CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (CEEN)

CEEN198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CEEN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: Independent Study form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

CEEN210. INTRODUCTION TO CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE. 1.5 Semester Hr.

(I) An introduction to civil infrastructure systems, including the analysis, design and management of infrastructure that supports human activity, including transportation (road, rail, aviation), water and wastewater, communications and power. 0.75 hours lecture; 2.25 hours lab; 1.5 semester hours.

CEEN241. STATICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with DCGN241,
(I, II, S) Forces, moments, couples, equilibrium, centroids and second moments of areas, volumes and masses, hydrostatics, friction, virtual work. Applications of vector algebra to structures. Prerequisite: PHGN100 and credit or concurrent enrollment in MATH112. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN267. EPICS II: CIVIL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EPIC267,
(II): Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem solving in which students integrate teamwork and communication with the use of computer software as tools to solve engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize information acquisition and processing based on knowing what new information is necessary to solve a problem and where to find the information efficiently.Prerequisite: EDNS151, EDNS155, EDNS192, or HNRS115. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CEEN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: Independent Study form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

CEEN301. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN353,ESGN353,
(I, II) This course introduces fundamentals of environmental science & engineering as applied to water resource management and environmental problem solving. Topics include environmental regulation, toxicology, material balance, applications in environmental chemistry, hydrology, water quality management, water supply and treatment, and wastewater treatment and reuse. Topical discussions will address major sources and concerns in measurement, practice and underlying theory in the field of environmental engineering. The course also includes field trips to local water and wastewater treatment facilities to integrate theory with practice. Prerequisites: CHGN122, PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN302. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN354,ESGN354,
(I, II) Introductory level fundamentals in atmospheric systems, air pollution control, solid waste management, hazardous waste management, waste minimization, pollution prevention, role and responsibilities of public institutions and private organizations in environmental management(relative to air, solid and hazardous waste). Prerequisite: CHGN122, PHGN100 and MATH213. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN303. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN355,
(I) This course introduces the laboratory and experimental techniques used for generating and interpreting data in environmental science and engineering related to water, land, and environmental health. An emphasis is placed on quantitative chemical and microbiological analysis of water and soil samples relevant to water supply and wastewater discharge. Topics include basic water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, etc.) and quantitative analysis of chemicals by chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques. Advanced topics include quantitative and qualitative analysis of bioreactor performance, bench testing for water treatment, and measurement and control of disinfection by-products. Prerequisites: CEEN301 or CEEN302. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

CEEN310. FLUID MECHANICS FOR CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) The study and application of principles of incompressible fluid mechanics. Topics include: hydrostatic forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy, control volume analysis, conservation of mass, fluid motion, Bernoulli's equation and conservation of energy, momentum, dimensional analysis, internal flow (pipe systems), external flow (drag and lift), flow in open channels, and hydraulic jumps. The course will also introduce concepts about municipal water supply networks and storm water drainage and wastewater collection and treatment systems. May not also receive credit for PEGN251 or MEGN351. Prerequisites: PHGN100. Co-requisites: CEEN241. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.

CEEN311. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN320,
(I, II, S) Fundamentals of stresses and strains, material properties including axial, torsional, bending, and combined loadings. Stress at a point; stress transformations and Mohr's circle for stress; beam deflections, thin-wall pressure vessels, columns and buckling, and stress concentrations. May not also receive credit for MEGN312. Prerequisite: CEEN241. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN312. SOIL MECHANICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN361,
(I, II) An introductory course covering the engineering properties of soil, soil phase relationships and classification. Principle of effective stress. Seepage through soils and flow nets. Soil compressibility, consolidation and settlement prediction. Shear strength of soils. Prerequisite: CEEN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN312L. SOIL MECHANICS LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with EGGN363,
(I, II) Introduction to laboratory testing methods in soil mechanics. Classification, permeability, compressibility, shear strength. Co-requisites: CEEN312. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

CEEN314. STRUCTURAL THEORY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN342,
(I, II) Analysis of determinate and indeterminate structures for both forces and deflections. Influence lines, work and energy methods, moment distribution, matrix operations, computer methods. Prerequisite: CEEN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN330. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, ENVIRONMENTAL. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN335,
(S) The environmental module is intended to introduce students to laboratory and field analytical skills used in the analysis of an environmental engineering problem. Students will receive instruction on the measurement of water quality parameters (chemical, physical, and biological) in the laboratory and field. The student will use these skills to collect field data and analyze a given environmental engineering problem. Prerequisites: CEEN301. Three weeks in summer session; 9 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

CEEN331. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, CIVIL. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN234,
(S) The theory and practice of modern surveying. Lectures and hands-on field work teaches horizontal, vertical, and angular measurements and computations using traditional and modern equipment. Subdivision of land and applications to civil engineering practice, GPS and astronomic observations. Prerequisite: EDNS251, ENDS261, EDNS262 or CEEN267. Three weeks (6 day weeks) in summer field session; 9 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

CEEN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN340,EGGN340C,
(I,II,S) Supervised full-time engineering-related employment in which specific educational objectives are set and achieved. The co-op differs from a typical internship in both the length and scope of responsibilities. Students must meet with the CEE Co-op Advisor prior to enrolling to determine the appropriateness of the engagement, clarify the educational objectives, set expectations, and receive written approval for their specific Co-op program. This prior approval of the CEE Co-op Advisor and completion of paperwork with the Career Center is required prior to beginning the work portion of the program. The co-op occurs during academic fall or spring semester(s) and may overlap with a summer session, with a typical length of six months total. Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore status or above and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00. 3.0 credit hours. This course is repeatable.

CEEN350. CIVIL AND CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING MATERIALS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course deals with the nature and performance of civil engineering materials and evaluation of their physical and mechanical properties. This course focuses on materials used in construction and maintenance of building and infrastructure such as metals (steel and aluminum), aggregates, Portland cement, concrete, shotcrete, asphalt, wood, recycled materials, and composites. The course covers standards describing materials and tests for determining material properties and includes a lab component where students conduct tests, analyze the resulting data, and prepare technical reports. Laboratory tests include evaluation of behavior of civil engineering materials under a wide range of conditions. Prerequisites: CEEN311. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 3 semester hours.

CEEN360. INTRODUCTION TO CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Overview of the construction process for civil construction (spanning the building, transportation, and infrastructure sectors), including procurement methods and project delivery methods, codes, regulations, tests, standards, and Risk estimation and management. Construction methods and materials. Construction contracts, including drawings and specifications. Construction administration, including submittals, requests for information, change orders, special instructions, claims, disputes, arbitration, litigation, and project close-out. Project scheduling using the Critical Path Method. Construction project management. Construction safety and OSHA. Quantity takeoffs and construction estimating. Application of engineering analysis and design to construction projects. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN381. HYDROLOGY AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CEEN481,ESGN459,
(II) This course introduces the principles of physical hydrology and fundamentals of water resources engineering. Topics include groundwater, surface water, precipitation, infiltration, evapotranspiration, sediment transport, flood and drought analysis, lake and reservoir analysis, water-resources planning, water quality engineering, stormwater management, and engineering design problems. Prerequisites: CEEN310. 3 hour lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CEEN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: Independent Study form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

CEEN401. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Which is more sustainable: paper vs plastic, hybrid vs electric vehicles? LCA is a powerful tool used to answer these questions; LCA quantifies the environmental sustainability of a product or process. Students will learn to conduct an LCA during a semester-long project of their choosing. At the end of the course students should be able to sit for the ACLCA professional LCACP certification exam. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN405. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN460,
(S) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution of problems encountered in engineering analysis and design, e.g. linear simultaneous equations (e.g. analysis of elastic materials, steady heat flow); roots of nonlinear equations (e.g. vibration problems, open channel flow); eigenvalue problems (e.g. natural frequencies, buckling and elastic stability); curve fitting and differentiation (e.g. interpretation of experimental data, estimation of gradients); integration (e.g. summation of pressure distributions, finite element properties, local averaging ); ordinary differential equations (e.g. forced vibrations, beam bending). All course participants will receive source code consisting of a suite of numerical methods programs. Prerequisites: CSCI260 or CSCI261 or MATH307, MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN406. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN442,
(II) General theories of stress and strain; stress and strain transformations, principal stresses and strains, octahedral shear stresses, Hooke's law for isotropic material, and failure criteria. Introduction to elasticity and to energy methods. Torsion of noncircular and thin-walled members. Unsymmetrical bending and shear-center, curved beams, and beams on elastic foundations. Introduction to plate theory. Thick-walled cylinders and contact stresses. Prerequisites: CEEN311 or MEGN312; MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN410. ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN448,
Advanced soil mechanics theories and concepts as applied to analysis and design in geotechnical engineering. Topics covered will include seepage, consolidation, shear strength and probabilistic methods. The course will have an emphasis on numerical solution techniques to geotechnical problems by finite elements and finite differences. Prerequisite: CEEN312. 3 hour lectures; 3 semester hours. Fall even years.

CEEN411. SOIL DYNAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CEEN512,EGGN431,
(II) Soil Dynamics combines engineering vibrations with soil mechanics, analysis, and design. Students will learn to apply basic principles of dynamics towards the analysis and design of civil infrastructure systems when specific issues as raised by the inclusion of soil materials must be considered. Prerequisites: CEEN311, CEEN312, and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN412. UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CEEN511,
(II) Systematic introduction of soil mechanics under partially saturated conditions. Topics include principles of seepage under variably saturated conditions, principle of the effective stress, shear strength theory, and hydraulic and mechanical properties. When this course is cross-listed and concurrent with CEEN511, students that enroll in CEEN511 will complete additional and/or more complex assignments. Prerequisites: CEEN312. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.

CEEN415. FOUNDATION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN464,
(I, II) Techniques of subsoil investigation, types of foundations and foundation problems, selection of basis for design of foundation types. Open-ended problem solving and decision making. Prerequisite: CEEN312. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN421. HIGHWAY AND TRAFFIC ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN435,
The emphasis of this class is on the multi-disciplinary nature of highway and traffic engineering and its application to the planning and design of transportation facilities. In the course of the class the students will examine design problems that will involve: geometric design, surveying, traffic operations, hydrology, hydraulics, elements of bridge design, statistics, highway safety, transportation planning, engineering ethics, soil mechanics, pavement design, economics, environmental science. 3 credit hours. Taught on demand.

CEEN423. SURVEYING FOR ENGINEERS AND INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN PRACTICES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN333,EGGN433,
(I) Applications of civil engineering skills using the engineer's level, total station, GPS receiver, and commercial software for field data collection, design, and layout of civil infrastructure including survey control, roadways, intersections, and utilities such as water and sewer. The course includes basic road design, horizontal design, vertical design, centerline layout, slope/cross section staking, earthwork volume calculations, engineering astronomy, and preparation of plan/profile drawings. Some discussion of concepts and mathematics of applying GPS data to engineering projects and the principles of map projections (Mercator, Lambert, UTM, State Plane, etc.) and coordinate systems such as (North American Datum) NAD '27, NAD '83, and other reference networks is included. Prerequisite: CEEN331. 2 hours lecture; 8-9 field work days; 3 semester hours.

CEEN430. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN441,
(II) Introduction to advanced structural analysis concepts. Nonprismatic structures. Arches, Suspension and cable-stayed bridges. Structural optimization. Computer Methods. Structures with nonlinear materials. Internal force redistribution for statically indeterminate structures. Graduate credit requires additional homework and projects. Prerequisite: CEEN314. 3 hour lectures; 3 semester hours.

CEEN433. MATRIX STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CEEN533,
(II) Focused study on computer oriented methods for solving determinate and indeterminate structures such as trusses and frames. Classical stiffness based analysis method will be introduced with hands-on practice to develop customized matrix analysis program using Matlab. Commercial structural analysis programs will also be introduced during the class and practiced through class projects. When this course is cross-listed and concurrent with CEEN533, students that enroll in CEEN533 will complete additional and/or more complex assignments. Prerequisite: CEEN314. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.

CEEN440. TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN447,
(II) The course develops the theory and design methods required for the use of timber and masonry as structural materials. The design of walls, beams, columns, beam-columns, shear walls, and structural systems are covered for each material. Gravity, wind, snow, and seismic loads are calculated and utilized for design. Prerequisite: CEEN311 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture: 3 semester hours. Spring odd years.

CEEN441. INTRODUCTION TO THE SEISMIC DESIGN OF STRUCTURES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN494,
(I) This course provides students with an introduction to seismic design as it relates to structures. Students will become familiar with the sources of seismic disturbances, the physics of seismic energy transmission, and the relationship between ground disturbance and the resulting forces experienced by structures. The theory and basis for existing building code provisions relating to seismic design of structures will be introduced. Building code requirements and design methodologies will be examined and applied. Prerequisites: CEEN443, or CEEN445, or CEEN440. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN443. DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN444,
(I, II) To learn application and use the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Steel Construction Manual. Course develops an understanding of the underlying theory for the design specifications. Students learn basic steel structural member design principles to select the shape and size of a structural member. The design and analysis of tension members, compression members, flexural members, and members under combined loading is included, in addition to basic bolted and welded connection design. Prerequisite: CEEN314. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN445. DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN445,
(I, II) This course provides an introduction to the materials and principles involved in the design of reinforced concrete. It will allow students to develop an understanding of the fundamental behavior of reinforced concrete under compressive, tensile, bending, and shear loadings, and gain a working knowledge of strength design theory and its application to the design of reinforced concrete beams, columns, slabs, and footings. Prerequisite: CEEN314. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN461. FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN401,
(II). Biological and ecological principles discussed and industrial examples of their use given. Analysis of ecosystem processes, such as erosion, succession, and how these processes relate to engineering activities, including engineering design and plant operation. Criteria and performance standards analyzed for facility siting, pollution control, and mitigation of impacts. North American ecosystems analyzed. Concepts of forestry, range, and wildlife management integrated as they apply to all of the above. Three to four weekend trips will be arranged during the semester. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.

CEEN470. WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with BELS453,EGGN453,ESGN453,
(I) The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the unit operations and processes involved in water and wastewater treatment. This course will focus on the physical, chemical, and biological processes for water and wastewater treatment and reclamation. Treatment objectives, process theory, and practice are considered in detail. Prerequisite: CEEN301. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN471. WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the design of domestic and industrial water and wastewater treatment systems. This course will focus on the combination of physical, chemical, and biological processes and technologies to form a water or wastewater treatment system. Source water quality, treatment objectives, water reuse, multi-barrier approaches, and water and energy efficiency are considered in detail. Prerequisites: CEEN470, or CEEN570, or other water or wastewater treatment design courses (for graduate students enrolled in this course). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN472. ONSITE WATER RECLAMATION AND REUSE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN460,
(II). Appropriate solutions to water and sanitation in the U.S. and globally need to be effective in protecting public health and preserving water quality while also being acceptable, affordable and sustainable. Onsite and decentralized systems have the potential to achieve these goals in rural areas, peri-urban developments, and urban centers in small and large cities. Moreover they can improve water use efficiency, conserve energy and enable distributed energy generation, promote green spaces, restore surface waters and aquifers, and stimulate new green companies and jobs. A growing array of approaches, devices and technologies have evolved that include point-of-use water purification, waste source separation, conventional and advanced treatment units, localized natural treatment systems, and varied resource recovery and recycling options. This course will focus on the engineering selection, design, and implementation of onsite and decentralized systems for water reclamation and reuse. Topics to be covered include process analysis and system planning, water and waste stream attributes, water and resource conservation, confined unit and natural system treatment technologies, effluent collection and clustering, recycling and reuse options, and system management. Prerequisite: CEEN301. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN473. HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN451,
(I,II) Review of fundamentals, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy and flotation, gravity dams, weirs, steady flow in open channels, backwater curves, hydraulic machinery, elementary hydrodynamics, hydraulic structures. Prerequisites: CEEN310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN474. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION AND RECYCLING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN462,
(I) The course objective is to put the student into the shoes of a plant manager having process responsibility for waste minimization, focusing on recycling. Emphasis is on proven and emerging solutions, especially those associated with heavy metals. Waste minimization generally requires a solid understanding of alternative raw materials and process technologies, in combination with creativity and sensitivity to economics. Prerequisites: Senior standing 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN475. SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN457,ESGN457,
(I, II) This course describes the engineering principles and practices associated with the characterization and remediation of contaminated sites. Methods for site characterization and risk assessment will be highlighted while the emphasis will be on remedial action screening processes and technology principles and conceptual design. Common isolation and containment and in-situ and ex-situ treatment technology will be covered. Computerized decision-support tools will be used and case studies will be presented. Prerequisites: CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN476. POLLUTION PREVENTION: FUNDAMENTALS AND PRACTICE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN463,
(II) The objective of this course is to introduce the principles of pollution prevention, environmentally benign products and processes, and manufacturing systems. The course provides a thorough foundation in pollution prevention concepts and methods. Engineers and scientists are given the tools to incorporate environmental consequences into decision-making. Sources of pollution and its consequences are detailed. Focus includes sources and minimization of industrial pollution; methodology for life-cycle assessments and developing successful pollution prevention plans; technological means for minimizing the use of water, energy, and reagents in manufacturing; and tools for achieving a sustainable society. Materials selection, process and product design, and packaging are also addressed. Prerequisite: CEEN301 or CEEN302. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN477. SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN490,
(I) This course is a comprehensive introduction into concept of sustainability and sustainable development from an engineering point of view. It involves the integration of engineering and statistical analysis through a Life Cycle Assessment tool, allowing a quantitative, broad-based consideration any process or product design and their respective impacts on environment, human health and the resource base. The requirements for considering social implications are also discussed. Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing; 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

CEEN479. AIR POLLUTION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This course familiarizes students with the basic physics, chemistry and biology of major air pollutants, related health impacts, and engineered approaches used to mitigate the effects of common air pollutants. This course is also designed to provide a solid foundation in air pollution topic areas found on the FEE or PE exam. Critical US air pollution legislation is discussed. The sources of particulate and gaseous pollutants from both stationary and mobile sources, associated key chemical reactions, and approaches for control are considered. Indoor air pollution and the Gaussian dispersion model for air pollutants are discussed. Prerequisite: CEEN302. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN480. CHEMICAL FATE AND TRANSPORT IN THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN440,
(I) This course describes the environmental behavior of inorganic and organic chemicals in multimedia environments, including water, air, sediment and biota. Sources and characteristics of contaminants in the environment are discussed as broad categories, with some specific examples from various industries. Attention is focused on the persistence, reactivity, and partitioning behavior of contaminants in environmental media. Both steady and unsteady state multimedia environmental models are developed and applied to contaminated sites. The principles of contaminant transport in surface water, groundwater and air are also introduced. The course provides students with the conceptual basis and mathematical tools for predicting the behavior of contaminants in the environment. Prerequisite: CEEN301. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN482. HYDROLOGY AND WATER RESOURCES LABORATORY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course introduces students to the collection, compilation, synthesis and interpretation of data for quantification of the components of the hydrologic cycle, including precipitation, evaporation, infiltration, and runoff. Students will use hydrologic variables and parameters to evaluate watershed processes and behavior. Students will also survey and apply measurement techniques necessary for watershed studies. Advanced topics include development, construction, and application of analytical models for selected problems in hydrology and water resources. Prerequisite: CEEN381. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

CEEN492. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CEEN592,ESGN490,ESGN502,PEGN530,
(I) Specially designed for the needs of the environmental quality engineer, scientist, planner, manager, government regulator, consultant, or advocate. Highlights include how our legal system works, environmental law fundamentals, all major US EPA/state enforcement programs, the National Environmental Policy Act, air and water pollutant laws, risk assessment and management, and toxic and hazardous substance laws (RCRA, CERCLA, TSCA, LUST, etc). Prerequisites: CEEN301 or CEEN302. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CEEN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: Independent Study form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

CEEN501. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Which is more sustainable: paper vs plastic, hybrid vs electric vehicles? LCA is a powerful tool used to answer these questions; LCA quantifies the environmental sustainability of a product or process. Students will learn to conduct an LCA during a semester-long project of their choosing. At the end of the course students should be able to sit for the ACLCA professional LCACP certification exam. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN505. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN560,
(S) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution of commonly encountered problems of engineering analysis. Structural/solid analysis of elastic materials (linear simultaneous equations); vibrations (roots of nonlinear equations, initial value problems); natural frequency and beam buckling (eigenvalue problems); interpretation of experimental data (curve fitting and differentiation); summation of pressure distributions (integration); beam deflections (boundary value problems). All course participants will receive source code of all the numerical methods programs published in the course textbook which is coauthored by the instructor. Prerequisite: MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN506. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN542,
(II) A course combining finite element theory with practical programming experience in which the multidisciplinary nature of the finite element method as a numerical technique for solving differential equations is emphasized. Topics covered include simple ?structural? elements, beams on elastic foundations, solid elasticity, steady state analysis and transient analysis. Some of the applications will lie in the general area of geomechanics, reflecting the research interests of the instructor. Students get a copy of all the source code published in the course textbook. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN510. ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN548,
Advanced soil mechanics theories and concepts as applied to analysis and design in geotechnical engineering. Topics covered will include seepage, consolidation, shear strength, failure criteria and constitutive models for soil. The course will have an emphasis on numerical solution techniques to geotechnical problems by finite elements and finite differences. Prerequisites: A first course in soil mechanics. 3 Lecture Hours, 3 semester hours. Fall even years.

CEEN511. UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGES533,EGGN533,
The focus of this course is on soil mechanics for unsaturated soils. It provides an introduction to thermodynamic potentials in partially saturated soils, chemical potentials of adsorbed water in partially saturated soils, phase properties and relations, stress state variables, measurements of soil water suction, unsaturated flow laws, measurement of unsaturated permeability, volume change theory, effective stress principle, and measurement of volume changes in partially saturated soils. The course is designed for seniors and graduate students in various branches of engineering and geology that are concerned with unsaturated soil?s hydrologic and mechanics behavior. When this course is cross-listed and concurrent with CEEN412, students that enroll in CEEN511 will complete additional and/or more complex assignments. Prerequisites: CEEN312. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring even years.

CEEN512. SOIL BEHAVIOR. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGES534,EGGN534,
(I) The focus of this course is on interrelationships among the composition, fabric, and geotechnical and hydrologic properties of soils that consist partly or wholly of clay. The course will be divided into two parts. The first part provides an introduction to the composition and fabric of natural soils, their surface and pore-fluid chemistry, and the physico-chemical factors that govern soil behavior. The second part examines what is known about how these fundamental characteristics and factors affect geotechnical properties, including the hydrologic properties that govern the conduction of pore fluid and pore fluid constituents, and the geomechanical properties that govern volume change, shear deformation, and shear strength. The course is designed for graduate students in various branches of engineering and geology that are concerned with the engineering and hydrologic behavior of earth systems, including geotechnical engineering, geological engineering, environmental engineering, mining engineering, and petroleum engineering. When this course is cross-listed and concurrent with CEEN411, students that enroll in CEEN512 will complete additional and/or more complex assignments. Prerequisites: CEEN361 Soil Mechanics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN513. ADVANCED GEOMATERIAL MECHANICS. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course deals with the classification and engineering behavior of soil and rock materials as well as materials used in underground construction such as structural steel, aggregates, cement, timber, concrete, shotcrete, accelerators and ground conditioning agents. This course presents an advanced treatment of soil and rock mechanics with focus on the following topics: Index and classification properties of soils, Physical properties and classification of intact rock and rock masses, Fluid flow in soils and rocks, Compressibility of soils and rocks, Failure theories and strength testing of soils and rocks, Shear strength of soils and rocks, Stresses and deformations around underground openings, Laboratory and field methods for evaluation of soil and rock properties, and Analytical and empirical approaches for the design and construction of structures in soil and rock materials. Prerequisites: Undergraduate degree in a pertinent discipline of engineering or equivalent and undergraduate level knowledge of material behavior. Co-requisites: GEGN561. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.

CEEN514. SOIL DYNAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN531,
(II) Dynamic phenomena in geotechnical engineering, e.g., earthquakes, pile and foundation vibrations, traffic, construction vibrations; behavior of soils under dynamic loading, e.g., small, medium and large strain behavior, soil liquefaction; wave propagation through soil and rock; laboratory and field techniques to assess dynamic soil properties; analysis and design of shallow and deep foundations subjected to dynamic loading; analysis of construction vibrations. Prerequisites: CEEN312, MEGN315, CEEN415. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN515. HILLSLOPE HYDROLOGY AND STABILITY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN536,
(I) Introduction of shallow landslide occurrence and socio-economic dynamics. Roles of unsaturated flow and stress in shallow landslides. Slope stability analysis based on unsaturated effective stress conceptualization. Computer modeling of unsaturated flow and stress distributions in hillslope. Prediction of precipitation induced shallow landslides. Prerequisite: CEEN312. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN520. EARTH RETAINING STRUCTURES / SUPPORT OF EXCAVATIONS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Analysis, design, construction and monitoring of earth retaining structures and support of excavations used for permanent and temporary support of transportation facilities, bridges, underground structures and tunnels, shafts, waterfront structures, earth slopes and embankments. Includes gravity, semi-gravity, cantilevered, anchored, geosynthetic and ground improvement walls. Addresses fundamental geomechanics required for analysis and design, ASD (allowable stress design) and LRFD (load resistance factor design) design techniques, and construction techniques. Prerequisites: Undergraduate Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering course (i.e., similar to CEEN312). 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.

CEEN523. UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING IN SOFT GROUND. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) Design and construction of water, wastewater, transportation and utility tunnels, underground space and shafts/excavations in soft ground conditions (soil and weak rock). Addresses geotechnical site characterization, selection of design parameters, stability and deformation analysis of the ground and overlying structures, and construction methods. Includes design of temporary and permanent structural ground support according to ASD (allowable stress design) and LRFD (load resistance factor design) approaches, and design of ground improvement schemes and instrumentation/monitoring approaches to mitigate risk. This course requires post-graduate level knowledge of soil mechanics, fundamental understanding of engineering geology, and an undergraduate level knowledge of structural analysis and design. Prerequisites: CEEN513 and GEGN468. Co-requisites: GEGN562. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.

CEEN530. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN541,
(I) Introduction to advanced structural analysis concepts. Nonprismatic structures. Arches, Suspension and cable-stayed bridges. Structural optimization. Computer Methods. Structures with nonlinear materials. Internal force redistribution for statically indeterminate structures. Graduate credit requires additional homework and projects. Prerequisite: CEEN314. 3 hour lectures, 3 semester hours.

CEEN531. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN557,
An introduction to the dynamics and earthquake engineering of structures is provided. Subjects include the analysis of linear and nonlinear single-degree and multi-degree of freedom structural dynamics. The link between structural dynamics and code-based analysis and designs of structures under earthquake loads is presented. he focus applicaitons of the course include single story and multi-story buildings, and other types of sructures that under major earthquake may respond in the inelastic range. Prerequisites: CEEN314 Structural Theory. 3 semester hours.

CEEN533. MATRIX STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CEEN433,
(II) Focused study on computer oriented methods for solving determinate and indeterminate structures such as trusses and frames. Classical stiffness based analysis method will be introduced with hands-on practice to develop customized matrix analysis program using Matlab. Commercial structural analysis programs will also be introduced during the class and practiced through class projects. When this course is cross-listed and concurrent with CEEN433, students that enroll in CEEN533 will complete additional and/or more complex assignments. Prerequisites: CEEN314 Elementary Structural Theory. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.

CEEN540. ADVANCED DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN549,
The course extends the coverage of steel design to include the topics: slender columns, beam-columns, frame behavior, bracing systems and connections, stability, moment resisting connections, composite design, bolted and welded connections under eccentric loads and tension, and semi-rigid connections. Prerequisite: CEEN443 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring even years.

CEEN541. DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN556,
Advanced problems in the analysis and design of concrete structures, design of slender columns; biaxial bending; two-way slabs; strut and tie models; lateral and vertical load analysis of multistory buildings; introduction to design for seismic forces; use of structural computer programs. Prerequisite: CEEN445. 3 hour lectures, 3 semester hours. Delivered in the spring of even numbered years.

CEEN542. TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN547,
The course develops the theory and design methods required for the use of timber and masonry as structural materials. The design of walls, beams, columns, beam-columns, shear walls, and structural systems are covered for each material. Gravity, wind, snow, and seismic loads are calculated and utilized for design. Connection design and advanced seismic analysis principles are introduced. Prerequisite: CEEN314 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring odd years.

CEEN543. CONCRETE BRIDGE DESIGN BASED ON THE AASHTO LRFD SPECIFICATIONS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN558,
This course presents the fundamentals of concrete bridge analysis and design including conceptual design, superstructure analysis, AASHTO-LRFD bridge specifications, flat slab bridge design, and pre-stressed concrete bridge design. The course is presented through the complete design of the superstructure of an example bridges. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to analyze and design simple, but complete concrete bridge superstructures. Prerequisites: CEEN445, Design of Reinforced Concrete Structure. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN544. STRUCTURAL PRESERVATION OF EXISTING AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) A broad discussion of historic structural systems in the United States, including stone and brick masonry, terra cotta, timber, cast and wrought iron, early steel, and early concrete. Combines research of historic manuals with contemporary analysis. Introduces nondestructive tests for historic structures. Enables prediction of deterioration mechanisms and structural deficiencies. Synthesizes structural retrofit solutions with preservation philosophy and current building codes. Emphasizes the engineer?s role in stewardship of historic buildings. Prerequisites: CEEN443 and CEEN445. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.

CEEN545. STEEL BRIDGE DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Students are introduced to, and will develop an understanding of, the theory, analysis, and AASHTO code requirements for the design of steel bridge superstructures. The students will become familiar with bridge types, required loadings, composite action, plate girder design, and the Load and Resistance Factor Design method. The students will recognize the design requirements for a steel bridge superstructure and perform calculations for member loads and the loadings it transfers to the substructure. Prerequisites: CEEN443. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN546. STATISTICAL METHODS FOR RELIABILITY AND ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) The course will introduce methods and principles that help quantifying the effects of uncertainty in the performance prediction of civil infrastructure systems. Students will learn to apply quantitative risk analysis and modeling approaches relevant to design problems in civil engineering. The course emphasizes that the systematic treatment of uncertainty and risk quantification are essential for adequate engineering planning, design, and operation of systems. The statistical approaches fundamental to engineering design and theory of reliability in structural and underground infrastructure design will be the focus of the course and examples. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN550. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN500,
This course provides an introduction to chemical equilibria in natural waters and engineered systems. Topics covered include chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, acid/base chemistry, open and closed carbonate systems, precipitation reactions, coordination chemistry, adsorption and redox reactions. Prerequisites: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN551. ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN555,
A study of the chemical and physical interactions which determine the fate, transport and interactions of organic chemicals in aquatic systems, with emphasis on chemical transformations of anthropogenic organic contaminants. Prerequisites: A course in organic chemistry and CHGN503, Advanced Physical Chemistry or its equivalent. Offered in alternate years. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN552. CHEMISTRY OF THE SOIL / WATER INTERFACE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN525,
The fate of many elements in the soil/water environment is regulated by sorption reactions. The content of this course focuses on the physical chemistry of reactions occurring at the soil-particle/water interface. The emphasis is on the use of surface complexation models to interpret solute sorption at the particle/water interface. Prerequisites: CEEN550. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN553. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOCHEMISTRY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN510,
This course covers the phenomena of radioactivity (e.g., modes of decay, methods of detection and biological effects) and the use of naturally occurring and artificial radionuclides as tracers for environmental processes. Discussions of tracer applications will range from oceanic trace element scavenging to contaminant transport through groundwater aquifers. Prerequisites: CEEN 550. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN555. LIMNOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN513,
This course covers the natural chemistry, physics, and biology of lakes as well as some basic principles concerning contamination of such water bodies. Topics include heat budgets, water circulation and dispersal, sedimentation processes, organic compounds and their transformations, radionuclide limnochronology, redox reactions, metals and other major ions, the carbon dioxide system, oxygen, nutrients; planktonic, benthic and other communities, light in water and lake modeling. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN556. MINING AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN556,
The course will cover many of the environmental problems and solutions associated with each aspect of mining and ore dressing processes. Mining is a complicated process that differs according to the type of mineral sought. The mining process can be divided into four categories: Site Development; Extraction; Processing; Site Closure. Procedures for hard rock metals mining; coal mining; underground and surface mining; and in situ mining will be covered in relation to environmental impacts. Beneficiation, or purification of metals will be discussed, with cyanide and gold topics emphasized. Site closure will be focused on; stabilization of slopes; process area cleanup; and protection of surface and ground water. After discussions of the mining and beneficiation processes themselves, we will look at conventional and innovative measures to mitigate or reduce environmental impact.

CEEN558. ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP OF NUCLEAR RESOURCES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN511,
The stewardship of nuclear resources spans the entire nuclear fuel cycle, which includes mining and milling through chemical processing on the front end of the materials life cycle. On the back end, stewardship continues from materials removal from the power plant during re-fueling or facility decommissioning, through storage, recycling and disposal, as well as the management of activated or contaminated materials generated during facility decommissioning. Each stage in the fuel cycle has a different risk of public exposure through different pathways and the presence of different isotopes. These risks are an integral part in considering the long-term efficacy of nuclear as an energy alternative. Furthermore, nuclear energy has long been vilified in public opinion forums via emotional responses. Stewardship extends beyond quantification of risks to the incorporation and communication of these risks and the associated facts regarding nuclear power to the public at large. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN560. MOLECULAR MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN586,
This course explores the diversity of microbiota in a few of the countless environments of our planet. Topics include microbial ecology (from a molecular perspective), microbial metabolism, pathogens, extreme environments, engineered systems, oxidation / reduction of metals, bioremediation of both organics and inorganics, microbial diversity, phylogenetics, analytical tools and bioinformatics. The course has an integrated laboratory component for applied molecular microbial ecology to learn microscopy, DNA extraction, PCR, gel electrophoresis, cloning, sequencing, data analysis and bioinformatic applications. Prerequisite: College Biology and/or CHGC562, CHGC563 or equivalent and enrollment in the ESE graduate program. 3 hours lecture, some field trips; 3 semester hours.

CEEN562. ENVIRONMENTAL GEOMICROBIOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with BELS596,ESGN596,
(II) This course explores the functional activities and biological significance of microorganisms in geological and engineered systems with a focus on implications to water resources. Topics include: microorganisms as geochemical agents of change, mechanisms and thermodynamics of microbial respiration, applications of analytical, material science and molecular biology tools to the field, and the impact of microbes on the fate and transport of problematic water pollutants. Emphasis will be placed on critical analysis and communication of peer-reviewed literature on these topics. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.

CEEN564. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with BELS545,ESGN545,
This course provides an introduction to general concepts of ecology, biochemistry, and toxicology. The introductory material will provide a foundation for understanding why, and to what extent, a variety of products and by-products of advanced industrialized societies are toxic. Classes of substances to be examined include metals, coal, petroleum products, organic compounds, pesticides, radioactive materials, and others. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN565. AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with BELS544,ESGN544,
This course provides an introduction to assessment of the effects of toxic substances on aquatic organisms, communities, and ecosystems. Topics include general toxicological principles, water quality standards, sediment quality guidelines, quantitative structure-activity relationships, single species and community-level toxicity measures, regulatory issues, and career opportunities. The course includes hands-on experience with toxicity testing and subsequent data reduction. Prerequisite: none. 2.5 hours lecture; 1 hour laboratory; 3 semester hours.

CEEN566. MICROBIAL PROCESSES, ANALYSIS AND MODELING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with BELS541,ESGN541,
Microorganisms facilitate the transformation of many organic and inorganic constituents. Tools for the quantitative analysis of microbial processes in natural and engineered systems will be presented. Stoichiometries, energetics, mass balances and kinetic descriptions of relevant microbial processes allow the development of models for specific microbial systems. Simple analytical models and complex models that require computational solutions will be presented. Systems analyzed include suspended growth and attached growth reactors for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment as well as in-stu bioremediation and bioenergy systems. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN570. WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN504,
Unit operations and processes in environmental engineering are discussed in this course, including physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. Treatment objectives, process theory, and practice are considered in detail. Prerequisites: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN571. ADVANCED WATER TREATMENT ENGINEERING AND WATER REUSE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN506,
This course presents issues relating to theory, design, and operation of advanced water and wastewater treatment unit processes and water reuse systems. Topics include granular activated carbon (GAC), advanced oxidation processes (O3/H2O2), UV disinfection, pressure-driven, current-driven, and osmotic-driven membranes (MF, UF, NF, RO, electrodialysis, and forward osmosis), and natural systems such as riverbank filtration (RBF) and soil-aquifer treatment (SAT). The course is augmented by CEEN571L offering hands-on experience using bench- and pilot-scale unit operations. Prerequisite: CEEN470 or CEEN471 or CEEN570 or CEEN572. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN571L. ADVANCED WATER TREATMENT ENGINEERING AND WATER REUSE - LABORATORY. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with ESGN506L,
This course provides hands-on experience using bench- and pilotscale unit operations and computer exercises using state-ofthe- art software packages to design advanced water treatment unit processes. Topics include adsorption processes onto powdered and granular activated carbon, low-pressure membrane processes (microfiltration, ultrafiltration), and highpressure and current-driven membrane processes (nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, and electrodialysis). The course is a highly recommended component of CEEN571 and meets 5 - 6 times during the semester to support the work in CEEN571. Co- or Pre-requisite: CEEN571. 1 semester hour.

CEEN572. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING PILOT PLANT LABORATORY. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN530,
This course provides an introduction to bench and pilot-scale experimental methods used in environmental engineering. Unit operations associated with water and wastewater treatment for real-world treatment problems are emphasized, including multi-media filtration, oxidation processes, membrane treatment, and disinfection processes. Investigations typically include: process assessment, design and completion of bench- and pilot-scale experiments, establishment of analytical methods for process control, data assessment, upscaling and cost estimation, and project report writing. Projects are conducted both at CSM and at the City of Golden Water Treatment Pilot Plant Laboratory. Prerequisites: CEEN550 and CEEN570. 6 hours laboratory; 4 semester hours.

CEEN573. RECLAMATION OF DISTURBED LANDS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN552,
Basic principles and practices in reclaiming disturbed lands are considered in this course, which includes an overview of present legal requirements for reclamation and basic elements of the reclamation planning process. Reclamation methods, including recontouring, erosion control, soil preparation, plant establishment, seed mixtures, nursery stock, and wildlife habitat rehabilitation, will be examined. Practitioners in the field will discuss their experiences. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN574. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION AND RECYCLING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN562,
This course will examine, using case studies, ways in which industry applies engineering principles to minimize waste formation and to meet solid waste recycling challenges. Both proven and emerging solutions to solid waste environmental problems, especially those associated with metals, will be discussed. Prerequisite: CEEN550. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN575. HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE REMEDIATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN575,
This course covers remediation technologies for hazardous waste contaminated sites, including site characteristics and conceptual model development, remedial action screening processes, and technology principles and conceptual design. Institutional control, source isolation and containment, subsurface manipulation, and in situ and ex situ treatment processes will be covered, including unit operations, coupled processes, and complete systems. Case studies will be used and computerized tools for process selection and design will be employed. Prerequisite: CEEN550 and CEEN580. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN575L. HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE REMEDIATION: TREATABILITY TESTING. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with ESGN575L,
This laboratory module is designed to provide hands-on experience with treatability testing to aid selection and design of remediation technologies for a contaminated site. The course will be comprised of laboratory exercises in Coolbaugh Hall and possibly some field site work near CSM. Pre-requisite: CEEN575. 2 hours laboratory; 1 semester hour.

CEEN576. POLLUTION PREVENTION: FUNDAMENTALS AND PRACTICE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN563,
The objective of this course is to introduce the principles of pollution prevention, environmentally benign products and processes, and manufacturing systems. The course provides a thorough foundation in pollution prevention concepts and methods. Engineers and scientists are given the tools to incorporate environmental consequences into decision-making. Sources of pollution and its consequences are detailed. Focus includes sources and minimization of industrial pollution; methodology for life-cycle assessments and developing successful pollution prevention plans; technological means for minimizing the use of water, energy, and reagents in manufacturing; and tools for achieving a sustainable society. Materials selection, process and product design, and packaging are also addressed. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN580. CHEMICAL FATE AND TRANSPORT IN THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN503,
This course describes the environmental behavior of inorganic and organic chemicals in multimedia environments, including water, air, sediment and biota. Sources and characteristics of contaminants in the environment are discussed as broad categories, with some specific examples from various industries. Attention is focused on the persistence, reactivity, and partitioning behavior of contaminants in environmental media. Both steady and unsteady state multimedia environmental models are developed and applied to contaminated sites. The principles of contaminant transport in surface water, groundwater, and air are also introduced. The course provides students with the conceptual basis and mathematical tools for predicting the behavior of contaminants in the environment. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN581. WATERSHED SYSTEMS MODELING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN527,
Introduction to surface water modeling, including rainfall-runoff analysis, input data, uncertainty analysis, lumped and distributed modeling, parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis. Course is heavy on application of models across a range of diverse watersheds for streamflow and snowmelt predictions. In general, theoretical topics are covered in the first meeting each week, followed by hands-on application of concepts and models in the second meeting. Laptops and student Matlab licenses will be required for in-class activities. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture per week; 3 semester hours.

CEEN582. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN528,
This is an advanced graduate-level course designed to provide students with hands-on experience in developing, implementing, testing, and using mathematical models of environmental systems. The course will examine why models are needed and how they are developed, tested, and used as decision-making or policy-making tools. Typical problems associated with environmental systems, such as spatial and temporal scale effects, dimensionality, variability, uncertainty, and data insufficiency, will be addressed. The development and application of mathematical models will be illustrated using a theme topic such as Global Climate Change, In Situ Bioremediation, or Hydrologic Systems Analysis. Prerequisites: CEEN580 and knowledge of basic statistics and computer programming. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN583. SURFACE WATER QUALITY MODELING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN520,
This course will cover modeling of water flow and quality in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. Topics will include introduction to common analytical and numerical methods used in modeling surface water flow, water quality, modeling of kinetics, discharge of waste water into surface systems, sedimentation, growth kinetics, dispersion, and biological changes in lakes and rivers. Prerequisites: CEEN480 or CEEN580 recommended. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN584. SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN522,
This course will investigate physical, chemical, and biological processes governing the transport and fate of contaminants in the saturated and unsaturated zones of the subsurface. Basic concepts in fluid flow, groundwater hydraulics, and transport will be introduced and studied. The theory and development of models to describe these phenomena, based on analytical and simple numerical methods, will also be discussed. Applications will include prediction of extents of contaminant migration and assessment and design of remediation schemes. Prerequisites: CEEN580. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN589. WATER SUSTAINABILITY AND ENERGY PRODUCTION: CURRENT SCIENCE AND PRACTICE. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(II) This course is designed to provide students with valuable communication and professional skills while exploring in depth the topic of joint sustainability of water and unconventional petroleum energy production. A survey of current literature combined with key speakers will introduce the students to the field, while class sessions and practical exercises will help develop important communication, research, and interpersonal skills needed for future professionals. Course curriculum includes specific topics such as speaking/writing for a variety of audiences and critical thinking and analysis. This course is required for all ConocoPhillips - WE2ST Fellows, but is also open to any interested graduate students. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.

CEEN590. CIVIL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I) Introduction to contemporary and advanced methods used in engineering design. Includes, need and problem identification, methods to understand the customer, the market and the competition. Techniques to decompose design problems to identify functions. Ideation methods to produce form from function. Design for X topics. Methods for prototyping, modeling, testing and evaluation of designs. Embodiment and detailed design processes. Prerequisites: EGGN491 and EGGN492, equivalent senior design project experience or industrial design experience, graduate standing. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Taught on demand.

CEEN591. ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN571,
This course investigates environmental project management and decision making from government, industry, and contractor perspectives. Emphasis is on (1) economics of project evaluation; (2) cost estimation methods; (3) project planning and performance monitoring; (4) and creation of project teams and organizational/communications structures. Extensive use of case studies. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN592. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CEEN492,ESGN490,ESGN502,PEGN530,
This is a comprehensive introduction to U.S. Environmental Law, Policy, and Practice, especially designed for the professional engineer, scientist, planner, manager, consultant, government regulator, and citizen. It will prepare the student to deal with the complex system of laws, regulations, court rulings, policies, and programs governing the environment in the USA. Course coverage includes how our legal system works, sources of environmental law, the major USEPA enforcement programs, state/local matching programs, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), air and water pollution (CAA, CWA), EPA risk assessment training, toxic/hazardous substances laws (RCRA, CERCLA, EPCRA, TSCA, LUST, etc.), and a brief introduction to international environmental law. Prerequisites: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN593. ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING AND REGULATORY COMPLIANCE. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN593,
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the permit writing process, developing information requirements for permit applications, working with ambiguous regulations, negotiating with permit writers, and dealing with public comment. In addition, students will develop an understanding of the process of developing an economic and legally defensible regulatory compliance program. Prerequisite: CEEN592. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN594. RISK ASSESSMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN501,
This course evaluates the basic principles, methods, uses, and limitations of risk assessment in public and private sector decision making. Emphasis is on how risk assessments are made and how they are used in policy formation, including discussion of how risk assessments can be objectively and effectively communicated to decision makers and the public. Prerequisite: CEEN592 and one semester of statistics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN595. ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN591,
Techniques for assessing the impact of mining and other activities on various components of the ecosystem. Training in the procedures of preparing Environmental Impact Statements. Course will include a review of pertinent laws and acts (i.e. Endangered Species Act, Coordination Act, Clean Air Act, etc.) that deal with environmental impacts. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture, some field trips; 3 semester hours.

CEEN596. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING SEMINAR. 0.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN590,
Research presentations covering current research in a variety of environmental topics.

CEEN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once, but no more than twice for the same course content. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit: 0 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CEEN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit: 0.5 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different topics/experience and maximums vary by department. Contact the Department for credit limits toward the degree.

CEEN610. INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN602,
The course covers an introductory survey of International Environmental Law, including multi-nation treaties, regulations, policies, practices, and politics governing the global environment. It surveys the key issues of sustainable development, natural resources projects, transboundary pollution, international trade, hazardous waste, climate change, and protection of ecosystems, wildlife, and human life. New international laws are changing the rules for engineers, project managers, scientists, teachers, businesspersons, and others both in the US and abroad, and this course is especially designed to keep professionals fully, globally informed and add to their credentials for international work. Prerequisites: CEEN592. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN611. MULTIPHASE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with ESGN622,
Principles of multiphase and multicomponent flow and transport are applied to contaminant transport in the unsaturated and saturated zones. Focus is on immiscible phase, dissolved phase, and vapor phase transport of low solubility organic contaminants in soils and aquifer materials. Topics discussed include: capillarity, interphase mass transfer, modeling, and remediation technologies. Prerequisites: CEEN550 or equivalent, CEEN580 or CEEN584 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CEEN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once, but no more than twice for the same course content. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit: 0 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CEEN699. ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit: 0.5 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different topics/experience and maximums vary by department. Contact the Department for credit limits toward the degree.

CEEN707. GRADUATE THESIS / DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT. 1-15 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with EGGN707C,ESGN707,
(I, II, S) GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the direct supervision of the student's faculty advisor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeatable for credit.