Liberal Arts and International Studies

2017-2018

Program Description

As the 21st century unfolds, individuals, communities, and nations face major challenges in energy, natural resources, and the environment. While these challenges demand practical ingenuity from engineers and applied scientists, solutions must also take into account social, political, economic, cultural, ethical, and global contexts. Mines students, as citizens and future professionals, confront a rapidly changing society that demands core technical skills complemented by flexible intelligence, original thought, and cultural sensitivity.

Starting in January 2017 the Liberal Arts and International Studies (LAIS) Division will be titled Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) Division.

Courses in Liberal Arts and International Studies (LAIS) expand students' professional and personal capacities by providing opportunities to explore the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. Our curricula encourage the development of critical thinking skills that will help students make more informed choices as national and world citizens - promoting more complex understandings of justice, equality, culture, history, development, and sustainability. Students,for example, study ethical reasoning, compare and contrast different economies and cultures, develop arguments from data, and interrogate globalization. LAIS courses also foster creativity by offering opportunities for self-discovery. Students conduct literary analyses, improve communication skills, play music, learn media theory, and write poetry. These experiences foster intellectual agility, personal maturity, and respect for the complexity of our world.

Undergraduate Humanities and Social Science

Educational Objectives

In addition to contributing to the educational objectives described in the Mines Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the coursework in the Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies is designed to help Mines develop in students the ability to engage in life-long learning and recognize the value of doing so by acquiring the broad education necessary to

  1. Understand the impact of engineering solutions in contemporary, global, international, societal, political, and ethical contexts;
  2. Understand the role of Humanities and Social Sciences in identifying, formulating, and solving engineering problems;
  3. Prepare to live and work in a complex world;
  4. Understand the meaning and implications of “stewardship of the Earth”; and
  5. Communicate effectively in writing and orally.

Music (LIMU)

Courses in Music do not count toward the Humanities & Social Sciences General Education restricted elective requirement, but may be taken for Free Elective credit only.  A maximum of 3.0 semester hours of concert band, chorus, physical education, athletics or other activity credit combined may be used toward free elective credit in a degree granting program.

Foreign Language (LIFL)

Typically,several foreign languages are taught through the LAIS Division. In order to gain basic proficiency from their foreign language study, students are encouraged to enroll for at least two semesters in whatever language(s) they elect to take. No student is permitted to take a foreign language that is either his/her native language or second language.

Undergraduate Minors

At the undergraduate level, LAIS offers minors in Literature, Society, and the Environment; International Political Economy; Science, Technology, Engineering, and Policy; Music,Engineering,and Recording Arts and an Individualized Undergraduate minor. See the minor tab for details. LAIS also is the home for the minor in the McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs.

Graduate Degree and Programs

At the graduate level, LAIS offers a 36-hour degree. I also offers Graduate Certificates and Graduate Minors in International Political Economy and Science and Technology. See the Graduate Catalog for details.

Hennebach Program in the Humanities

The Hennebach Program in the Humanities, supported by a major endowment from Ralph Hennebach (Mines Class of 1941), sponsors a regular series of Visiting Professors and the general enhancement of the Humanities on campus. Recent visiting professors have included scholars in Classics, Creative Writing, Environmental Studies, Ethics, History, Literature, Philosophy, and Social Theory as well as the interdisciplinary fields of Environmental Policy, and Science, Technology, and Society Studies. The Program is dedicated to enriching the lives of both students and faculty through teaching and research, with visiting scholars offering courses, giving lectures, conducting workshops, and collaborating on projects. In addition, the Hennebach Program is exploring opportunities for meeting the needs of Undergraduate students who would especially benefit from more focused study in the Humanities that would appropriately complement technical degree curricula.

Writing Center

The LAIS Division operates the Mines Writing Center, which provides students with tutoring tailored to their individual writing problems (including non-native speakers of English). It also provides faculty with support for courses associated with the Writing Across the Curriculum program. Faculty and staff are welcome to make use of the Writing Center's expertise for writing projects and problems. The Writing Center Staff also offers tutoring hours at CASA.  The Writing Center is located on the 1st floor of Alderson Hall in room AH133.

Primary Contact

Jody Lowther
303-384-2590
jlowther@mines.edu

Professors

Elizabeth Van Wie Davis

Kenneth Osgood, Director of McBride Honors Program

Associate Professors

Hussein A. Amery, Interim Division Director

Tina L. Gianquitto

Kathleen J. Hancock

John R. Heilbrunn

Jon Leydens

James D. Straker

Assistant Professors

Adrianne Kroepsch

Jessica Smith

Teaching Professors

Sandy Woodson, Undergraduate Faculty Advisor

Robert Klimek

Toni Lefton

Teaching Associate Professors

Jonathan H. Cullison

Paula A. Farca

Sarah J. Hitt, Associate Director of McBride Honors Program

Cortney E. Holles

Joseph Horan, Assistant Division Director

Derrick Hudson

Rose Pass

Teaching Assistant Professors

Melanie Brandt

Olivia Burgess

Rachel Osgood

Gregory Rulifson

Seth Tucker

Visiting Assistant Professor

Shannon D. Mancus, Hennebach Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Humanities

Professors Emeriti

W. John Cieslewicz

Wilton Eckley

T. Graham Hereford

Barbara M. Olds

Eul-Soo Pang

Anton G. Pegis

Thomas Philipose, University professor emeriti

Arthur B. Sacks

Joseph D. Sneed

Associate Professors Emeriti

Betty J. Cannon

Kathleen H. Ochs

Laura J. Pang

Karen B. Wiley

Curriculum

Key to courses offered by the LAIS Division:

Course Code Course Title
LAISHumanities and Social Sciences
LIFLForeign Language
LIMU Music

CSM students in all majors must take 19 credit hours in Humanities and Social Sciences, ranging from freshman through senior levels of coursework. These courses are housed in the Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies and in the Division of Economics and Business.

Required Core Courses

  1. All Undergraduate students are required to take the following two core courses from the Division of Liberal Arts & International Studies:
    1. LAIS100 Nature and Human Values 4 semester hours
    2. LAIS200 Human Systems 3 semester hours
  2. All Undergraduate students are also required to take EBGN201 Principles of Economics (3 semester hours) from the Division of Economics and Business.

NOTE: Students in the McBride Honors Program must take LAIS100, Nature and Human Values and EBGN201. Please see the McBride Honors Program web site for further information.

Humanities and Social Sciences Requirement

Beyond the core, all Undergraduate students must take an additional three courses (9 semester hours) from the list below. The following restrictions apply to these three courses:

  1. Two of the three courses are midlevel courses, i.e., 200 or 300 level classes. The only exception to this rule are Foreign Language courses (see below). A 400-level course may apply to this midlevel requirement if the student has successfully completed more than one 400-level course.
  2. At least one of the three courses must be a 400-level course. In any given semester, either LAIS or EB may offer 400-level Special Topics courses that will be numbered as either LAIS498 or EBGN498. Even though no Special Topics courses appear in the list below, these courses may be used to fulfill the H&SS General Education restricted electives requirement as follows:
    1. All courses numbered LAIS498 will satisfy the requirement.
    2. Some EBGN498 courses as determined on a case-by-case basis will satisfy the rquirement. Consult EBGN in any given semester for EBGN498 courses that satisfy the requirement.

At least one of the three courses must be taken from the Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies.

A maximum of two Foreign Language courses (LIFL) may be applied toward satisfying the H&SS midlevel requirement. LIFL 498 or 499 Foreign Language courses may not be used to satisfy the 400-level course requirement.

Music (LIMU) courses may not be used to meet the H&SS requirement. They may be used for free elective credit only. A maximum of 3 semester hours of concert band chorus, physical activity, varsity athletics, or other activity credit combined may be used toward free elective credit in a degree granting program.

Single majors in Economics may not use Economics courses to meet the H&SS requirement. Economics majors must meet this requirement with courses from the Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies, as per the above restrictions and requirements. Students other than single majors in Economics may take up to 6 semester hours (2 courses) of approved EBGN courses, listed below, to satisfy the H&SS requirement.

Except for foreign languages, no AP or IB credit can be used to meet the 9 hours of H&SS requirements. AP/IB credits will be applied as free electives.

List of LAIS and EB Courses Satisfying the H&SS Requirement

EBGN301INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS3.0
EBGN302INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS3.0
EBGN310ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS3.0
EBGN320ECONOMICS AND TECHNOLOGY3.0
EBGN330ENERGY ECONOMICS3.0
EBGN340ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY3.0
EBGN342ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT3.0
EBGN437REGIONAL ECONOMICS3.0
EBGN441INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS3.0
EBGN443PUBLIC ECONOMICS3.0
EBGN470ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS3.0
LAIS220INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY3.0
LAIS221INTRODUCTION TO RELIGIONS3.0
LAIS286INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS3.0
LAIS298SPECIAL TOPICS1-6
LAIS300CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION3.0
LAIS301CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY I3.0
LAIS324AUDIO/ACOUSTICAL ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE3.0
LAIS326MUSIC THEORY3.0
LAIS327MUSIC TECHNOLOGY3.0
LAIS328BASIC MUSIC COMPOSITION AND ARRANGING1.0
LAIS330MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE3.0
LAIS305AMERICAN LITERATURE: COLONIAL PERIOD TO THE PRESENT3.0
LAIS307EXPLORATIONS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE3.0
LAIS309LITERATURE AND SOCIETY3.0
LAIS310MODERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE1-3
LAIS311BRITISH LITERATURE: MEDIEVAL TO MODERN3.0
LAIS315MUSICAL TRADITIONS OF THE WESTERN WORLD3.0
LAIS320ETHICS3.0
LAIS322LOGIC3.0
LAIS323INTRODUCTION TO SCIENCE COMMUNICATION3.0
LAIS325CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY3.0
LAIS335INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF LATIN AMERICA3.0
LAIS337INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ASIA3.0
LAIS339INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE MIDDLE EAST3.0
LAIS341INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF AFRICA3.0
LAIS344INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS3.0
LAIS345INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY3.0
LAIS365HISTORY OF WAR3.0
LAIS370HISTORY OF SCIENCE3.0
LAIS371HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY3.0
LAIS375ENGINEERING CULTURES3.0
LAIS377ENGINEERING AND SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT3.0
LAIS398SPECIAL TOPICS1-6
LAIS401CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY II3.0
LAIS404WOMEN, LITERATURE, AND SOCIETY3.0
LAIS406THE LITERATURE OF WAR AND REMEMBRANCE3.0
LAIS407SCIENCE IN LITERATURE3.0
LAIS408LIFE STORIES3.0
LAIS409SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA3.0
LAIS410CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE3.0
LAIS411LITERATURES OF THE AFRICAN WORLD3.0
LAIS412LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT3.0
LAIS415MASS MEDIA STUDIES3.0
LAIS416FILM STUDIES3.0
LAIS418NARRATING THE NATION3.0
LAIS419MEDIA AND THE ENVIRONMENT3.0
LAIS421ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY AND POLICY3.0
LAIS423ADVANCED SCIENCE COMMUNICATION3.0
LAIS430CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY3.0
LAIS431RELIGION & SECURITY3.0
LAIS435LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT3.0
LAIS437ASIAN DEVELOPMENT3.0
LAIS439MIDDLE EAST DEVELOPMENT3.0
LAIS440WAR AND PEACE IN THE MIDDLE EAST3.0
LAIS441AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT3.0
LAIS442NATURAL RESOURCES AND WAR IN AFRICA3.0
LAIS446GLOBALIZATION3.0
LAIS448GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES3.0
LAIS450POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT3.0
LAIS452CORRUPTION AND DEVEL OPMENT3.0
LAIS453ETHNIC CONFLICT IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE3.0
LAIS460GLOBAL GEOPOLITICS3.0
LAIS475ENGINEERING CULTURES IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD3.0
LAIS485CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND POLITICS3.0
LAIS486SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY3.0
LAIS487ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY3.0
LAIS488WATER POLITICS AND POLICY3.0
LAIS489NUCLEAR POWER AND PUBLIC POLICY3.0
LAIS490ENERGY AND SOCIETY3.0
LAIS498SPECIAL TOPICS1-6
LIFL113SPANISH I3.0
LIFL123SPANISH II3.0
LIFL114ARABIC I3.0
LIFL119FRENCH I3.0
LIFL124ARABIC II3.0
LIFL115GERMAN I3.0
LIFL125GERMAN II3.0
LIFL129FRENCH II3.0
LIFLx98 Special Topics

General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.

Minor Programs

The Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies offers several minor programs. Students who elect to pursue a minor usually will satisfy the HSS requirements; however, the Music Technology ASI will not satisfy these requirements. Students will need to use their free elective hours to complete a minor.

A minor requires a minimum of 18 credit-hours; an area of special interest (ASI) requires a minimum of 12 credit hours.  No more than half the credits to be applied towards an LAIS minor or ASI may be transfer credits. The LAIS Undergraduate Faculty Advisor must approve all transfer credits that will be used for an LAIS minor or ASI.

The student must fill out a Minor/Area of Special Interest Declaration (available in the Registrar’s Office) and obtain approval signatures from the student’s CSM advisor, from the Head or Director of the student’s major department or division, and from the LAIS Faculty Undergraduate Advisor. Students should consult the listed advisors for the specific requirements of each minor.

The seven minors or ASI's available and their advisors are

Literature, Society, and the Environment Minor and ASI

Program Advisors: Prof. Tina Gianquitto and Prof. Jay Straker.

The Literature, Society, and the Environment Minor and ASI are designed for students with a passion for literature, and an interest in exploring relationships between literary traditions and the broader social and environmental processes that have helped inspire and shape them. The minor's inter-disciplinary emphasis creates unique opportunities for students to forge connections between literary studies and diverse fields of inquiry, spanning the humanities and qualitative and quantitative sciences. In the process of acquiring the minor, students will develop forms of intellectual creativity and sensitivity to social and environmental dynamics increasingly expected of twenty-first century scientists and engineers.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Students desiring the minor in Literature, Society & the Environment must complete eighteen hours of courses as follows:

1. One required course (3 credit-hours)

LAIS412LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT3.0

2. Three 300-level elective courses, selected from the following (9 credit-hours total):

LAIS300CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION3.0
LAIS301CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY I3.0
LAIS305AMERICAN LITERATURE: COLONIAL PERIOD TO THE PRESENT3.0
LAIS307EXPLORATIONS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE3.0
LAIS309LITERATURE AND SOCIETY3.0
LAIS310MODERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE3.0
LAIS311BRITISH LITERATURE: MEDIEVAL TO MODERN3.0

3. Two 400-level elective courses, selected from the following (6 credit-hours total):

LAIS401CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY II3.0
LAIS404WOMEN, LITERATURE, AND SOCIETY3.0
LAIS406THE LITERATURE OF WAR AND REMEMBRANCE3.0
LAIS407SCIENCE IN LITERATURE3.0
LAIS408LIFE STORIES3.0
LAIS409SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA3.0
LAIS410CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE3.0
LAIS411LITERATURES OF THE AFRICAN WORLD3.0
LAIS416FILM STUDIES3.0
LAIS418NARRATING THE NATION3.0

International Political Economy Minor and ASI

Program Advisor: Prof. James Jesudason.

This minor and ASI are ideal for students anticipating careers in the earth resources industries. The International Political Economy Program at CSM was the first such program in the U.S. designed with the engineering and applied science student in mind, and it remains one of the very few international engineering programs with this focus. International Political Economy is the study of the interplay among politics, the economy, and culture. In today’s global economy, international engineering and applied science decisions are fundamentally political decisions made by sovereign nations. Therefore, International Political Economy theories and models are often used in evaluating and implementing engineering and science projects. Project evaluations and feasibilities now involve the application of such IPE methods as political risk assessment and mitigation. The IPE minor is also a gateway to the Graduate Program in International Political Economy.

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Policy Minor and ASI

The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Policy Minor focuses on science, technology, and engineering in the societal and policy context: how STE influence society, politics, and policy, and how society, politics, and policy influence STE. Courses provide historical, social scientific, ethical, and policy approaches to issues that inevitably confront professional applied scientists, engineers, managers, and administrators in both public and private sectors. Such issues concern, for example, professional ethical responsibilities, intellectual property rights, regulatory regimes, assessments of societal impacts, science policy implementation, and the roles of technical innovation in economic development or international competitiveness. LAIS486 Science and Technology Policy is required. Students work with the STEP Advisor to tailor a sequence of other courses appropriate to their background and interests.

Humanitarian Engineering Minor and ASI

LAIS Advisor: Prof. Juan Lucena.

The Humanitarian Studies Minor and ASI focuses on the intersection of science, technology, and engineering in humanitarian projects. Scientific, technological, and engineering oriented humanitarian projects are intended to help marginalized communities meet basic human needs (such as water, food, and shelter) when these are missing or inadequate. LAIS320 Ethics is required. Other HS courses are offered through LAIS along with selected technical electives by other academic units across campus. Students may also wish to investigate the 28-credit minor in Humanitarian Engineering offered in cooperation with the Division of Engineering.

Minor in Leadership in Social Responsibility

The Minor in Leadership in Social Responsibility will prepare CSM students to become leaders in identifying and promoting the role that engineers can play in advancing social responsibility inside corporations. Graduates will be able to articulate the strategic value of social responsibility for business, particularly in achieving and maintaining the social license to operate, and the role engineering itself can play in advancing a firm’s social responsibility program, including community engagement.

For CSM students to “solve the world’s challenges related to the earth, energy and the environment,” they must also be able to navigate the increasingly complex social, political, and economic contexts that shape those challenges. Achieving the social license to operate, for example, is recognized as necessary for developing mineral resources in the US and abroad. Stewardship of the earth, development of materials, overcoming the earth’s energy challenges, and fostering environmentally sound and sustainable solutions – the bedrock of the Mines vision articulated in the Strategic Plan – requires engineers and applied scientists who are able to work in local and global contexts that are shaped by the sometimes conflicting demands of stakeholders, governments, communities and corporations. Reasoning through and managing these competing demands is at the core of social responsibility.

Curriculum for Minor in Leadership in Social Responsibility (18 credits)

One introductory course from the following (3 credits):

LAIS377ENGINEERING AND SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT3.0
LAIS425INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION 3.0
LAIS475ENGINEERING CULTURES IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD3.0

Three required courses (9 credits):

LAIS430CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY3.0
LAIS479ENGINEERS ENGAGING COMMUNIITES3.0
EGGN401PROJECTS FOR PEOPLE3.0

One HSS elective (3 credits):

LAIS480ANTHROPOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT3.0
LAIS450POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT3.0
LAIS452CORRUPTION AND DEVEL OPMENT3.0
LAIS558NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT3.0

One engineering elective (related to CSR topics, approved by program director) (3 credits):

  1. Approved Petroleum Engineering course, such as
    PEGN350SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS3.0
    PEGN530ENVIRONMENTAL, ENERGY, AND NATURAL RESOURCES LAW3.0
  2. Approved Mining Engineering course, such as
    MNGN308MINE SAFETY1.0
    MNGN470SAFETY AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT IN THE MINING INDUSTRY3.0
    MNGN427MINE VALUATION2.0
    MNGN510FUNDAMENTALS OF MINING AND MINERAL RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT3.0
    MNGN565MINE RISK MANAGEMENT3.0
  3. Approved Environmental Engineering course, such as
    CEEN472ONSITE WATER RECLAMATION AND REUSE3.0
    CEEN475SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING3.0
    CEEN477SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING DESIGN3.0

Minor in Music, Audio Engineering, and the Recording Arts

Program Advisor: Robert Klimek. Program Co-Advisor: Jonathan Cullsion.

The Music, Audio Engineering, and the Recording Arts Minor is designed for students interested in the crossover field between music and related technical skills.  Technical emphasis within this minor creates an opportunity for the student to research/experience the impact of their specific majors upon both music as an art form and music as an industry.  Throughout the minor, students are exposed to the refinements and developments that technology has created in the field of recording, production, sound reinforcement and product design, as well as, the interplay between the arts and technology. The discovery of connections between current music and sound engineering practices is stressed.  The final outcome is a skilled and informed studio musician/technician in present day studio conditions.  Finally, this minor is not designed to expand any current engineering curriculum, but to complement a student’s education.

Students desiring a Music, Audio Engineering, and the Recording Arts Minor must complete 18 hours of courses as follows:

Four required music courses (12 credit-hours):

LAIS324AUDIO/ACOUSTICAL ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE3.0
LAIS327MUSIC TECHNOLOGY3.0
LAIS315MUSICAL TRADITIONS OF THE WESTERN WORLD3.0
LAIS330MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE3.0
Total Semester Hrs12.0

One 400 level required course (3 credit hours):

LAIS429REAL WORLD RECORDING/RESEARCH3.0

Three additional credit-hours:   

LAIS326MUSIC THEORY3.0
Performance Enhancement (3 credit hours total)
LIMU
ENSEMBLE Two semesters
INDIVIDUAL INSTRUMENTAL OR VOCAL MUSIC INSTRUCTION One semester

Individualized Undergraduate Minor

Program Advisor: Prof. Sandy Woodson. Students declaring an Undergraduate Individual Minor in LAIS must choose 18 restricted elective hours in LAIS with a coherent rationale reflecting some explicit focus of study that the student wishes to pursue. A student desiring this minor must design it in consultation with a member of the LAIS faculty who approves the rationale and the choice of courses, eg., pre-law or pre-med courses.

Area of Special Interest in Music Technology

Program Advisor: Prof. Bob Klimek. The Area of Special Interest in Music Technology is comprised of a sequence of courses that allows students to combine interests and abilities in both the science and theory of music production. Completion of this ASI will train students in the technical aspects of the music recording industry, including sound and video recording, sound effects, and software design.

The Guy T. McBride, Jr. Honors Program in Public Affairs

Program Director: Prof. Kenneth Osgood. The curriculum of the McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs offers an honors minor consisting of seminars, courses, and off-campus activities that has the primary goal of providing a select number of students the opportunity to cross the boundaries of their technical expertise into the ethical, cultural, socio-political, and environmental dimensions of human life. Students will develop their skills in communication, critical thinking, and leadership through seminar style classes that explore diverse aspects of the human experience. The seminars allow for a maximum degree of discussion and debate on complex topics. Themes and perspectives from the humanities and the social sciences are integrated with science and engineering to develop in students a sophisticated understanding of the social context in which scientists and engineers work.

Courses

HNRS105. INNOVATION AND DISCOVERY IN ENGINEERING, ARTS, AND SCIENCES I. 3.5 Semester Hrs.

(I) (WI) "Innovation and Discovery in Engineering, Arts, and Sciences" (IDEAS) applies honors pedagogies in a multidisciplinary, integrated environment that highlights the seamless boundaries between science and engineering, design, ethics, and the arts as a path toward making value-informed technical decisions. In addition to developing foundational skills in engineering design and problem-solving, students examine place, identity, citizenship, and community in various contexts as they learn what it means to be an engaged and mindful citizen and professional. IDEAS poses ethical problems and hands-on design challenges from a multitude of lenses. It incorporates experiential learning, team-based projects, and seminar discussions to encourage students to think both critically and creatively about their world. Students must pass both HNRS105 and HNRS 115 to meet degree requirements. If students drop either of these courses, they must take both LAIS100 and EPIC151 or their equivalents in order to graduate. 3 hours lecture; 1.5 hours lab; 3.5 semester hours.

HNRS115. INNOVATION AND DISCOVERY IN ENGINEERING, ARTS, AND SCIENCES II. 3.5 Semester Hrs.

(II) (WI) "Innovation and Discovery in Engineering, Arts, and Sciences" (IDEAS) applies honors pedagogies in a multidisciplinary, integrated environment that highlights the seamless boundaries between science and engineering, design, ethics, and the arts as a path toward making value-informed technical decisions. Students examine place, identity, citizenship, and community in various contexts as they learn what it means to be an engaged and mindful citizen and professional. IDEAS poses ethical problems and hands-on design challenges from a multitude of lenses. It incorporates experiential learning, team-based projects, and seminar discussions to encourage students to think both critically and creatively about their world. Students must pass both HNRS105 and HNRS115 to meet degree requirements. If students drop either of these courses, they must take both LAIS100 and EPIC151 or their equivalents in order to graduate. Prerequisites: HNRS105. 3 hours lecture; 1.5 hours lab; 3.5 semester hours.

HNRS198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

A Special Topics course will be a pilot course in the McBride curriculum or will be offered as an enhancement to regularly-scheduled McBride seminars. Special Topics courses in the McBride curriculum will not be offered more than twice. Variable credit: 1 - 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

HNRS199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

Under special circumstances, a McBride student may use this course number to register for an independent study project which substitutes for or enhances the regularly-scheduled McBride curriculum seminars. Variable credit: 1 - 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

HNRS298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

A Special Topics course will be a pilot course in the McBride curriculum or will be offered as an enhancement to regularly-scheduled McBride seminars. Special Topics courses in the McBride curriculum will not be offered more than twice. Variable credit: 1 - 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

HNRS299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

Under special circumstances, a McBride student may use this course number to register for an independent study project which substitutes for or enhances the regularly-scheduled McBride curriculum seminars. Variable credit: 1 - 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

HNRS305. EXPLORATIONS IN MODERN AMERICA. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) (WI) Honors core course that develops student skills in reading, writing, critical thinking, and oral communication. skills through the exploration of selected topics related to the social, cultural, and political ideas and events that have shaped the development of the modern United States and its role in the world. Prerequisite: Admission to the Program and LAIS100: Nature & Human Values. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

HNRS315. EXPLORATIONS IN THE MODERN WORLD. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) (WI) Honors core course that develops student writing skills and critical thinking abilities through the exploration of selected topics related to the social, cultural, and political ideas and developments that have shaped the modern world. Prerequisite: Admission to the Program and LAIS100: Nature & Human Values. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

HNRS398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE MCBRIDE HONORS PROGRAM IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

A Special Topics course will be a pilot course in the McBride curriculum or will be offered as an enhancement to regularly-scheduled McBride seminars. Special Topics courses in the McBride curriculum will not be offered more than twice. Variable credit: 1 - 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

HNRS399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

Under special circumstances, a McBride student may use this course number to register for an independent study project which substitutes for or enhances the regularly-scheduled McBride curriculum seminars. Variable credit: 1 - 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

HNRS405. MCBRIDE PRACTICUM. 1-3 Semester Hr.

(I, II) (WI) With approval of the Program, a McBride student may enroll in an individualized study project which substitutes for or enhances the regularly-scheduled McBride curriculum seminars. This option may be used to pursue an approved foreign study program, service learning program, international internship, undergraduate research project, or other authorized experiential learning program of study. Students must also prepare a faculty-guided major research paper that integrates the experience with the goals, objectives, and focus of the Honors Program in Public Affairs. 1-3 semester hours. Repeatable up to 6 hours.

HNRS425. EXPLORATIONS IN POLITICS, POLICY, AND LEADERSHIP. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) (WI) Study of selected topics related to policy, politics, and/or leadership through case studies, readings, research, and writing. Prerequisites: HNRS305: Explorations in Modern America and HNRS315: Explorations in The Modern World. Repeatable for credit up to a maximum of 6 hours. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

HNRS430. EXPLORATIONS IN IDEAS, ETHICS, AND RELIGION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) (WI) Study of selected topics related to ideas, ethics, and/or religion through case studies, readings, research, and writing. Prerequisites: HNRS305: Explorations in Modern America and HNRS315: Explorations in the Modern World. Repeatable for credit up to a maximum of 6 hours. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

HNRS435. EXPLORATIONS IN CULTURE, SOCIETY, AND CREATIVE ARTS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) (WI) Study of selected topics related to culture, society, and/or the creative arts through case studies, readings, research, and writing. Prerequisites: HNRS305: Explorations in Modern America and HNRS315: Explorations in the Modern World. Repeatable for credit up to a maximum of 6 hours. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

HNRS440. EXPLORATIONS IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES & GLOBAL AFFAIRS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) (WI) Study of selected topics related to international studies and/or global affairs through case studies, readings, research, and writing. Prerequisites: HNRS305: Explorations in Modern America and HNRS315: Explorations in the Modern World. Repeatable for credit up to a maximum of 6 hours. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

HNRS445. EXPLORATIONS IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) (WI) Study of selected topics related to the relationships between science, technology, and society through case studies, readings, research, and writing. Prerequisites: HNRS305: Explorations in Modern America and HNRS315: Explorations in the Modern World. Repeatable for credit up to a maximum of 6 hours. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

HNRS450. EXPLORATIONS IN EARTH, ENERGY, AND ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) (WI) Study of selected topics related to earth, energy, and/or the environment through case studies, readings, research, and writing. This course may focus on the human dimensions or broader impacts of science, technology, engineering, or mathematics. Prerequisites: HNRS305: Explorations in Modern America and HNRS315: Explorations in the Modern World. Repeatable for credit up to a maximum of 6 hours. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

HNRS476. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT THROUGH SERVICE LEARNING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Community Engagement through Service Learning combines a traditional classroom environment with an off campus learning experience with a local non-profit or community organization. Students spend 3-4 hours per week serving the organization they choose and meet in class once per week to discuss reading assignments, present research findings, and share experiences and insights about the course material. Instructors may choose to focus on a particular topic or social issue, such as poverty and privilege, or may engage with community issues more broadly. The course focuses on several aspects of a student?s learning, including intra- and interpersonal learning, discovering community, and developing communication skills and critical and interdisciplinary approaches. Course work will focus on critical reading, group discussion and deliberation, oral presentations of research, and writing assignments. Prerequisites: none. 2 hours lecture; 3-4 hours lab; 3.0 semester hours.

HNRS497. SUMMER COURSE. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

HNRS498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE MCBRIDE HONORS PROGRAM IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

A Special Topics course will be a pilot course in the McBride curriculum or will be offered as an enhancement to regularly-scheduled McBride seminars. Special Topics courses in the McBride curriculum will not be offered more than twice. Variable credit: 1 - 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

HNRS499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

Under special circumstances, a McBride student may use this course number to register for an independent study project which substitutes for or enhances the regularly-scheduled McBride curriculum seminars. Variable credit: 1 - 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

LAIS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with LIHU100,
Nature and Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life and Nature, and their interdependence. The course will examine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How have human actions, values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and examples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will include but are not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society. This is a writing-intensive course that will provide instruction and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester hours.

LAIS198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LAIS199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LAIS200. HUMAN SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with SYGN200,
(I, II) Part of the CSM core curriculum, following the first-year requirement of LAIS 100 Nature and Human Values. This course examines political, economic, social, and cultural systems on a global scale during the modern era. Topics covered include development patterns in key regions of the world; the causes and outcomes of globalization; and the influence of energy, technology, and resources on development. Course material presented by instructors with social science and humanities disciplinary backgrounds, with weekly readings and evaluation through exams and written essays. Prerequisite: LAIS 100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS201. WORKSHOP FOUNDATIONS: THE ART AND CRAFT OF CREATIVE WRITING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) (WI) This course examines the major patterns of modern and contemporary written forms. Topics analyzed include poetics, prose and creative nonfiction, and the personal or lyric essay. Poetics will focus on writing from imagism to modernism to beat and hippy writing, up to contemporary and postmodern poetry. Prose writing will examine the development of the shorts story from inception to contemporary approaches. Analysis of historical trends and change will also serve as a basis for developing student writing habits and strategies. Over the course of the semester, these subjects will be addressed through seminars, readings, workshops, and in-class discussion and activities. Prerequisites: LAIS100. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS220. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A general introduction to philosophy that explores historical and analytic traditions. Historical exploration may compare and contrast ancient and modern, rationalist and empiricist, European and Asian approaches to philosophy. Analytic exploration may consider such basic problems as the distinction between illusion and reality, the one and the many, the structure of knowledge, the existence of God, the nature of mind or self. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit hours.

LAIS221. INTRODUCTION TO RELIGIONS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course has two focuses. We will look at selected religions emphasizing their popular, institutional, and contemplative forms; these will be four or five of the most common religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and/or Islam. The second point of the course focuses on how the Humanities and Social Sciences work. We will use methods from various disciplines to study religion-history of religions and religious thought, sociology, anthropology and ethnography, art history, study of myth, philosophy, analysis of religious texts and artifacts (both contemporary and historical), analysis of material culture and the role it plays in religion, and other disciplines and methodologies. We will look at the question of objectivity; is it possible to be objective? We will approach this methodological question using the concept ?standpoint.? For selected readings, films, and your own writings, we will analyze what the ?standpoint? is. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS226. BEGINNING CLASS PIANO AND FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) LAIS 226 is a beginning keyboard class. Students will learn to read music, develop fundamental keyboard skills, grasp basic music theory and history concepts, and understand the communal nature of music through ensemble preparation and public performance. Assessment will be based on class participation, written exams, student reflection papers, written and aural homework assignments, and public performances in class. The course will be a recommended, but not required, prerequisite for LAIS326 (Music Theory) and LAIS328 (Basic Music Composition and Arranging). Prerequisites: LAIS100. Co-requisites: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS286. INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Introduction to Government and Politics is a beginning- level course intended to familiarize students with the study of politics across societies. The method is comparative in that it approaches the task of studying the world's different political systems by contrasting and comparing them along different dimensions, and by seeking generalizations about them. The class focuses on cases, topics, and methodologies in American and comparative politics. No background in political science is required or expected. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LAIS299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LAIS300. CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Students will write weekly exercises and read their work for the pleasure and edification of the class. The midterm in this course will be the production of a short story. The final will consist of a completed, revised short story. The best of these works may be printed in a future collection. Prerequisite: LAIS 100. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS301. CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY I. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course focuses on reading and writing poetry. Students will learn many different poetic forms to compliment prosody, craft, and technique. Aesthetic preferences will be developed as the class reads, discusses, and models some of the great American poets. Weekly exercises reflect specific poetic tools, encourage the writing of literary poetry, and stimulate the development of the student?s craft. The purpose of the course is to experience the literature and its place in a multicultural society, while students ?try on? various styles and contexts in order to develop their own voice. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS305. AMERICAN LITERATURE: COLONIAL PERIOD TO THE PRESENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course offers an overview of American literature from the colonial period to the present. The texts of the class provide a context for examining the traditions that shape the American nation as a physical, cultural and historical space. As we read, we will focus on the relationships between community, landscape, history, and language in the American imagination. We will concentrate specifically on conceptions of the nation and national identity in relation to race, gender, and class difference. Authors may include: Rowlandson, Brown, Apess, Hawthorne, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, James, Stein, Eliot, Hemingway, Silko, and Auster. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS307. EXPLORATIONS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course examines major figures and themes in the modern literatures of Africa, the Caribbean, and Latin America. Reading, discussion and writing will focus on fiction and poetry representing Francophone, Arabic, and Hispanophone traditions within these world regions. Engaging these texts will foster understanding of some of the pivotal philosophical, political, and aesthetic debates that have informed cultural practices in diverse colonial territories and nation-states. Thematic and stylistic concerns will include imperialism, nationalism, existentialism, Orientalism, negritude, and social and magical realisms. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS309. LITERATURE AND SOCIETY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Before the emergence of sociology as a distinct field of study, literary artists had long been investigating the seemingly infinite complexity of human societies, seeking to comprehend the forces shaping collective identities, socio-cultural transformations, technological innovations, and political conflicts. Designed to enrich recognition and understanding of the complex interplay of artistic creativity and social inquiry over time, this course compares influential literary and social-scientific responses to the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, and other dynamic junctures integral to the forging of "modernity" and the volatile world we inhabit today. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS310. MODERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE. 1-3 Semester Hr.

This course will introduce students to some of the major figures and generative themes of post-Enlightenment European and British literature. Reading, discussion, and writing will focus on fiction, poetry, drama, and critical essays representing British, French, Germanic, Italian, Czech, and Russian cultural traditions. Engaging these texts will foster understanding of some of the pivotal philosophical, political, and aesthetic movements and debates that have shaped modern European society and culture. Thematic concerns will include the French Enlightenment and its legacies, imperialism within and beyond Europe, comparative totalitarianisms, the rise of psychoanalytic theory and existentialism, and modernist and postmodern perspectives on the arts. Prerequisite: LAIS100, prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS311. BRITISH LITERATURE: MEDIEVAL TO MODERN. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to early modernists in light of major developments in scientific thought. It considers topics such as medieval medicine and astrology in The Canterbury Tales, reflections of Copernicus' new astronomy in Shakespearean tragedy and John Donne's poetry, the tumultuous career of Newtonian physics across the Enlightenment and Romanticism, the struggle with Darwinian evolution in Victorian literature, and early 20th century reactions to anthropology and psychoanalysis. Pre-requisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS315. MUSICAL TRADITIONS OF THE WESTERN WORLD. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

An introduction to music of the Western world from its beginnings to the present. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS320. ETHICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with BELS320,
A general introduction to ethics that explores its analytic and historical traditions. Reference will commonly be made to one or more significant texts by such moral philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Kant, John Stuart Mill, and others. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS322. LOGIC. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A general introduction to logic that explores its analytic and historical traditions. Coverage will commonly consider informal and formal fallacies, syllogistic logic, sentential logic, and elementary quantification theory. Reference will commonly be made to the work of such logical theorists as Aristotle, Frege, Russell and Whitehead, Quine, and others. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS323. INTRODUCTION TO SCIENCE COMMUNICATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course will explore the relationship between science and the public through an examination of science writing and communication on current events. Students will study various forms of science communication, including essays, blogs, news segments, media clips, and radio programs in order to understand the ways in which science is communicated beyond the lab or university and into the public consciousness. Science writing often explores the human condition, reflects on hopes and worries about technology, and informs our collective knowledge about the world. Students will discuss the implications of this kind of communication, analyze breakdowns in communication through case studies, and write for peer and popular audiences, including turning a lab report into a short feature article and writing a science essay. Prerequisites: LAIS100, and pre- or co-requisite of LAIS200 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS324. AUDIO/ACOUSTICAL ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Audio/acoustical engineering and science teaches concepts surrounding the production, transmission, manipulation and reception of audible sound. These factors play a role in many diverse areas such as the design of modern music technology products, recording studios and loudspeakers, civil engineering and building design, and industrial safety. This course will explore and concepts of this field and the physics/mechanics that are involved, as well as aesthetic impacts related to the subject matter. Discussion of human anatomy and psycho acoustic phenomena are also presented. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200.

LAIS325. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A study of the social behavior and cultural devel opment of humans. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS326. MUSIC THEORY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) The course begins with the fundamentals of music theory and moves into more complex applications. Music of the common practice period (18th century) and beyond is considered. Aural and visual recognition of harmonic material is emphasized. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200.

LAIS327. MUSIC TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) An introduction to the physics of music and sound. The history of music technology from wax tubes to synthesizers. Construction of instruments and studio. 3 hours lecture. 3 semester hours. Prerequisite: LAIS 100; Pre-or Co-requisite: LAIS200.

LAIS328. BASIC MUSIC COMPOSITION AND ARRANGING. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I) This course begins with the fundamentals of music composition and works towards basic vocal and instrumental arrangement skills. Upon completion of this course the student should: 1) Demonstrate basic knowledge of (music) compositional techniques; 2) Demonstrate primary concepts of vocal and instrumental ensemble arrangement; 3) Demonstrate an ability to use notational software and Midi station hardware. 1 semester hour; repeatable for credit. Pre-requisite: LAIS 100; Pre-or Co-requisite: LAIS200.

LAIS330. MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Project-based course designed to develop practical technological and communication skills for direct application to the music recording. 3 credit hours. Prerequisites: LAIS100, LAIS324, LAIS326, and LAIS327. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200.

LAIS335. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF LATIN AMERICA. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A broad survey of the interrelationship between the state and economy in Latin America as seen through an examination of critical contemporary and historical issues that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given to the dynamics of interstate relationships between the developed North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS337. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ASIA. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A broad survey of the interrelationship between the state and economy in East and Southeast Asia as seen through an examination of critical contemporary and historical issues that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given to the dynamics of interstate relationships between the developed North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS339. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE MIDDLE EAST. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A broad survey of the interrelationships between the state and market in the Middle East as seen through an examination of critical contemporary and historical issues that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given to the dynamics between the developed North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS341. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF AFRICA. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A broad survey of the interrelationships between the state and market in Africa as seen through an examination of critical contem porary and historical issues that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given to the dynamics between the developed North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS344. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course surveys major topics and theories of international relations. Students will evaluate diverse perspectives and examine a variety of topics including war and peace, economic globalization, human rights and international law, international environmental issues, and the role of the US as the current superpower. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS345. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

International Political Economy is a study of contentious and harmonious relationships between the state and the market on the nation-state level, between individual states and their markets on the regional level, and between region-states and region-markets on the global level. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS365. HISTORY OF WAR. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

History of War looks at war primarily as a significant human activity in the history of the Western World since the times of Greece and Rome to the present. The causes, strategies, results, and costs of various wars will be covered, with considerable focus on important military and political leaders as well as on noted historians and theoreticians. The course is primarily a lecture course with possible group and individual presentations as class size permits. Tests will be both objective and essay types. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS370. HISTORY OF SCIENCE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

An introduction to the social history of science, exploring significant people, theories, and social practices in science, with special attention to the histories of physics, chemistry, earth sciences, ecology, and biology. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS371. HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A survey of the history of technology in the modern period (from roughly 1700 to the present), exploring the role technology has played in the political and social history of countries around the world. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS375. ENGINEERING CULTURES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course seeks to improve students? abilities to understand and assess engineering problem solving from different cultural, political, and historical perspectives. An exploration, by comparison and contrast, of engineering cultures in such settings as 20th century United States, Japan, former Soviet Union and presentday Russia, Europe, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS376. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT THROUGH SERVICE LEARNING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Community Engagement through Service Learning combines a traditional classroom environment with an off campus learning experience with a local non-profit or community organization. Students spend 3-4 hours per week serving the organization they choose and meet in class once per week to discuss reading assignments, present research findings, and share experiences and insights about the course material. Instructors may choose to focus on a particular topic or social issue, such as poverty and privilege, or may engage with community issues more broadly. The course focuses on several aspects of a student?s learning, including intra- and interpersonal learning, discovering community, and developing communication skills and critical and interdisciplinary approaches. Course work will focus on critical reading, group discussion and deliberation, oral presentations of research, and writing assignments. Prerequisites: none. 2 hours lecture; 3-4 hours lab; 3.0 semester hours.

LAIS377. ENGINEERING AND SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course is an introduction to the relationship between engineering and sustainable community development (SCD) from historical, political, ideological, ethical, cultural, and practical perspectives. Students will study and analyze different dimensions of community and sustainable development and the role that engineering might play in them. Also students will critically explore strengths and limitations of dominant methods in engineering problem solving, design, and research for working in SCD. Students will learn to research, describe, analyze and evaluate case studies in SCD and develop criteria for their evaluation. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LAIS399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LAIS401. CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course is a continuation of LAIS301 for those interested in developing their poetry writing further. It focuses on reading and writing poetry. Students will learn many different poetic forms to compliment prosody, craft, and technique. Aesthetic preferences will be developed as the class reads, discusses, and models some of the great American poets. Weekly exercises reflect specific poetic tools, encourage the writing of literary poetry, and simulate the development of the student?s craft. The purpose of the course is to experience the literature and its place in a multicultural society, while students ?try on? various styles and contexts in order to develop their own voice. Prerequisite: LAIS100 and LAIS301. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS404. WOMEN, LITERATURE, AND SOCIETY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This reading and writing intensive course examines the role that women writers have played in a range of literary traditions. Far from residing in the margins of key national debates, women writers have actively contributed their voices to demands for social, racial, economic, and artistic equality. We will examine the writing produced by women from a diversity of racial, ethnic, and social backgrounds, as we examine the ways in which women writers respond to the various pressures placed on them as artists and activists. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS406. THE LITERATURE OF WAR AND REMEMBRANCE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

In "The Literature of War and Remembrance," students survey poetry, prose, and film ranging from classicial to contemporary war literature. The course considers literary depictions of the individual and society in war and its aftermath. Critical reading and writing skills are demonstrated in creative presentations and analytical essays. Students will investigate war literature and commemorative art inspired by recent world conflicts, and place a contemporary work into the thematic structure of the course. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS407. SCIENCE IN LITERATURE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Science fiction often serves as a cautionary tale that deals with the darker side of humanity's desires in order to find a better understanding of who we are and what we hope to become. This class examines scientific and social progress as it is imagined by some of the greatest authors of the genre. We will examine the current events that may have influenced the writing and position our lens to the scientific and technological breakthroughs, as well as the social, cultural, and political state of the world at the time of our readings. This course focuses on classic science fiction from the late 1800's to the present which may include: Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jack Williamson, Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Alfred Bester, Philip Jose Farmer, Marion Zimmer Bradley, Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, William Gibson, Arthur C. Clarke, Ursula K. LeGuin and Mary Doria Russell, among others. Prerequisite: LAIS100, Co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS408. LIFE STORIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Using texts by published authors and members of the class, we will explore the pleasures and challenges of creating and interpreting narratives based on "real life." The class will consider critical theories about the relationship between the self and the stories we tell. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Pre-requisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS409. SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Shakespeare, the most well known writer in English and perhaps the world, deals with universal themes and the ultimate nature of what it is to be a human being. His plays are staged, filmed, and read around the globe, even after 400 years. This seminar will explore why Shakespeare?s plays and characters have such lasting power and meaning to humanity. The seminar will combine class discussion, lecture, and video. Grades will be based on participation, response essays, and a final essay. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS410. CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course introduces students to texts and cultural productions of the 20th Century literature. We will examine a diverse collection of materials, including novels and short stories, poems, plays, films, painting, and sculpture. Science, technology, violence, history, identity, language all come under the careful scrutiny of the authors we will discuss in this course, which may include Conrad, Fanon, Achebe, Eliot, Kafka, Barnes, Camus, Borges, and Marquez, among others. We will also screen films that comment upon the fragility of individual identity in the face of modern technology. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS411. LITERATURES OF THE AFRICAN WORLD. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course examines wide-ranging writers' depictions of collective transformations and conflicts integral to the making and remaking of African and Afro-diasporic communities worldwide. Fiction, poetry, and essays representing diverse linguistic, aesthetic, and philosophical traditions will constitute the bulk of the reading. Alongside their intrinsic expressive values, these texts illuminate religious and popular cultural practices important to social groups throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States. Primary socio-historical themes may include the slave trade, plantation cultures, generational consciousness, ethnicity, gender relations, urbanization, and collective violence. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS412. LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This reading and writing intensive course investigates the human connection to the environment in a broad range of literary materials. Discussions focus on the role of place - of landscape as physical, cultural, moral, historical space - and on the relationship between landscape and community, history, and language in the environmental imagination. Readings include texts that celebrate the natural world, those that indict the careless use of land and resources, and those that predict and depict the consequences of that carelessness. Additionally, we investigate philosophical, legal, and policy frameworks that shape approaches to environmental issues. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requesite LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS415. MASS MEDIA STUDIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This introduction to mass media studies is designed to help students become more active interpreters of mass media messages, primarily those that emanate from television, radio, the Internet, sound recordings (music), and motions pictures (film, documentary, etc.). Taking a broad rhetorical and sociological perspective, the course examines a range of mass media topics and issues. Students should complete this course with enhanced rhetorical and sociological understandings of how media shapes individuals, societies, and cultures as well as how those groups shape the media. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS416. FILM STUDIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course introduces students to the basics of film history, form, and criticism. Students will be exposed to a variety of film forms, including documentary, narrative, and formalist films, and will be encouraged to discuss and write about these forms using critical film language. Students will have an opportunity to work on their own film projects and to conduct research into the relationship between films and their historical, cultural, and ideological origins. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS418. NARRATING THE NATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

The novel, nationalism, and the modern nation-state share the same eighteenth and nineteenth-century roots. Relationships between the works of novelists, local nationalisms, and state politics have, however, always been volatile. These tensions have assumed particularly dramatic expressive and political forms in Latin America and postcolonial South Asia and Africa. This course examines the inspirations, stakes, and ramifications of celebrated novelists' explorations of the conflicted and fragmentary character their own and/or neighboring nationstates. Beyond their intrinsic literary values, these texts illuminate distinctive religious, ritual, and popular cultural practices that have shaped collective imaginings of the nation, as well as oscillations in nationalist sentiment across specific regions and historical junctures. Studies in relevant visual media -films, paintings, and telenovelas - will further our comparative inquiry into the relationships between artistic narrative and critical perspectives on "the nation." Alongside the focal literary and visual texts, the course will address major historians' and social theorists' accounts of the origins, spread, and varied careers of nationalist thought and practice across our modern world. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS419. MEDIA AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course explores the ways that messages about the environment and environmentalism are communicated in the mass media, fine arts, and popular culture. The course will introduce students to key readings in environmental communication, media studies, and cultural studies in order to understand the many ways in which the images, messages, and politics of environmentalism and the natural world are constructed. Students will analyze their role as science communicators and will participate in the creation of communication projects related to environmental research on campus or beyond. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS421. ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY AND POLICY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A critical examination of environmental ethics and the philosophical theories on which they depend. Topics may include preservation/conservation, animal welfare, deep ecology, the land ethic, eco-feminism, environmental justice, sustainability, or non-western approaches. This class may also include analyses of select, contemporary environmental issues. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS423. ADVANCED SCIENCE COMMUNICATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course will examine historical and contemporary case studies in which science communication (or miscommunication) played key roles in shaping policy outcomes and/or public perceptions. Examples of cases might include the recent controversies over hacked climate science emails, nuclear power plant siting controversies, or discussions of ethics in classic environmental cases, such as the Dioxin pollution case. Students will study, analyze, and write about science communication and policy theories related to scientific uncertainty; the role of the scientist as communicator; and media ethics. Students will also be exposed to a number of strategies for managing their encounters with the media, as well as tools for assessing their communication responsibilities and capacities. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS424. RHETORIC, ENERGY AND PUBLIC POLICY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course will examine the ways in which rhetoric shapes public policy debates on energy. Students will learn how contemporary rhetorical and public policy theory illuminates debates that can affect environmental, economic and/or socio-cultural aspects of energy use, transportation and production. 3 hour seminar; 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: LAIS 100; Pre-or Co-requisite: LAIS200.

LAIS425. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) The course examines intercultural communication theory and practice. In particular, the course provides students with a window into how intercultural (mis)communication cases arise, evolve, and are resolved. Students investigate communication cases and issues across a broad range of cultural divides, such as national, ethnic, gender, and social class cultures. Some case studies are situated in engineering and applied science contexts. Prerequisites: LAIS100. Co-requisites: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS426. SCIENTIFIC CONTROVERSIES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) Examines national and international, historical and contemporary scientific and engineering controversies. In particular, the course provides students with a window into how scientific controversies arise, evolve, and are resolved both within scientific circles and in the public arena. By exploring case studies of such controversies, students gain a better understanding about how scientific controversies shape and are shaped by communication as well as by public policy. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Corequisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

LAIS429. REAL WORLD RECORDING/RESEARCH. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(WI) This reading and writing-intensive course explores the acoustical, musical, and technical aspects of recording a variety of live ethno-musicological music genres and/or performances, towards the purpose of learning how to research, document and capture the most accurate and authentic recording. Historical research, non-traditional recording techniques; archival documentation, and editing will all be a part of this course. Prerequisites: LAIS100 and either LAIS315 or LAIS327. Co-requisites: LAIS200. 3 semester hours.

LAIS430. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Businesses are largely responsible for creating the wealth upon which the well-being of society depends. As they create that wealth, their actions impact society, which is composed of a wide variety of stakeholders. In turn, society shapes the rules and expectations by which businesses must navigate their internal and external environments. This interaction between corporations and society (in its broadest sense) is the concern of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). This course explores the dimensions of that interaction from a multi-stakeholder perspective using case studies, guest speakers and field work. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS431. RELIGION & SECURITY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course introduces students to the central topics in religion and society. It defines civil society in 21st century contexts and connects this definition with leading debates about the relationship of religion and security. IT creates an understanding of diverse religious traditions from the perspective of how they view security. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture and descission; 3 semester hours.

LAIS433. SHAKESPEARE AND THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) (WI) This course investigates ways in which William Shakespeare, a contemporary of Galileo, reflects in his work scientific theories and discoveries emerging during the Renaissance that transformed long-held world views. Shakespeare presents characters encountering unprecedented challenges interpreting their own relationship to the natural world and the political world, the spiritual world and the New World, the world of arts and the human imagination. Because the Renaissance concept of science is so broad and multi-disciplinary, students will be able to pursue individual interests in their research for this course. Prerequisites: LAIS100. Co-requisites: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS435. LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A seminar designed to explore the political economy of current and recent past development strategies, models, efforts, and issues in Latin America, one of the most dynamic regions of the world today. Development is understood to be a nonlinear, complex set of processes involving political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental factors whose ultimate goal is to improve the quality of life for individuals. The role of both the state and the market in development processes will be examined. Topics to be covered will vary as changing realities dictate but will be drawn from such subjects as inequality of income distribution; the role of education and health care; region-markets; the impact of globalization, institution-building, corporate-community-state interfaces, neoliberalism, privatization, democracy, and public policy formulation as it relates to development goals. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS437. ASIAN DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This international political economy seminar deals with the historical development of Asia Pacific from agrarian to post-industrial eras; its economic, political, and cultural transformation since World War II, contemporary security issues that both divide and unite the region; and globalization processes that encourage Asia Pacific to forge a single trading bloc. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hoursseminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS439. MIDDLE EAST DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This internationa political economy seminar analyzes economic, political and social dynamics that affect the progress and direction of states, markets, and peoples of the region. It examines the development of the Middle East from agrarian to post-industrial societies; economic, political and cultural transformations since World War II; contemporary security issues that both divide and unite the region; and the effects of globalization processes on economies and societies in the Middle East. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS440. WAR AND PEACE IN THE MIDDLE EAST. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course introduces students to theories of war and then discusses a select number of historical wars and contemporary ones. It also analyzes efforts at peace-making efforts and why some fail and others succeed. The global consequences of war and peace in the Middle East will be explored in terms of oil supply and of other geostrategic interests that America has in that region. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS441. AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course provides a broad overview of the political economy of Africa. Its goal is to give students an understanding of the possibilities of African development and the impediments that currently block its economic growth. Despite substantial natural resources, mineral reserves, and human capital, most African countries remain mired in poverty. The struggles that have arisen on the continent have fostered thinking about the curse of natural resources where countries with oil or diamonds are beset with political instability and warfare. Readings give first an introduction to the continent followed by a focus on the specific issues that confront African development today. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS442. NATURAL RESOURCES AND WAR IN AFRICA. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Africa possesses abundant natural resources yet suffers civil wars and international conflicts based on access to resource revenues. The course examines the distinctive history of Africa, the impact of the resource curse, mismanagement of government and corruption, and specific cases of unrest and war in Africa. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS446. GLOBALIZATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This international political economy seminar is an historical and contemporary analysis of globalization processes examined through selected issues of world affairs of political, economic, military, and diplomatic significance. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS448. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Critical examination of interactions between development and the environment and the human dimensions of global change; social, cpolitical, economic, and cultural responses to the management and preservation of natural resources and ecosystems on a global scale. Exploration of the meaning and implications of ?Stewardship of the Earth? and ?Sustainable Development.? Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS450. POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course will review the existing methodologies and techniques of risk assessment in both country-specific and global environments. It will also seek to design better ways of assessing and evaluating risk factors for business and public diplomacy in the increasingly globalized context of economy and politics wherein the role of the state is being challenged and redefined. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. Prerequisite: At least one IPE 300- or 400-level course. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS451. POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT RESEARCH SEMINAR. 1.0 Semester Hr.

This international political economy seminar must be taken concurrently with LAIS450, Political Risk Assessment. Its purpose is to acquaint the student with empirical research methods and sources appropriate to conducting a political risk assessment study, and to hone the students' analytical abilities. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: LAIS200. Concurrent enrollment in LAIS450. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.

LAIS452. CORRUPTION AND DEVEL OPMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course addresses the problem of corruption and its impact on development. Readings are multi disciplinary and include policy studies, economics, and political science. Students will acquire an understanding of what constitutes corruption, how it negatively affects development, and what they, as engineers in a variety of professional circumstances, might do in circumstances in which bribe paying or bribe taking might occur. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS453. ETHNIC CONFLICT IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Many scholars used to believe that with modernization, racial, religious, and cultural antagonisms would weaken as individuals developed more rational outlooks and gave primacy to their economic concerns. Yet, with the waning of global ideological conflict of the left-right nature, conflict based on cultural and "civilization" differences have come to the fore in both developing and developed countries. This course will examine ethnic conflict, broadly conceived, in a variety of contexts. Case studies will include the civil war in Yugoslavia, the LA riots, the antagonism between the Chinese and "indigenous' groups in Southeast, the so-called war between the West and Islam, and ethnic relations in the U.S. We will consider ethnic contention in both institutionalized, political processes, such as the politics of affirmative action, as well as in non-institutionalized, extra-legal settings, such as ethnic riots, pogroms, and genocide. We will end by asking what can be done to mitigate ethnic conflict and what might be the future of ethnic group identification. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS456. POWER AND POLITICS IN EURASIA. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This seminar covers the major internal and international issues confronting the fifteen states that once comprised the Soviet Union. After an overview of the USSR and its collapse in 1991, the course explores subsequent economic and security dilemmas facing the "new" nations of Eurasia. Special attention will be paid to oil, natural gas, and other energy sectors in the region. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS457. INTRODUCTION TO CONFLICT MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course introduces students to central topics in conflict management. It assesses the causes of contemporary conflicts with an initial focus on weak states, armed insurgencies, and ethnic conflict. It then examines a range of peace-building efforts, and strategies for reconstructing post-conflict states. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS460. GLOBAL GEOPOLITICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This seminar examines geopolitical competition between great and aspiring powers for influence, control over land and natural resources, critical geo-strategic trade routes, or even infrastructure. Using empirical evidence from case studies, students develop a deeper understanding of the interconnections between the political, economic, social, cultural and geographic dimensions of foreign policies, as well as issues of war and peace.Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 credit hours.

LAIS464. HISTORY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This course examines the major patterns of human energy use and interaction with the natural environment on a global scale from the origins of civilization to the present day. Topics analyzed include the dynamics of historical change in energy and resource use, the ways in which energy and the environment have shaped the development of past societies, cultural perceptions of energy and the environment during different historical eras, and the impact of past human activities on natural systems. Analysis of historical trends will also serve as a basis for discussions related to current issues in energy and the environment. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture/seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS467. HISTORY OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course provides an overview of the history of some of the key sciences that help us understand the world we inhabit: geology, climatology, evolutionary biology, and ecology. As we investigate key scientific discoveries of the modern era, we will also consider the philosophical and cultural impacts of those scientific discoveries. Thus, our reading will include not only original texts by scientists, but also key literary, historical and other texts inspired by those discoveries. Prerequisites: LAIS100. Co-requisites: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS475. ENGINEERING CULTURES IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

An investigation and assessment of engineering problem-solving in the developing world using historical and cultural cases. Countries to be included range across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS478. ENGINEERING AND SOCIAL JUSTICE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This course offers students the opportunity to explore the relationships between engineering and social justice. The course begins with students? exploration of their own social locations, alliances and resistances to social justice through critical engagement of interdisciplinary readings that challenge engineering mindsets. Then the course helps students to understand what constitutes social justice in different areas of social life and the role that engineers and engineering might play in these. Finally, the course gives students an understanding of why and how engineering has been aligned and/or divergent from social justice issues and causes. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours. Prerequisite: LAIS100; pre- or co-requisite: LAIS200.

LAIS479. ENGINEERS ENGAGING COMMUNIITES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) (WI) Engineers and applied scientists face challenges that are profoundly socio-technical in nature, ranging from controversies surrounding new technologies of energy extraction that affect communities to the mercurial "social license to operate" in locations where technical systems impact people. Understanding the perspectives of communities and being able to establish positive working relationships with their members is therefore crucial to the socially responsible practice of engineering and applied science. This course provides students with the conceptual and methodological tools to engage communities in respectful and productive ways. Students will learn ethnographic field methods and participatory research strategies, and critically assess the strengths and limitations of these through a final original research project. Prerequisites: LAIS100. Co-requisites: LAIS200 and LAIS377. 3 semester hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS480. ANTHROPOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) (WI) Engineers and applied scientists face challenges that are profoundly socio-technical in nature, ranging from controversies surrounding new technologies of energy extraction that affect communities to the mercurial "social license to operate" in locations where technical systems impact people. Understanding the perspectives of communities and being able to establish positive working relationships with their members is therefore crucial to the socially responsible practice of engineering and applied science. This course provides students with the conceptual and methodological tools to engage communities in respectful and productive ways. Students will learn ethnographic field methods and participatory research strategies, and critically assess the strengths and limitations of these through a final original research project. Prerequisites: LAIS200. Co-requisites: LAIS377 or LAIS325. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS485. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND POLITICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

This course presents a comprehensive survey of the U.S. Constitution with special attention devoted to the first ten Amendments, also known as the Bill of Rights. Since the Constitution is primarily a legal document, the class will adopt a legal approach to constitutional interpretation. However, as the historical and political context of constitutional interpretation is inseparable from the legal analysis, these areas will also be covered. Significant current developments in constitutional jurisprudence will also be examined. The first part of the course deals with Articles I through III of the Constitution, which specify the division of national governmental power among the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government. Additionally, the federal nature of the American governmental system, in which governmental authority is apportioned between the national government and the state governments, will be studied. The second part of the course examines the individual rights specifically protected by the amendments to the Constitution, principally the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS486. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

An examination of current issues relating to science and technology policy in the United States and, as appropriate, in other countries. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS487. ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Seminar on environmental policies and the political and governmental processes that produce them. Group discussion and independent research on specific environmental issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS488. WATER POLITICS AND POLICY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Seminar on water policies and the political and governmental processes that produce them, as an exemplar of natural resource politics and policy in general. Group discussion and independent research on specific politics and policy issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S. Pre requisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requi site: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS489. NUCLEAR POWER AND PUBLIC POLICY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

A general introduction to research and practice concerning policies and practices relevant to the development and management of nuclear power. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LAIS490. ENERGY AND SOCIETY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ENGY490,MNGN490,
(I,II) An interdisciplinary capstone seminar that explores a spectrum of approaches to the understanding, planning, and implementation of energy production and use, including those typical of diverse private and public (national and international) corporations, organizations, states, and agencies. Aspects of global energy policy that may be considered include the historical, social, cultural, economic, ethical, political, and environmental aspects of energy together with comparative methodologies and assessments of diverse forms of energy development as these affect particular communities and societies. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: LAIS200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

LAIS498. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LAIS499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LICM198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 0.5-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LICM298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 0.5-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LIFL113. SPANISH I. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Fundamentals of spoken and written Spanish with an emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and Spanish American culture. 3 semester hours.

LIFL114. ARABIC I. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Fundamentals of spoken and written Arabic with an emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and culture of Arabic-speaking societies. 3 semester hours.

LIFL115. GERMAN I. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Fundamentals of spoken and written German with an emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and German culture. 3 semester hours.

LIFL119. FRENCH I. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) French I provides basic instruction in speaking, reading, listening, and writing the French language, with emphasis in class on communicating through speaking and listening skills. French and francophone culture will also be studied. Successful completion of French I will allow students to further their french studies in level 2. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

LIFL123. SPANISH II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Continuation of Spanish I with an emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well as further study of grammar, vocabulary, and Spanish American culture. 3 semester hours.

LIFL124. ARABIC II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Continuation of Arabic I with an emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well as further study of grammar, vocabulary, and culture of Arabic speaking societies. 3 semester hours.

LIFL125. GERMAN II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Continuation of German I with an emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well as further study of grammar, vocabulary, and German culture. 3 semester hours.

LIFL129. FRENCH II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) French 2 provides continued instruction in speaking, reading, listening, and writing the French language, with emphasis in class on communicating through speaking and listening skills. French and francophone culture will also be studied. Prerequisites: LIFL119. 3 hours lecture.

LIFL198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LIFL199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LIFL213. SPANISH III. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Emphasis on furthering conversational skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary, and Spanish American culture. 3 semester hours.

LIFL214. ARABIC III. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Emphasis on furthering conversational skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary, and culture of Arabic-speaking societies. 3 semester hours.

LIFL215. GERMAN III. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Emphasis on furthering conversational skills and a con tinuing study of grammar, vocabulary, and German culture. 3 semester hours.

LIFL298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LIFL299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LIFL398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LIFL399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LIFL498. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LIFL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LIMU101. BAND - FRESHMAN. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU102. BAND. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU111. CHORUS. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical, romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU112. CHORUS. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical, romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU189. INDIVIDUAL INSTRUMENTAL OR VOCAL MUSIC INSTRUCTION. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I, II) The course affords the student an opportunity to study privately with CSM music faculty on a wide range of instruments including guitar, piano, bass guitar, voice, saxophone, flute, drums and world instruments. Students will be required to practice regularly and demonstrate proficiency on their instrument/voice. Topics of this class will include performance etiquette, musicianship, musical styles, stylistic vocabulary, foreign language and basic music theory. 1 credit hour.

LIMU198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LIMU199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LIMU201. BAND - SOPHOMORE. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU202. BAND. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU211. CHORUS. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical, romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU212. CHORUS. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical, romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LIMU299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LIMU301. BAND - JUNIOR. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU302. BAND. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU311. CHORUS. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical, romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU312. CHORUS. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical, romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LIMU399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

LIMU401. BAND - SENIOR. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU402. JAZZ ENSEMBLE/PEP BAND. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU411. CHORUS. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical, romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU412. CHORUS. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical, romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU421. JAZZ ENSEMBLE/PEP BAND - FALL. 1.0 Semester Hr.

FALL The Jazz Ensemble provides an opportunity for students to participate in a musical ensemble in the jazz big band format. Jazz music is a unique American art form. The big band jazz format is an exciting way for students to experience the power, grace and beauty of this art form and music in general. The class will consist of regular weekly rehearsals and one or more concert performance (s). 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU422. JAZZ ENSEMBLE/PEP BAND - SPRING. 1.0 Semester Hr.

SPRING The Jazz Ensemble provides an opportunity for students to participate in a musical ensemble in the jazz big band format. Jazz music is a unique American art form. The big band jazz format is an exciting way for students to experience the power, grace and beauty of this art form and music in general. The class will consist of regular weekly rehearsals and one or more concert performance(s). 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU423. JAZZ LAB. 1.0 Semester Hr.

The Jazz Lab provides an opportunity for students to participate in a musical ensemble in the jazz combo format. Jazz music is a unique American art form. The jazz combo format is an exciting way for students to experience the joy and sense of achievement of performing this great American music form. The class will consist of regular weekly rehearsals and one or more concert performance(s). 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to a degree above.

LIMU450. MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE COURSE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Project-based course designed to develop practical technological and communication skills for direct application to the music recording. Prerequisite: LIMU340 and LIMU350. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

LIMU498. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

LIMU499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.