Mechanical Engineering

2017-2018

Program Description

The Mechanical Engineering Department offers a design-oriented undergraduate program that emphasizes fundamental engineering principles. Students receive a strong foundation in mechanical engineering disciplines, and a working knowledge of modern engineering tools. Classroom education is augmented with extensive practical laboratory experiences. Successful graduates are well-prepared for a mechanical engineering career in a world of rapid technological change.

The program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

During the freshman and sophomore years, students complete a set of core courses that include mathematics, basic sciences, and fundamental engineering disciplines. These years also include engineering design coursework within Engineering Practice Introductory Course (EPIC 151) and Introduction to Mechanical Engineering (MEGN 200). This experience teaches design methodology and stresses the creative aspects of the mechanical engineering profession. Additionally in the first two years, courses in humanities and social sciences allow students to explore the linkages between the environment, human society, and engineered systems.

In the junior and senior years, students complete an advanced engineering core that includes fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, numerical methods, control theory, machine design, computer-aided engineering, and manufacturing processes. This engineering core is complemented by courses in economics and electives in humanities and social sciences. Students must also take three advanced technical electives and three additional free electives to explore specific fields of interest. In the senior year, all students must complete a capstone design course focused on a multidisciplinary engineering project. 

Students in mechanical engineering spend considerable time in laboratories, including the CECS Garage with a variety of prototyping and testing equipment. Students are also encouraged to become involved in research that is being conducted within the Department of Mechanical Engineering. These research areas include: biomechanics; solid mechanics and materials; thermal-fluid systems; and robotics, automation, and design.

Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering)

The Mechanical Engineering program contributes to the educational objectives described in the Mines' Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation Criteria. Accordingly, the Mechanical Engineering Program at Mines has established the following program educational objectives for the B.S. in Mechanical Engineering degree:

Within three to five years of completing their degree, graduates will be:

  • Applying their Mechanical Engineering education as active contributors in the workforce or graduate school;

  • Effective at communicating technical information in a diverse and globally integrated society;

  • Demonstrating their commitment to continued professional development through training, coursework, and/or professional society involvement;

  • Exemplifying ethical and social responsibility in their professional activities.

Primary Contact

Kelly Knechtel
303-384-2394
knechtel@mines.edu

Professor and Department Head

Gregory S. Jackson

George R. Brown Distinguished Professor

Robert J. Kee

Professors

John R. Berger

Cristian V. Ciobanu

Graham G. W. Mustoe

Alexandra Newman

Brian Thomas

Associate professors

Joel M. Bach

Robert Braun

Mark Deinert

Anthony Petrella

John P. H. Steele

Neal Sullivan

Ruichong "Ray" Zhang

Assistant professors

Gregory Bogin

Ozkan Celik

Steven DeCaluwe

Andrew Petruska

Jason Porter

Anne Silverman

Aaron Stebner

Paulo Tabares-Velasco

Nils Tilton

Xiaoli Zhang

Teaching Associate Professors

Jenifer Blacklock

Kristine Csavina

Jered Dean

Ventzi Karaivanov

Leslie M. Light

Oyvind Nilsen

Derrick Rodriguez

Emeriti Professors

Robert King

Michael B. McGrath

Emerita Professor

Joan P. Gosink

Emeritus Associate Professor

David Munoz

Research Professor

George Gilmer

Research Associate Professor

Huayang Zhu

Research Assistant Professors

Christopher B. Dryer

Branden Kappes

Canan Karakaya

Andrew Osborne

Sandrine Ricote

Affiliate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Michael Mooney

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Degree Requirements:

Freshman
Fallleclabsem.hrs
LAIS100NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES  4.0
CHGN121PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I  4.0
CSM101FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR  0.5
CBEN110FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I or GEGN 101  4.0
MATH111CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I  4.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
17.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CHGN122PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1) or 125  4.0
PHGN100PHYSICS I - MECHANICS  4.5
MATH112CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II  4.0
EPIC151INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN  3.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
16.0
Sophomore
Fallleclabsem.hrs
LAIS200HUMAN SYSTEMS  3.0
PHGN200PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS  4.5
MATH213CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III  4.0
CEEN241STATICS  3.0
MEGN200INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICAL ENGINEERING  3.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
18.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
MTGN202ENGINEERED MATERIALS  3.0
MEGN361THERMODYNAMICS I  3.0
EENG281INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS, ELECTRONICS AND POWER  3.0
MATH225DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS  3.0
MEGN312INTRODUCTION TO SOLID MECHANICS  3.0
PAGN ElectivePHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE  0.5
15.5
Summerleclabsem.hrs
MEGN201MECHANICAL FIELD SESSION  3.0
3.0
Junior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
EBGN201PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS  3.0
EGGN250MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING LABORATORY  1.5
MEGN351FLUID MECHANICS  3.0
MATH307INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING  3.0
MEGN315DYNAMICS  3.0
MEGN424COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING  3.0
16.5
Springleclabsem.hrs
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective I  3.0
EGGN350MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING LABORATORY II  1.5
MEGN471HEAT TRANSFER  3.0
EENG307INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEMS  3.0
MEGN481MACHINE DESIGN  4.0
MEGN381MANUFACTURING PROCESSES  3.0
17.5
Senior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective II  3.0
FREE Free Elective  3.0
EGGN450MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING LABORATORY III  1.0
EGGN491SENIOR DESIGN I  3.0
MECH ELECT Mechanical Engineering Elective*  3.0
MECH ELECT Mechanical Engineering Elective*  3.0
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
FREE Free Elective  3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Restricted Elective III  3.0
MECH ELECT Mechanical Engineering Elective*  3.0
FREE Free Elective  3.0
EGGN492SENIOR DESIGN II  3.0
15.0
Total Semester Hrs: 134.5

* Mechanical Engineering students are required to take three Mechanical Engineering elective courses. At least one of these courses must be from the Advanced Engineering Sciences list. The remaining must be from either the Advanced Engineering Sciences list or the Mechanical Engineering Electives list.

Advanced Engineering Sciences:

MEGN412ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS3.0
MEGN416ENGINEERING VIBRATION3.0
MEGN451FLUID MECHANICS II3.0
MEGN461THERMODYNAMICS II3.0

Mechanical Engineering Electives:

CEEN405NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS3.0
CEEN406FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS3.0
EBGN321ENGINEERING ECONOMICS3.0
EENG389FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRIC MACHINERY4.0
EENG417MODERN CONTROL DESIGN3.0
EGGN401PROJECTS FOR PEOPLE3.0
MEGN330INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING3.0
MEGN430MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS3.0
MEGN435MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN MOVEMENT3.0
MEGN436COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS3.0
MEGN441INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS3.0
MEGN466INTRODUCTION TO INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES3.0
MEGN485MANUFACTURING OPTIMIZATION WITH NETWORK MODELS3.0
MEGN493ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION3.0
MEGN498SPECIAL TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (SPECIAL TOPICS)1-6
MEGN5XX ANY 500-LEVEL MEGN COURSE
MTGN311STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS3.0
MTGN450STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS3.0
MTGN445MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS3.0
MTGN463POLYMER ENGINEERING3.0
MTGN464FORGING AND FORMING2.0
MTGN475METALLURGY OF WELDING2.0
NUGN520INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR THERMAL-HYDRAULICS3.0
PHGN300PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I3.0
PHGN350INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS4.0
PHGN419PRINCIPLES OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS3.0

Major GPA

During the 2016-2017 Academic Year, the Undergraduate Council considered the policy concerning required major GPAs and which courses are included in each degree’s GPA.  While the GPA policy has not been officially updated, in order to provide transparency, council members agreed that publishing the courses included in each degree’s GPA is beneficial to students. 

The following list details the courses that are included in the GPA for this degree:

  • CEEN241
  • EENG281
  • EENG307
  • EGGN205
  • EGGN250
  • EGGN350
  • EGGN450
  • EGGN491
  • EGGN492
  • MEGN100 through MEGN699 inclusive

Combined Mechanical Engineering Baccalaureate and Masters Degrees

Mechanical Engineering offers a five year combined program in which students have the opportunity to obtain specific engineering skills supplemented with graduate coursework in mechanical engineering. Upon completion of the program, students receive two degrees, the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

Admission into a graduate degree program as a Combined Undergraduate/Graduate degree student may occur as early as the first semester Junior year and must be granted no later than the end of registration the last semester Senior year. Students must meet minimum GPA admission requirements for the graduate degree.

Students are required to take an additional thirty credit hours for the M.S. degree. Up to nine of the 30 credit hours beyond the undergraduate degree requirements can be 400-level courses. The remainder of the courses will be at the graduate level (500-level and above). The Mechanical Engineering Graduate Bulletin provides detail into the graduate program and includes specific instructions regarding required and elective courses. Students may switch from the combined program, which includes a non-thesis Master of Science degree to a M.S. degree with a thesis option; however, if students change degree programs they must satisfy all degree requirements for the M.S. with thesis degree.

General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.

Mechanical Engineering Areas of Special Interest (ASI)

and Minor Programs

General Requirements

The Mechanical Engineering Department offers minor and ASI programs. Students who elect an ASI or minor, must fulfill all prerequisite requirements for each course in a chosen sequence. Students in the sciences or mathematics must be prepared to meet prerequisite requirements in fundamental engineering and engineering science courses. Students in engineering disciplines are better positioned to meet the prerequisite requirements for courses in the minor and ASI Mechanical Engineering program. (See Minor/ASI section of the Bulletin for all requirements for a minor/ASI at CSM.)

For an Area of Special Interest in Mechanical Engineering, the student must complete a minimum of 12 hours from the following:

MEGN312INTRODUCTION TO SOLID MECHANICS3.0
MEGN315DYNAMICS3.0
MEGN351FLUID MECHANICS3.0
MEGN361THERMODYNAMICS I3.0

For a Minor in Mechanical Engineering, the student must complete a minimum of 18 hours from the following:

1. Required Courses (choose three, 9 credit hours)
MEGN312INTRODUCTION TO SOLID MECHANICS3.0
MEGN315DYNAMICS3.0
MEGN351FLUID MECHANICS3.0
MEGN361THERMODYNAMICS I3.0
2. Tracks (choose one track):
Robotics, Automation & Design Track (10 credit hours)
MEGN424COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING3.0
MEGN481MACHINE DESIGN4.0
MEGN381MANUFACTURING PROCESSES3.0
or MEGN441 INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS
or MEGN416 ENGINEERING VIBRATION
or MEGN485 MANUFACTURING OPTIMIZATION WITH NETWORK MODELS
Solid Materials Track (9 credit hours)
MEGN412ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS3.0
MEGN416ENGINEERING VIBRATION3.0
MEGN424COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING3.0
Thermal-Fluids Track (9 credit hours)
MEGN451FLUID MECHANICS II3.0
MEGN461THERMODYNAMICS II3.0
MEGN471HEAT TRANSFER3.0

Biomechanical Engineering Minor

General Requirements

To obtain a Biomechanical Engineering Minor, students must take at least 18.0 credits from the courses listed below. Fundamentals of Biology I (CBEN110), Fundamentals of Biology II (CBEN120), and Introduction to Biomechanical Engineering (MEGN330) are required (11.0 credits). Three more courses may be chosen from the proposed list of electives. The list of electives will be modified as new related courses become available.

Required Courses (11.0 credits)

CBEN110FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I4.0
CBEN120FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY II4.0
MEGN330INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING3.0

Biomechanical Engineering Elective Courses

MEGN430MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS3.0
MEGN435MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN MOVEMENT3.0
or MEGN535 MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN MOVEMENT
MEGN436COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS3.0
or MEGN536 COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS
MEGN530BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION3.0
MEGN531PROSTHETIC AND IMPLANT ENGINEERING3.0
MEGN532EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN BIOMECHANICS3.0
MEGN537PROBABILISTIC BIOMECHANICS3.0
MEGN553INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND TRANSPORT PHENOMENA3.0
MEGN x98, x99 SPECIAL TOPICS *3.0
MTGN472BIOMATERIALS I3.0
or MTGN572 BIOMATERIALS
MTGN570BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MATERIALS3.0
CBEN311INTRODUCTION TO NEUROSCIENCE3.0
CBEN306ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY: BONE, MUSCLE, AND BRAIN3.0
CBEN309ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY: BONE, MUSCLE, AND BRAIN LABORATORY1.0
CBEN320CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY3.0
CBEN454APPLIED BIOINFORMATICS3.0
or CBEN554 APPLIED BIOINFORMATICS
MATH331MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY3.0
PHGN433BIOPHYSICS3.0
*

 As the content of these courses varies, the course must be noted as relevant to the biomechanical engineering minor.

Courses

MEGN200. INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Students will learn the fundamentals behind mechanical engineering, design and drafting. The course will include an introduction to solid modeling using CAD and/or SolidWorks. Students will also gain understanding of how to visualize and present technical data. Understanding of the design process will be expanded from the previous course by understanding how drawing and prototyping are implemented through practice in a common team design project. Teamwork, presentations, and technical writing will be an integral part of this course. Prerequisites: EPIC151 or EPIC155. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN201. MECHANICAL FIELD SESSION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN235,
(S) This course provides the student with hands-on experience in the use of modern engineering tools as part of the design process including modeling, fabrication, and testing of components and systems. Student use engineering, mathematics and computers to conceptualize, model, create, test, and evaluate components and systems of their creation. Teamwork is emphasized by having students work in teams. Three weeks in summer field session. Prerequisites: MEGN200 (C- or better). 9 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

MEGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

MEGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: "Independent Study" form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

MEGN312. INTRODUCTION TO SOLID MECHANICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Introduction to the theory and application of the principles of Solid Mechanics by placing an early focus on free body diagrams, stress and strain transformations, and failure theories. Covered topics include: stress and stress transformation, strain and strain transformation, mechanical properties of materials, axial load, torsion, bending, transverse shear, combined loading, pressure vessels, failure theories, stress concentrations, thermal stress, deflection of beams and shafts, and column buckling. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply the principles of Solid Mechanics to the analysis of elastic structures under simple and combined loading, use free body diagrams in the analysis of structures, use failure theories to assess safety of design, and effectively communicate the outcomes of analysis and design problems. May not also receive credit for CEEN311. Prerequisites: CEEN241 (C- or better). Co-requisites: MEGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN315. DYNAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN315,
(I,II,S) Absolute and relative motions. Kinetics, work-energy, impulse-momentum, vibrations. Prerequisites: CEEN241 (C- or better) and MATH225 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN330. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with BELS325,BELS420,EGGN325,EGGN420,
(I) The application of mechanical engineering principles and techniques to the human body presents many unique challenges. The discipline of Biomedical Engineering (more specifically, Biomechanical Engineering) has evolved over the past 50 years to address these challenges. Biomechanical Engineering includes such areas as biomechanics, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation, medical imaging, and rehabilitation. This course is intended to provide an introduction to, and overview of, Biomechanical Engineering and to prepare the student for more advanced Biomechanical coursework. At the end of the semester, students should have a working knowledge of the special considerations necessary to apply various mechanical engineering principles to the human body. Prerequisites: MEGN312 or CEEN311 and PHGN200. Co-requisites: MEGN315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN340,EGGN340M,
(I,II,S) Supervised, full-time engineering related employment for a continuous six-month period in which specific educational objectives are achieved. Students must meet with the Department Head prior to enrolling to clarify the educational objectives for their individual Co-op program. Prerequisites: Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00. 3 semester hours credit will be granted once toward degree requirements. Credit earned in MEGN340, Cooperative Education, may be used as free elective credit hours if, in the judgment of the Department Head, the required term paper adequately documents the fact that the work experience entailed high-quality application of engineering principles and practice. Applying the credits as free electives requires the student to submit a Declaration of Intent to Request Approval to Apply Co-op Credit toward Graduation Requirements form obtained from the Career Center to the Department Head.

MEGN351. FLUID MECHANICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN351,
(I, II) Fluid properties, fluid statics, control-volume analysis, Bernoulli equation, differential analysis and Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis, internal flow, external flow, open-channel flow, and turbomachinery. May not also receive credit for CEEN310 or PEGN251. Prerequisite: CEEN241 (C- or better) or MNGN317 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN361. THERMODYNAMICS I. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN371,
(I, II, S) A comprehensive treatment of thermodynamics from a mechanical engineering point of view. Thermodynamic properties of substances inclusive of phase diagrams, equations of state, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, and ideal gases. Principles of conservation of mass and energy for steady-state and transient analyses. First and Second Law of thermodynamics, heat engines, and thermodynamic efficiencies. Application of fundamental principles with an emphasis on refrigeration and power cycles. May not also receive credit for CBEN210. Prerequisite: MATH213 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN381. MANUFACTURING PROCESSES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN390,MEGN380,
(I, II, S) Introduction to a wide variety of manufacturing processes with emphasis on process selection and laboratory measurements of process conditions with product variables. Consideration of relations among material properties, process settings, tooling features and product attributes. Design and implementation of a process for manufacture of a given component. Manual and Automated manufacturing and their implementation in plant layouts. Understanding how to eliminate waste in manufacturing processes and enhance scheduling and satisfying client needs. Quality, tolerances and standards will be discussed along with their importance in a manufacturing setting. Prerequisite: MEGN312 and MTGN202. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.

MEGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

MEGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: "Independent Study" form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

MEGN412. ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN422,
(I, II) General theories of stress and strain; stress and strain transformations, principal stresses and strains, octahedral shear stresses, Hooke's law for isotropic material, and failure criteria. Introduction to elasticity and to energy methods. Torsion of non-circular and thin-walled members. Unsymmetrical bending and shear-center, curved beams, and beams on elastic foundations. Introduction to plate theory. Thick-walled cylinders and contact stresses. Prerequisite: CEEN311 (C- or better) or MEGN312 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN416. ENGINEERING VIBRATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN478,
(II) Theory of mechanical vibrations as applied to single- and multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Analysis of free and forced vibrations to different types of loading - harmonic, impulse, periodic and general transient loading. Derive model systems using D'Alambert's principle, Lagrange's equations and Hamilton's principle. Analysis of natural frequencies and mode shapes. Role of damping in machines and structures. Analysis and effects of resonance. Use of the modal superposition method and the transient Duhamel integral method. Prerequisite: MEGN315 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN424. COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN413,
(I, II, S) This course introduces the student to the concept of computer-aided engineering. The major objective is to provide the student with the necessary background to use the computer as a tool for engineering analysis and design. The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) method and associated computational engineering software have become significant tools in engineering analysis and design. This course is directed to learning the concepts of FEA and its application to civil and mechanical engineering analysis and design. Note that critical evaluation of the results of a FEA using classical methods (from statics and mechanics of materials) and engineering judgment is employed throughout the course. Prerequisite: MEGN312 (C- or better) or CEEN311 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN425. ADVANCED COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I,S) This course studies advanced topics in engineering analysis using the finite element method. The analyses are conducted using commercial FEA software. The advanced topics include: nonlinear large deformations and elasto-plastic behavior, steady and transient heat transfer and thermally induced stresses, mechanical vibrations and transient dynamic phenomena, deformations and stresses in mechanical and structural assemblies, and stress intensity phenomena. Note, the accuracy and validity of FEA results is assessed by comparison with results obtained with exact or approximate analytical methods wherever possible. Prerequisites: MEGN424. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN430. MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with BELS425,EGGN425,
(II) This course is intended to provide mechanical engineering students with a second course in musculoskeletal biomechanics. At the end of the semester, students should have in-depth knowledge and understanding necessary to apply mechanical engineering principles such as statics, dynamics, and mechanics of materials to the human body. The course will focus on the biomechanics of injury since understanding injury will require developing an understanding of normal biomechanics. Prerequisite: MEGN315, CEEN311 or MEGN312, MEGN330. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN435. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN MOVEMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with BELS426,EGGN426,
(II) Introduction to modeling and simulation in biomechanics. The course includes a synthesis of musculoskeletal properties and interactions with the environment to construct detailed computer models and simulations. The course will culminate in individual class projects related to each student?s individual interests. Prerequisites: MEGN315 and MEGN330. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN436. COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with BELS428,BELS428,EGGN428,
Computational Biomechanics provides an introduction to the application of computer simulation to solve some fundamental problems in biomechanics and bioengineering. Musculoskeletal mechanics, medical image reconstruction, hard and soft tissue modeling, joint mechanics, and inter-subject variability will be considered. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the limitations of the computer model as a predictive tool and the need for rigorous verification and validation of computational techniques. Clinical application of biomechanical modeling tools is highlighted and impact on patient quality of life is demonstrated. Prerequisites: MEGN424, MEGN330. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. Fall odd years.

MEGN441. INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN400,
(I, II) Overview and introduction to the science and engineering of intelligent mobile robotics and robotic manipulators. Covers guidance and force sensing, perception of the environment around a mobile vehicle, reasoning about the environment to identify obstacles and guidance path features and adaptively controlling and monitoring the vehicle health. A lesser emphasis is placed on robot manipulator kinematics, dynamics, and force and tactile sensing. Surveys manipulator and intelligent mobile robotics research and development. Introduces principles and concepts of guidance, position, and force sensing; vision data processing; basic path and trajectory planning algorithms; and force and position control. EENG307 is recommended to be completed before this course. Prerequisites: CSCI261 and EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

MEGN451. FLUID MECHANICS II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN473,
(II) Review of elementary fluid mechanics and engineering, two-dimensional external flows, boundary layers, flow separation; Compressible flow, isentropic flow, normal and oblique shocks, Prandtl- Meyer expansion fans, Fanno and Rayleigh flow; Introduction to flow instabilities (e.g., Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, Raleigh Benard convection). Prerequisite: MEGN351 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN461. THERMODYNAMICS II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN403,
(I) This course extends the subject matter of Thermodynamics I (MEGN361) to include the study of exergy, ideal gas mixture properties, psychrometrics and humid air processes, chemical reactions, and the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Laws of Thermodynamics as applied to reacting systems. Chemical equilibrium of multi-component systems, and simultaneous chemical reactions of real combustion and reaction processes are studied. Phase equilibrium, ionization, and the thermodynamics of compressible flow (nozzles and shock) are also introduced. Concepts of the above are explored through the analysis of advanced thermodynamic systems, such as cascaded and absorption refrigeration systems, cryogenics, and advanced gas turbine and combined power cycles. Prerequisites: MEGN351 (C- or better), MEGN361 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN466. INTRODUCTION TO INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Introduction to Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs); with a specific focus on Compression Ignition (CI) and Spark Ignition (SI) reciprocating engines. This is an applied thermo science course designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of both 4-stroke and 2-stroke reciprocating engines ranging in size from model airplane engines to large cargo ship engines. Course is designed as a one ? semester course for students without prior experience with IC engines, however, the course will also include advanced engine technologies designed to deliver more horsepower, utilize less fuel, and meet stringent emission regulations. Discussion of advancements in alternative fueled engines will be covered as well. This course also includes an engine laboratory designed to provide hands-on experience and provide further insight into the material covered in the lectures. Prerequisites: MEGN351, MEGN361. Co-requisites: MEGN471. 3 hours lecture; 1.0 hour lab; 3 semester hours.

MEGN467. HVAC AND BUILDING ENERGY SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Senior year undergraduate and first year graduate course that covers the fundamentals of building energy systems, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and the use of numerical models for heat and mass transfer to analyze and/or design different building elements. Prerequisites: MEGN351, MEGN361, MEGN471. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN469. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CBEN469,CHEN469,EGGN469,MTGN469,
(I) Investigate fundamentals of fuel-cell operation and electrochemistry from a chemical-thermodynamics and materials- science perspective. Review types of fuel cells, fuel-processing requirements and approaches, and fuel-cell system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell science and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells in the Colorado Fuel Cell Center. Prerequisites: MEGN361 or CBEN357 or MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN471. HEAT TRANSFER. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN471,
(I, II) Engineering approach to conduction, convection, and radiation, including steadystate conduction, nonsteady-state conduction, internal heat generation conduction in one, two, and three dimensions, and combined conduction and convection. Free and forced convection including laminar and turbulent flow, internal and external flow. Radiation of black and grey surfaces, shape factors and electrical equivalence. Prerequisite: C- or better in MEGN351, C- or better in MEGN361, MATH307. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN481. MACHINE DESIGN. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN411,
(I, II) In this course, students develop their knowledge of machine components and materials for the purpose of effective and efficient mechanical design. Emphasis is placed on developing analytical methods and tools that aid the decision making process. The course focuses on determination of stress, strain, and deflection for static, static multiaxial, impact, dynamic, and dynamic multiaxial loading. Specific machine components covered include shafts, springs, gears, fasteners, and bearings. The course includes a semester-long project in which students work in teams during lab to solve an ill-defined engineering problem. The lab portion of the course hones students' professional communication via written deliverables intended for the general engineering client audience (Memorandum of Understanding and Statement of Intent) as well as written deliverables for the combined client, code enforcement body, and inspector audience (three professional engineering reports). The lab culminates in an oral sales pitch to the general engineering client for the purpose of securing engineering services contract. Prerequisites: C- or better in MEGN315 or PHGN350, and MEGN424. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

MEGN482. MECHANICAL DESIGN USING GD&T. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN410,
(II) The mechanical design process can be broadly grouped into three phases: requirements and concept, design and analysis, details and drawing package. In this class students will learn concepts and techniques for the details and drawing package phase of the design process. The details of a design are critical to the success of a design project. The details include selection and implementation of a variety of mechanical components such as fasteners (threaded, keys, retaining rings), bearing and bushings. Fits and tolerances will also be covered. Statistical tolerance analysis will be used to verify that an assembly will fit together and to optimize the design. Mechanical drawings have become sophisticated communication tools that are used throughout the processes of design, manufacturing, and inspection. Mechanical drawings are interpreted either by the ANSI or ISO standard which includes Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T). In this course the student will learn to create mechanical drawings that communicate all of the necessary information to manufacture the part, inspect the part, and allow the parts to be assembled successfully. Prerequisite: MEGN201. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

MEGN483. ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing in the popular press, is an emerging manufacturing technology that will see widespread adoption across a wide range of industries during your career. Subtractive Manufacturing (SM) technologies (CNCs, drill presses, lathes, etc.) have been an industry mainstay for over 100 years. The transition from SM to AM technologies, the blending of SM and AM technologies, and other developments in the manufacturing world has direct impact on how we design and manufacture products. This course will prepare students for the new design and manufacturing environment that AM is unlocking. Prerequisites: MEGN200 and MEGN201 or equivalent project classes. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN485. MANUFACTURING OPTIMIZATION WITH NETWORK MODELS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EBGN456,
(I) We examine network flow models that arise in manufacturing, energy, mining, transportation and logistics: minimum cost flow models in transportation, shortest path problems in assigning inspection effort on a manufacturing line, and maximum flow models to allocate machine-hours to jobs. We also discuss an algorithm or two applicable to each problem class. Computer use for modeling (in a language such as AMPL) and solving (with software such as CPLEX) these optimization problems is introduced. Prerequisites: MATH111. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN493. ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN493,
(II) The application of gradient, stochastic and heuristic optimization algorithms to linear and nonlinear optimization problems in constrained and unconstrained design spaces. Students will consider problems with continuous, integer and mixed-integer variables, problems with single or multiple objectives and the task modeling design spaces and constraints. Design optimization methods are becoming of increasing importance in engineering design and offer the potential to reduce design cycle times while improving design quality by leveraging simulation and historical design data. Prerequisites: MATH213 and MATH225 (Required), CSCI260 or CSCI261 or other experience with computer programming languages (Suggested). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

MEGN497. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 15.0 Semester Hrs.

MEGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

MEGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: "Independent Study" form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.