; Independent Study Form must be completed and submitted to Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

MTGN202. ENGINEERED MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with SYGN202,
(I, II, S) Introduction to the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering paradigm: processing, structure, and properties. The course will relate technologically significant processing procedures to resultant structures. The material structure will be examined to determine its effect upon material properties. Students will study materials engineering methodologies and learn terminology. Prerequisites: CHGN122 or CHGN125, MATH112, and PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN211. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Principles of atomic bonding, crystallography, and amorphous structures. ii) Symmetry relationships to material properties. iii) Atomic structure determination through diffraction techniques. Prerequisite: MTGN202. Corequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN251. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Applications of thermodynamics in extractive and physical metallurgy and materials science. Thermodynamics of solutions including solution models and thermodynamic properties of alloys and slags. Reaction equilibria with examples in alloy systems and slags. Phase stability analysis. Thermodynamic properties of binary alloys in the solid state, defect equilibrium, and interactions. Prerequisites: MATH112, CHGN122 or CHGN125, and PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN272. MME FIELD SESSION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(S) Introduction to the field of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. Overview of opportunities, expectations, and practices within the MME department and the broader materials community. Introduction to bonding, crystal and grain structure, application space, and Structure-Property-Processing relationships. Laboratory projects and plant visits. Prerequisites: MATH112, PHGN100. 9 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

MTGN281. INTRODUCTION TO PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN MATERIALS SYSTEMS. 2.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Review of the concepts of chemical equilibrium and derivation of the Gibbs phase rule. Application of the Gibbs phase rule to interpreting one, two and three component phase equilibrium diagrams. Application to alloy and ceramic materials systems. Emphasis on the evolution of phases and their amounts and the resulting microstructural development. Prerequisites: MTGN202, and MTGN251 or MTGN351. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.

MTGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally offered only once. Prerequisite: none. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

MTGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Independent work leading to a comprehensive report. This work may take the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Choice of problem is arranged between student and a specific department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic; Independent Study Form must be completed and submitted to Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

MTGN300. FOUNDRY METALLURGY. 2.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Design and metallurgical aspects of casting, patterns, molding materials and processes, solidification processes, risers and gating concepts, casting defects and inspection, melting practice, cast alloy selection. Corequisite: MTGN300L. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.

MTGN300L. FOUNDRY METALLURGY LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with MTGN302,
(II) Experiments in the foundry designed to supplement the lectures of MTGN300. Corequisite: MTGN300. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

MTGN311. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Principles of crystallography and crystal chemistry. Characterization of crystalline materials using X-ray diffraction techniques. Applications to include compound identification, lattice parameter measurement, orientation of single crystals, and crystal structure determination. Prerequisites: PHGN200 and MTGN202. Co-requisite: MTGN311L. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN311L. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I) (WI) Experiments in structure of materials to supplement the lectures of MTGN311. Co-requisite: MTGN311. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

MTGN314. PROPERTIES AND PROCESSING OF CERAMICS. 2.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Application of engineering principles and fundamental structure-processing-property relationship to inorganic non-metallic materials. Emergence of macroscopic characteristics and functional properties from bonding, structure, symmetry, and defects. Applications of basic thermodynamic and kinetic principles to powder-based processing. Corequisites: MTGN314L, MTGN202, and MTGN251 or MTGN351. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.

MTGN314L. PROPERTIES AND PROCESSING OF CERAMICS LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I) Laboratory for MTGN314. Corequisite: MTGN314. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

MTGN315. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Survey of the electrical properties of materials, and the applications of materials as electrical circuit components. The effects of chemistry, processing and microstructure on the electrical properties. Functions, performance requirements and testing methods of material for each type of circuit component. General topics covered are conductors, resistors, insulators, capacitors, energy converters, magnetic materials and integrated circuits. Prerequisite: PHGN200. Corequisite: MTGN211 or MTGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN334. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Development and application of fundamental principles related to the processing of metals and materials by thermochemical and aqueous and fused salt electrochemical/chemical routes. The course material is presented within the framework of a formalism that examines the physical chemistry, thermodynamics, reaction mechanisms and kinetics inherent to a wide selection of chemical processing systems. The general formalism provides for a transferable knowledge-base to other systems not specifically covered in the course. Prerequisites: MTGN272, MTGN351, and CEEN267 or EDNS251 or EDNS261 or EDNS262 or EDNS264 or EDNS269. Corequisite: MTGN334L. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

MTGN334L. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF MATERIALS LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(II) Experiments in chemical processing of materials to supplement the lectures of MTGN334. Corequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

MTGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 1-3 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific educational objectives are achieved. 1 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative education credit does not count toward graduation except under special conditions. Repeatable.

MTGN348. MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) An introduction to the relationships between microstructure and properties of materials, with emphasis on metallic and ceramic systems; Fundamentals of imperfections in crystalline materials on material behavior; recrystallization and grain growth; strengthening mechanisms: grain refinement, solid solution strengthening, precipitation strengthening, and microstructural strengthening; and phase transformations. Prerequisites: MTGN211 or MTGN311, and MTGN251 or MTGN351. Corequisites: MTGN281 or MTGN381, and MTGN348L. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

MTGN348L. MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(II) Experiments in microstructural development of materials to supplement the lectures of MTGN348. Corequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

MTGN350. STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Introduction to statistical process control, process capability analysis and experimental design techniques. Statistical process control theory and techniques developed and applied to control charts for variables and attributes involved in process control and evaluation. Process capability concepts developed and applied to the evaluation of manufacturing processes. Theory of designed experiments developed and applied to full factorial experiments, fractional factorial experiments, screening experiments, multilevel experiments and mixture experiments. Analysis of designed experiments by graphical and statistical techniques. Introduction to computer software for statistical process control and for the design and analysis of experiments. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

MTGN351. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Applications of thermodynamics in extractive and physical metallurgy and materials science. Thermodynamics of solutions including solution models, calculation of activities from phase diagrams, and measurements of thermodynamic properties of alloys and slags. Reaction equilibria with examples in alloy systems and slags. Phase stability analysis. Thermodynamic properties of phase diagrams in material systems, defect equilibrium and interactions. Prerequisite: CHGN209 or CBEN210. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN352. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS KINETICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Introduction to reaction kinetics: chemical kinetics, atomic and molecular diffusion, surface thermodynamics and kinetics of interfaces and nucleation-and-growth. Applications to materials processing and performance aspects associated with gas/solid reactions, precipitation and dissolution behavior, oxidation and corrosion, purification of semiconductors, carburizing of steel, formation of p-n junctions and other important materials systems. Prerequisite: MTGN272. Corequisite: MTGN251 or MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN381. INTRODUCTION TO PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN MATERIALS SYSTEMS. 2.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Review of the concepts of chemical equilibrium and derivation of the Gibbs phase rule. Application of the Gibbs phase rule to interpreting one, two and three component phase equilibrium diagrams. Application to alloy and ceramic materials systems. Emphasis on the evolution of phases and their amounts and the resulting microstructural development. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MTGN351. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.

MTGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING. 1-3 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally offered only once. Prerequisite: none. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

MTGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Independent work leading to a comprehensive report. This work may take the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Choice of problem is arranged between student and a specific department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic; Independent Study Form must be completed and submitted to Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

MTGN403. SENIOR THESIS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II,S) Two-semester individual research under the direction of members of the MME faculty. Work may include library and laboratory research on topics of relevance. Oral presentation will be given at the end of the second semester and written thesis submitted to committee of evaluation. 3 hours research; 3 semester hours.

MTGN407. STEEL BAR MANUFACTURING. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I) Facilities and metallurgical principles for manufacturing carbon and low alloy steel bars that are further transformed into high performance parts. Discussion of steel melting, ladle refining, casting, hot rolling, heat treatment, final processing, inspection and testing methods. Implications of process design and control on chemical uniformity, macrostructure, microstructure, internal quality, surface quality, mechanical properties and residual stresses. Review of customer processes and requirements for manufacturing parts from bars by hot or cold forging, machining, surface treating, and heat treating. Applications include crankshafts, gears, axles, drive shafts, springs, bearings, rails, line pipe, oil well casing, etc. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 1 hour lecture; 1.0 semester hour.

MTGN412. CERAMIC ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and ceramic materials. Processing of raw materials and production of ceramic bodies, glazes, glasses, enamels, and cements. Firing processes and reactions in glass bonded as well as mechanically bonded systems. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN414. ADVANCED PROCESSING AND SINTERING OF CERAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Principles of ceramics processing and the relationship between processing and microstructure, with a focus on advanced microstructural control using thermal and athermal energy input in single and multiphase systems. Principles will be illustrated using case studies on specific ceramic materials. A project to design a ceramic fabrication process is required. Prerequisite: MTGN314. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN415. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Survey of the electrical properties of materials, and the applications of materials as electrical circuit components. The effects of chemistry, processing and microstructure on the electrical properties. Functions, performance requirements and testing methods of materials for each type of circuit component. General topics covered are conductors, resistors, insulators, capacitors, energy converters, magnetic materials and integrated circuits. Prerequisites: PHGN200 and MTGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN419. NON-CRYSTALLINE MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Introduction to the principles of glass science and engineering and non-crystalline materials in general. Glass formation, structure, crystallization and properties will be covered, along with a survey of commercial glass compositions, manufacturing processes and applications. Prerequisites: MTGN211 or MTGN311, and MTGN412 or MTGN314. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN429. METALLURGICAL ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Examination of the interface between metallurgical process engineering and environmental engineering. Wastes, effluents and their point sources in metallurgical processes such as mineral concentration, value extraction and process metallurgy are studied in context. Fundamentals of metallurgical unit operations and unit processes with those applicable to waste and effluent control, disposal and materials recycling are covered. Engineering design and engineering cost components are also included for selected examples. Fundamentals and applications receive equal coverage. Prerequisites: MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN430. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF IRON AND STEELMAKING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Physical chemistry principles of blast furnace and direct reduction production of iron and refining of iron to steel. Discussion of raw materials, productivity, impurity removal, deoxidation, alloy additions, and ladle metallurgy. Offered every other year. Prerequisites: MTGN334, and MTGN251 or MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN431. HYDRO- AND ELECTRO-METALLURGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Physicochemical principles associated with the extraction and refining of metals by hydro- and electrometallurgical techniques. Discussion of unit processes in hydrometallurgy, electrowinning, and electrorefining. Analysis of integrated flowsheets for the recovery of nonferrous metals. Offered every other year. Prerequisites: MTGN334, MTGN352, and MTGN351 or MTGN251. Corequisite: MTGN461. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN432. PYROMETALLURGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Extraction and refining of metals including emerging practices. Modifications driven by environmental regulations and by energy minimization. Analysis and design of processes and the impact of economic constraints. Prerequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN442. ENGINEERING ALLOYS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) This course is intended to be an important component of the physical metallurgy sequence, to reinforce and integrate principles from earlier courses, and enhance the breadth and depth of understanding of concepts in a wide variety of alloy systems. Metallic systems considered include iron and steels, copper, aluminum, titanium, superalloys, etc. Phase stability, microstructural evolution and structure/property relationships are emphasized. Offered every other year. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN445. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Mechanical properties and relationships. Plastic deformation of crystalline materials. Relationships of microstructures to mechanical strength. Fracture, creep, and fatigue. Prerequisite: MTGN348. Corequisite: MTGN445L. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

MTGN445L. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I) Laboratory sessions devoted to advanced mechanical-testing techniques to illustrate the application of the fundamentals presented in the lectures of MTGN445. Corequisite: MTGN445. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

MTGN450. STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Introduction to statistical process control, process capability analysis and experimental design techniques. Statistical process control theory and techniques developed and applied to control charts for variables and attributes involved in process control and evaluation. Process capability concepts developed and applied to the evaluation of manufacturing processes. Theory of designed experiments developed and applied to full factorial experiments, fractional factorial experiments, screening experiments, multilevel experiments and mixture experiments. Analysis of designed experiments by graphical and statistical techniques. Introduction to computer software for statistical process control and for the design and analysis of experiments. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

MTGN451. CORROSION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Principles of electrochemistry. Corrosion mechanisms. Methods of corrosion control including cathodic and anodic protection and coatings. Examples, from various industries, of corrosion problems and solutions. Prerequisite: MTGN251 or MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN456. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY. 2.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Introduction to electron optics and the design and application of transmission and scanning electron microscopes. Interpretation of images produced by various contrast mechanisms. Electron diffraction analysis and the indexing of electron diffraction patterns. Prerequisites: MTGN211 or MTGN311. Corequisite: MTGN456L. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.

MTGN456L. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with MTGN458,
(I, II, S) Laboratory exercises to illustrate specimen preparation techniques, microscope operation, and the interpretation of images produced from a variety of specimens, and to supplement the lectures in MTGN456. Corequisite: MTGN456. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

MTGN461. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA AND REACTOR DESIGN FOR METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Introduction to the conserved-quantities: momentum, heat, and mass transfer, and application of chemical kinetics to elementary reactor-design. Examples from materials processing and process metallurgy. Molecular transport properties: viscosity, thermal conductivity, and mass diffusivity of materials encountered during processing operations. Uni-directional transport: problem formulation based on the required balance of the conserved- quantity applied to a control-volume. Prediction of velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. Equations of change: continuity, motion, and energy. Transport with two independent variables (unsteady-state behavior). Interphase transport: dimensionless correlations friction factor, heat, and mass transfer coefficients. Elementary concepts of radiation heat-transfer. Flow behavior in packed beds. Design equations for: continuous- flow/batch reactors with uniform dispersion and plug flow reactors. Digital computer methods for the design of metallurgical systems. Prerequisite: MATH225, MTGN334, and MTGN352. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN461L. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA AND REACTOR DESIGN LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(II) Experiments in transport phenomena and reactor design to supplement the lectures of MTGN461. Co-requisite: MTGN461. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

MTGN462. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION AND RECYCLING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course will examine, using case studies, how industry applies engineering principles to minimize waste formation and to meet solid waste recycling challenges. Both proven and emerging solutions to solid waste environmental problems, especially those associated with metals, will be discussed. Prerequisites: CEEN301, CEEN302, and CHGN403. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN463. POLYMER ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) An introduction to the structure and properties of polymeric materials, their deformation and failure mechanisms, and the design and fabrication of polymeric end items. The molecular and crystallographic structures of polymers will be developed and related to the elastic, viscoelastic, yield, and fracture properties of polymer solids and reinforced polymer composites. Emphasis will be placed on forming and joining techniques for end item fabrication including: extrusion, injection molding, reaction injection molding, thermoforming, and blow molding. The design of end items will be considered in relation to: materials selection, manufacturing engineering, properties and applications. Offered every other year. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN464. FORGING AND FORMING. 2.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Introduction to plasticity. Survey and analysis of working operations of forging, extrusion, rolling, wire drawing and sheet-metal forming. Metallurgical structure evolution during working. Prerequisites: CEEN311 or MEGN312, and MTGN348 or MEGN350. Corequisite: MTGN464L. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.

MTGN464L. FORGING AND FORMING LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(II) Experiments in forging and forming to supplement the lectures of MTGN464. Corequisite: MTGN464. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

MTGN465. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Mechanical properties of ceramics and ceramic-based composites; brittle fracture of solids; toughening mechanisms in composites; fatigue, high-temperature mechanical behavior, including fracture and creep deformation. Offered every other year. Prerequisites: MTGN211 or MTGN311, and MTGN314 or MTGN412. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN466. MATERIALS DESIGN: SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND SELECTION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) (WI) Application of fundamental materials-engineering principles to the design of systems for extraction and synthesis, and to the selection of materials. Systems covered range from those used for metallurgical processing to those used for processing of emergent materials. Microstructural design, characterization and properties evaluation provide the basis for linking synthesis to applications. Selection criteria tied to specific requirements such as corrosion resistance, wear and abrasion resistance, high temperature service, cryogenic service, vacuum systems, automotive systems, electronic and optical systems, high strength/weight ratios, recycling, economics and safety issues. Materials investigated include mature and emergent metallic, ceramic and composite systems used in the manufacturing and fabrication industries. Student-team designactivities including oral- and written?reports. Prerequisite: MTGN351, MTGN352, MTGN445 and MTGN461. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

MTGN467. MATERIALS DESIGN: SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND SELECTION. 2.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Application of fundamental materials engineering principles to the design of systems, processes, and/or components for extraction, synthesis, operation and/or selection of materials in open-ended projects with realistic constraints. Project topics range from processes used for metallurgical processing and extraction to design and development of emergent materials to process/component analysis and (re)design. Chemical and microstructural characterization and property measurements provide the basis for linking synthesis to application and/or process to product. Selection criteria tied to specific requirements drive design under realistic constraints that include an appropriate mix of technical, economic, safety, and other considerations. Activities are carried out in teams in collaboration with project sponsors/clients. Prerequisite: MTGN348. Corequisites: MTGN461, MTGN445. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.

MTGN468. MATERIALS DESIGN: SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND SELECTION. 2.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Application of fundamental materials engineering principles to the design of systems, processes, and/or components for extraction, synthesis, operation and/or selection of materials in open-ended projects with realistic constraints. Project topics range from processes used for metallurgical processing and extraction to design and development of emergent materials to process/component analysis and (re)design. Chemical and microstructural characterization and property measurements provide the basis for linking synthesis to application and/or process to product. Selection criteria tied to specific requirements drive design under realistic constraints that include an appropriate mix of technical, economic, safety, and other considerations. Activities are carried out in teams in collaboration with project sponsors/clients. Prerequisite: MTGN352. Corequisites: MTGN348, MTGN334. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.

MTGN469. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CHEN469,EGGN469,
(I) Fuel cells provide one of the most efficient means for converting the chemical energy stored in a fuel to electrical energy. Fuel cells offer improved energy efficiency and reduced pollution compared to heat engines. While composed of no (or very few) moving parts, a complete fuel cell system amounts to a small chemical plant for the production of power. This course introduces students to the fundamental aspects of fuel cell systems, with emphasis placed on proton exchange membrane (PEM) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Students will learn the basic principles of electrochemical energy conversion while being exposed to relevant topics in materials science, thermodynamics, and fluid mechanics. Offered every other year. Prerequisites: PHGN200, MATH315, and MTGN251 or MTGN351 or CHGN209 or CHGN210 or MEGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN472. BIOMATERIALS I. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course introduces biomaterials by combining materials engineering principles with understanding of aspects of molecular and cellular biology so that students learn how materials interact with biological systems, particularly for medical use. The course is organized around four main topics: 1) fundamental properties of biomaterials; 2) fundamental concepts in biology relevant to biomaterials; 3) interactions of physiological systems with biomaterials, and 4) processing of biopolymers, bioceramics and glasses, biometals and composites. Key topics covered include processing of materials to achieve specific biological responses, surface energy and surface modification; protein adsorption; cell adhesion, spreading and migration; biomaterials implantation and acute inflammation; blood-materials interactions; biofilms and biomaterials degradation; and clinical applications of biomaterials. Offered every other year. Prerequisite: MTGN202. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MTGN475. METALLURGY OF WELDING. 2.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Introduction to welding processes; thermal aspects; selection of filler metals; stresses; stress relief and annealing; pre- and postweld heat treating; weld defects; welding ferrous and nonferrous alloys; weld metal phase transformations; metallurgical evaluation of resulting weld microstructures and properties; and welding tests. Offered every other year. Prerequisite: MTGN348. Corequisite: MTGN475L. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.

MTGN475L. METALLURGY OF WELDING LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with MTGN477,
(I, II, S) Experiments designed to supplement the lectures in MTGN475. Offered every other year. Corequisite: MTGN475. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

MTGN497. SUMMER PROGRAMS. 0.0 Semester Hrs.

(S) Summer registration. Repeatable.

MTGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally offered only once. Prerequisite: none. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

MTGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Independent advanced-work leading to a comprehensive report. This work may take the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Selection of problem is arranged between student and a specific Department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic; Independent Study Form must be completed and submitted to Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.