ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (EENG)

EENG198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

EENG199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: "Independent Study" form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

EENG281. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS, ELECTRONICS AND POWER. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with DCGN381,EGGN281,EGGN381,
(I, II) This course provides an engineering science analysis of electrical circuits. DC and single-phase AC networks are presented. Transient analysis of RC, RL, and RLC circuits is studied as is the analysis of circuits in sinusoidal steady-state using phasor concepts. The following topics are included: DC and single-phase AC circuit analysis, current and charge relationships. Ohm?s Law, resistors, inductors, capacitors, equivalent resistance and impedance, Kirchhoff?s Laws, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition and source transformation, power and energy, maximum power transfer, first order transient response, algebra of complex numbers, phasor representation, time domain and frequency domain concepts, and ideal transformers. The course features PSPICE, a commercial circuit analysis software package. May not also receive credit for EENG282. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG282. ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

(I,II) This course provides an engineering science analysis of electrical circuits. DC and AC (single-phase and three-phase) networks are presented. Transient analysis of RC and RL circuits is studied as is the analysis of circuits in sinusoidal steady-state using phasor concepts. The following topics are included: DC and AC circuit analysis, current and charge relationships. Ohm's Law, resistors, inductors, capacitors, equivalent resistance and impedance, Kirchhoff's Laws, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition and source transformation, power and energy, maximum power transfer, first order transient response, algebra of complex numbers, phasor representation, time domain and frequency domain concepts, and steady-state analysis of single-phase and three-phase ac power circuits. May not also receive credit for EENG281. Prerequisites: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

EENG284. DIGITAL LOGIC. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN284,EGGN384,
(I, II) Fundamentals of digital logic design. Covers combinational and sequential logic circuits, programmable logic devices, hardware description languages, and computer-aided design (CAD) tools. Laboratory component introduces simulation and synthesis software and hands-on hardware design. Prerequisites: CSCI261. Co-requisites: EENG282 or EENG281 or PHGN215. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

EENG298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

EENG299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: "Independent Study" form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

EENG307. INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN307,EGGN407,
(I, II) System modeling through an energy flow approach is presented, with examples from linear electrical, mechanical, fluid and/or thermal systems. Analysis of system response in both the time domain and frequency domain is discussed in detail. Feedback control design techniques, including PID, are analyzed using both analytical and computational methods. Prerequisites: EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215, and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG310. INFORMATION SYSTEMS SCIENCE I. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EENG388,EGGN388,
(I, II) The interpretation, representation and analysis of time-varying phenomena as signals which convey information and noise; applications are drawn from filtering, audio and image processing, and communications. Topics include convolution, Fourier series and transforms, sampling and discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals, modulation, and z-transforms. Prerequisites: (EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215) and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour recitation, 4 semester hours.

EENG311. INFORMATION SYSTEMS SCIENCE II. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I,II) This course covers signals and noise in electrical systems. Topics covered include information theory, signal to noise ratio, random variables, probability density functions, statistics, noise, matched filters, coding and entropy, power spectral density, and bit error rate. Applications are taken from radar, communications systems, and signal processing. Prerequisite: EENG310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG334. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, ELECTRICAL. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN334,
(S) Experience in the engineering design process involving analysis, design, and simulation. Students use engineering, mathematics and computers to model, analyze, design and evaluate system performance. Teamwork emphasized. Prerequisites: EENG284 (C- or better), EENG385 and EENG389. Three weeks in summer session; 3 semester hours.

EENG340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN340,EGGN340E,
(I,II,S) Supervised, full-time engineering related employment for a continuous six-month period in which specific educational objectives are achieved. Students must meet with the Department Head prior to enrolling to clarify the educational objectives for their individual Co-op program. Prerequisites: Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00. 3 semester hours credit will be granted once toward degree requirements. Credit earned in EENG340, Cooperative Education, may be used as free elective credit hours if, in the judgment of the Department Head, the required term paper adequately documents the fact that the work experience entailed high-quality application of engineering principles and practice. Applying the credits as free electives requires the student to submit a Declaration of Intent to Request Approval to Apply Co-op Credit toward Graduation Requirements form obtained from the Career Center to the Department Head.

EENG383. MICROCOMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND INTERFACING. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN383,EGGN482,
(I, II) Microprocessor and microcontroller architecture focusing on hardware structures and elementary machine and assembly language programming skills essential for use of microprocessors in data acquisition, control, and instrumentation systems. Analog and digital signal conditioning, communication, and processing. A/D and D/A converters for microprocessors. RS232 and other communication standards. Laboratory study and evaluation of microcomputer system; design and implementation of interfacing projects. Prerequisites: (EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215) and EENG284 or PHGN317. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

EENG385. ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND CIRCUITS. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN385,
(I, II) Semiconductor materials and characteristics, junction diode operation, bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors, biasing techniques, four layer devices, amplifier and power supply design, laboratory study of semiconductor circuit characteristics. Prerequisite: EENG307. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

EENG386. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING ELECTROMAGNETICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN386,
(I, II) This course provides an introduction to electromagnetic theory as applied to electrical engineering problems in wireless communications, transmission lines, and high-frequency circuit design. The theory and applications are based on Maxwell's equations, which describe the electric and magnetic force-fields, the interplay between them, and how they transport energy. Matlab and PSPICE will be used in homework assignments, to perform simulations of electromagnetic interference, electromagnetic energy propagation along transmission lines on printed circuit boards, and antenna radiation patterns. Prerequisites: EENG281 (C- or better) or EENG282 (C- or better), and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG389. FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRIC MACHINERY. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN389,
(I, II) This course provides an engineering analysis of electrical machines. The following topics are included: review of three-phase AC circuit analysis, magnetic circuit concepts and materials, transformer analysis and operation, modelling, steady-state analysis of rotating machines, synchronous and poly-phase induction motors, and DC machines and laboratory study of external characteristics of machines and transformers. Prerequisite: EENG281 (C- or better) or EENG282 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

EENG390. ENERGY, ELECTRICITY, RENEWABLE ENERGY, AND ELECTRIC POWER GRID. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) (WI) Fundamentals and primary sources of energy; Energy conversion; Comprehensive energy picture in USA and the world; Generation of electric power today; Understanding of the electric power grid and how it works; Renewable energy resources and distributed generation; Wind and PV power generation; Future trend in electricity delivery; Energy sustainability. Prerequisites: EENG281 or EENG282 or PHGN215. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG395. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research project for freshman, sophomores or juniors under direction of a member of the departmental faculty. Written report required for credit. Seniors should take EENG495 instead of EENG395. Repeatable for credit. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.

EENG398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

EENG399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: "Independent Study" form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

EENG411. DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN481,
(II) This course introduces the mathematical and engineering aspects of digital signal processing (DSP). An emphasis is placed on the various possible representations for discrete-time signals and systems (in the time, z-, and frequency domains) and how those representations can facilitate the identification of signal properties, the design of digital filters, and the sampling of continuous-time signals. Advanced topics include sigma-delta conversion techniques, multi-rate signal processing, and spectral analysis. The course will be useful to all students who are concerned with information bearing signals and signal processing in a wide variety of application settings, including sensing, instrumentation, control, communications, signal interpretation and diagnostics, and imaging. Prerequisite: EENG310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG413. ANALOG AND DIGITAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS. 4.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN483,
(II) Signal classification; Fourier transform; filtering; sampling; signal representation; modulation; demodulation; applications to broadcast, data transmission, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: EENG310. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

EENG417. MODERN CONTROL DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN417,
(I) Control system design with an emphasis on observer-based methods, from initial open-loop experiments to final implementation. The course begins with an overview of feedback control design technique from the frequency domain perspective, including sensitivity and fundamental limitations. State space realization theory is introduced, and system identification methods for parameter estimation are introduced. Computerbased methods for control system design are presented. Prerequisite: EENG307. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.

EENG421. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE PHYSICS AND DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course will explore the field of semiconductors and the technological breakthroughs which they have enabled. We will begin by investigating the physics of semiconductor materials, including a brief foray into quantum mechanics. Then, we will focus on understanding pn junctions in great detail, as this device will lead us to many others (bipolar transistors, LEDs, solar cells). We will explore these topics through a range of sources (textbooks, scientific literature, patents) and discuss the effects they have had on Western society. As time allows, we will conclude with topics of interest to the students (possibilities include quantum devices, MOSFETs, lasers, and integrated circuit fabrication techniques). Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG423. INTRODUCTION TO VLSI DESIGN. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This is an introductory course that will cover basic theories and techniques of digital VLSI (Very Large Scale Integrated Circuits) design and CMOS technology. The objective of this course is to understand the theory and design of digital systems at the transistor level. The course will cover MOS transistor theory, CMOS processing technology, techniques to design fast digital circuits, techniques to design power efficient circuits, standard CMOS fabrications processes, CMOS design rules, and static and dynamic logic structures. Prerequisites: EENG281 (C- or better) or EENG282 (C- or better), and EENG284 (C- or better). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG425. INTRODUCTION TO ANTENNAS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This course provides an introduction to antennas and antenna arrays. Theoretical analysis and use of computer programs for antenna analysis and design will be presented. Experimental tests and demonstrations will also be conducted to complement the theoretical analysis. Students are expected to use MATLAB to model antennas and their performance. Prerequisites: EENG386.

EENG427. WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) This course provides the tools needed to analyze and design a wireless system. Topics include link budgets, satellite communications, cellular communications, handsets, base stations, modulation techniques, RF propagation, coding, and diversity. Students are expected to complete an extensive final project. Prerequisites: EENG311 or MATH201 and EENG310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG428. COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROMAGNETICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course provides the basic formulation and numerical solution for static electric problems based on Laplace, Poisson and wave equations and for full wave electromagnetic problems based on Maxwell's equations. Variation principles methods, including the finite-element method and method of moments will be introduced. Field to circuit conversion will be discussed via the transmission line method. Numerical approximations based on the finite difference and finite difference frequency domain techniques will also be developed for solving practical problems. Prerequisite: EENG386. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG429. ACTIVE RF & MICROWAVE DEVICES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This course introduces the basics of active radio-frequency (RF) and microwave circuits and devices which are the building blocks of modern communication and radar systems. The topics that will be studied are RF and microwave circuit components, resonant circuits, matching networks, noise in active circuits, switches, RF and microwave transistors and amplifiers. Additionally, mixers, oscillators, transceiver architectures, RF and monolithic microwave integrated circuits (RFICs and MMICs) will be introduced. Moreover, students will learn how to model active devices using professional CAD software, how to fabricate printed active microwave devices, how a vector network analyzer (VNA) operates, and how to measure active RF and microwave devices using VNAs. Prerequisites: EENG385. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG430. PASSIVE RF & MICROWAVE DEVICES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course introduces the basics of passive radio-frequency (RF) and microwave circuits and devices which are the building blocks of modern communication and radar systems. The topics that will be studied are microwave transmission lines and waveguides, microwave network theory, microwave resonators, power dividers, directional couplers, hybrids, RF/microwave filters, and phase shifters. Students will also learn how to design and analyze passive microwave devices using professional CAD software. Moreover, students will learn how to fabricate printed passive microwave devices and test them using a vector network analyzer. Prerequisites: EENG386. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG437. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER VISION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) Computer vision is the process of using computers to acquire images, transform images, and extract symbolic descriptions from images. This course provides an introduction to this field, covering topics in image formation, feature extraction, location estimation, and object recognition. Design ability and hands-on projects will be emphasized, using popular software tools. The course will be of interest both to those who want to learn more about the subject and to those who just want to use computer imaging techniques. Prerequisites: MATH201 or EENG311, MATH332, CSCI261, Senior level standing. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG450. SYSTEMS EXPLORATION AND ENGINEERING DESIGN LAB. 1.0 Semester Hr.

(I, II) This laboratory is a semester-long design and build activity centered around a challenge problem that varies from year to year. Solving this problem requires the design and prototyping of a complex system and utilizes concepts from multiple electrical engineering courses. Students work in intra-disciplinary teams, with students focusing on either embedded systems or control systems. Prerequisites: EENG383 and EENG307. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

EENG470. INTRODUCTION TO HIGH POWER ELECTRONICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN485,
(I) Power electronics are used in a broad range of applications from control of power flow on major transmission lines to control of motor speeds in industrial facilities and electric vehicles, to computer power supplies. This course introduces the basic principles of analysis and design of circuits utilizing power electronics, including AC/DC, AC/AC, DC/DC, and DC/AC conversions in their many configurations. Prerequisite: EENG282. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG472. PRACTICAL DESIGN OF SMALL RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN486,
(Taught on Demand) This course provides the fundamentals to understand and analyze renewable energy powered electric circuits. It covers practical topics related to the design of alternative energy based systems. It is assumed the students will have some basic and broad knowledge of the principles of electrical machines, thermodynamics, electronics, and fundamentals of electric power systems. One of the main objectives of this course is to focus on the interdisciplinary aspects of integration of the alternative sources of energy, including hydropower, wind power, photovoltaic, and energy storage for those systems. Power electronic systems will be discussed and how those electronic systems can be used for stand-alone and grid-connected electrical energy applications. Prerequisite: EENG382. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG480. POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN484,
(I) 3-phase power systems, per-unit calculations, modeling and equivalent circuits of major components, voltage drop, fault calculations, symmetrical components and unsymmetrical faults, system grounding, power-flow, selection of major equipment, design of electric power distribution systems. Prerequisite: EENG389. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG481. ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED ENERGY SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN487,
(II) The course investigates the design, operation and analysis of complex interconnected electric power grids, the basis of our electric power infrastructure. Evaluating the system operation, planning for the future expansion under deregulation and restructuring, ensuring system reliability, maintaining security, and developing systems that are safe to operate has become increasingly more difficult. Because of the complexity of the problems encountered, analysis and design procedures rely on the use of sophisticated power system simulation computer programs. The course features some commonly used commercial software packages. Prerequisites: EENG480. 2 Lecture Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours, 3 Semester Hours.

EENG486. ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND WAVES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course provides an introduction to electromagnetic fields and waves and their applications in antennas, radar, high-frequency electronics, and microwave devices. The time-varying form of electromagnetic fields and the use of sinusoidal time sources to create time-harmonic electromagnetic fields will be covered first, followed by coverage of plane electromagnetic waves formulation and reflection and transmission from different surfaces. Finally, the application of guided electromagnetic waves will be covered through the study of transmission lines, waveguides, and their applications in microwave systems. Prerequisite: EENG386. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG489. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN ENERGY SYSTEMS AND POWER ELECTRONICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) The course presents a unified approach for understanding and applying computational methods, computer-aided analysis and design of electric power systems. Applications will range from power electronics to power systems, power quality, and renewable energy. Focus will be on how these seemingly diverse applications all fit within the smart-grid paradigm. This course builds on background knowledge of electric circuits, control of dc/dc converters and inverters, energy conversion and power electronics by preparing students in applying the computational methods for multi-domain simulation of energy systems and power electronics engineering problems. Prerequisites: EENG282 or EENG382. 1 hour lecture, 2 lab hours, 3 semester hours.

EENG495. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research project under direction of a member of the departmental faculty. Written report required for credit. Prerequisites: senior-level standing based on credit hours. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

EENG498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

EENG499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: "Independent Study" form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

EENG499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: "Independent Study" form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

EENG504. ENGINEERING SYSTEMS SEMINAR - ELECTRICAL. 1.0 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with EGGN504E,
(I, II) This is a seminar forum for graduate students to present their research projects, critique others? presentations, understand the breadth of engineering projects both within their specialty area and across the Division, hear from leaders of industry about contemporary engineering as well as socio-economical and marketing issues facing today?s competitive global environment. In order to improve communication skills, each student is required to present a seminar in this course before his/her graduation from the Engineering graduate program. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1 hour seminar, 1 semester hour. Repeatable; maximum 1 hour granted toward degree requirements.

EENG507. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER VISION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CSCI507,CSCI512,EENG512,EGGN512,
(I) Computer vision is the process of using computers to acquire images, transform images, and extract symbolic descriptions from images. This course provides an introduction to this field, covering topics in image formation, feature extraction, location estimation, and object recognition. Design ability and hands-on projects will be emphasized, using popular software tools. The course will be of interest both to those who want to learn more about the subject and to those who just want to use computer imaging techniques. Prerequisites: Undergraduate level knowledge of linear algebra, statistics, and a programming language. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG508. ADVANCED TOPICS IN PERCEPTION AND COMPUTER VISION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with CSCI508,
(II) This course covers advanced topics in perception and computer vision, emphasizing research advances in the field. The course focuses on structure and motion estimation, general object detection and recognition, and tracking. Projects will be emphasized, using popular software tools. Prerequisites: EENG507 or CSCI507. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG509. SPARSE SIGNAL PROCESSING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN509,
(II) This course presents a mathematical tour of sparse signal representations and their applications in modern signal processing. The classical Fourier transform and traditional digital signal processing techniques are extended to enable various types of computational harmonic analysis. Topics covered include time-frequency and wavelet analysis, filter banks, nonlinear approximation of functions, compression, signal restoration, and compressive sensing. Prerequisites: EENG411 and EENG515. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG511. CONVEX OPTIMIZATION AND ITS ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) The course focuses on recognizing and solving convex optimization problems that arise in applications in various engineering fields. Covered topics include basic convex analysis, conic programming, duality theory, unconstrained optimization, and constrained optimization. The application part covers problems in signal processing, power and energy, machine learning, control and mechanical engineering, and other fields, with an emphasis on modeling and solving these problems using the CVX package. Offered Spring semester of even years. Prerequisites: EENG311 and EENG511. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG515. MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN515,
(I) An introduction to mathematical methods for modern signal processing using vector space methods. Topics include signal representation in Hilbert and Banach spaces; linear operators and the geometry of linear equations; LU, Cholesky, QR, eigen- and singular value decompositions. Applications to signal processing and linear systems are included throughout, such as Fourier analysis, wavelets, adaptive filtering, signal detection, and feedback control.

EENG517. THEORY AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN517,
(II) This course will introduce and study the theory and design of multivariable and nonlinear control systems. Students will learn to design multivariable controllers that are both optimal and robust, using tools such as state space and transfer matrix models, nonlinear analysis, optimal estimator and controller design, and multi-loop controller synthesis. Spring semester of even years. Prerequisites: EENG417. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG519. ESTIMATION THEORY AND KALMAN FILTERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN519,
(II) Estimation theory considers the extraction of useful information from raw sensor measurements in the presence of signal uncertainty. Common applications include navigation, localization and mapping, but applications can be found in all fields where measurements are used. Mathematic descriptions of random signals and the response of linear systems are presented. The discrete-time Kalman Filter is introduced, and conditions for optimality are described. Implementation issues, performance prediction, and filter divergence are discussed. Adaptive estimation and nonlinear estimation are also covered. Contemporary applications will be utilized throughout the course. Offered spring semester of odd years. Prerequisites: EENG515 and undergraduate knowledge of probability theory. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG525. ANTENNAS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II) This course provides an in depth introduction to the analysis and synthesis of antennas and antenna arrays. Students are expected to use MATLAB to model antennas and their performance. An extensive final project that involves experimental or computer demonstrations is required. EENG525 has more depth and required work than EENG425. EENG525 students will have one additional problem for each homework assignment, one additional problem on exam, more difficult paper to review and present, and higher expectations on antenna and direction finding projects. Prerequisites: EGGN386 or GPGN302 or PHGN384. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG526. ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) In this course the fundamental theorems of electromagnetics are developed rigorously. Wave solutions are developed in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinate systems for bounded and unbounded regions. Prerequisite: EENG386. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG527. WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EENG513,EGGN513,
(I, II) This course provides the tools needed to analyze and design a wireless system. Topics include link budgets, satellite communications, cellular communications, handsets, base stations, modulation techniques, RF propagation, coding, and diversity. Students are expected to complete an extensive final project. EENG527 has more depth and required work than EENG427. EENG527 students will have one additional problem for each homework assignment, one additional problem on exam, more difficult paper to review and present, and higher expectations on final project. Prerequisites: EENG386, EENG311, and EENG388. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

EENG528. COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROMAGNETICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course provides the basic formulation and numerical solution for static electric problems based on Laplace, Poisson and wave equations and for full wave electromagnetic problems based on Maxwell?s equations. Variation principles methods, including the finite-element method and method of moments will be introduced. Field to circuit conversion will be discussed via the transmission line method. Numerical approximations based on the finite difference and finite difference frequency domain techniques will also be developed for solving practical problems. Prerequisite: EENG386. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG529. ACTIVE RF & MICROWAVE DEVICES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This course introduces the basics of active radio-frequency (RF) and microwave circuits and devices which are the building blocks of modern communication and radar systems. The topics that will be studied are RF and microwave circuit components, resonant circuits, matching networks, noise in active circuits, switches, RF and microwave transistors and amplifiers. Additionally, mixers, oscillators, transceiver architectures, RF and monolithic microwave integrated circuits (RFICs and MMICs) will be introduced. Moreover, students will learn how to model active devices using professional CAD software, how to fabricate printed active microwave devices, how a vector network analyzer (VNA) operates, and how to measure active RF and microwave devices using VNAs. Prerequisites: EEBG385. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG530. PASSIVE RF & MICROWAVE DEVICES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(I) This course introduces the basics of passive radio-frequency (RF) and microwave circuits and devices which are the building blocks of modern communication and radar systems. The topics that will be studied are microwave transmission lines and waveguides, microwave network theory, microwave resonators, power dividers, directional couplers, hybrids, RF/microwave filters, and phase shifters. Students will also learn how to design and analyze passive microwave devices using professional CAD software. Moreover, students will learn how to fabricate printed passive microwave devices and test them using a vector network analyzer. Prerequisites: EENG386. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG570. ADVANCED HIGH POWER ELECTRONICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN585,
(I) Basic principles of analysis and design of circuits utilizing high power electronics. AC/DC, DC/AC, AC/AC, and DC/DC conversion techniques. Laboratory project comprising simulation and construction of a power electronics circuit. Prerequisites: EENG385; EENG389 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall semester even years.

EENG571. MODERN ADJUSTABLE SPEED ELECTRIC DRIVES. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN581,
An introduction to electric drive systems for advanced applications. The course introduces the treatment of vector control of induction and synchronous motor drives using the concepts of general flux orientation and the feedforward (indirect) and feedback (direct) voltage and current vector control. AC models in space vector complex algebra are also developed. Other types of drives are also covered, such as reluctance, stepper-motor and switched-reluctance drives. Digital computer simulations are used to evaluate such implementations. Pre-requisite: Familiarity with power electronics and power systems, such as covered in EENG480 and EENG470. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Spring semester of even years.

EENG572. RENEWABLE ENERGY AND DISTRIBUTED GENERATION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN582,
A comprehensive electrical engineering approach on the integration of alternative sources of energy. One of the main objectives of this course is to focus on the inter-disciplinary aspects of integration of the alternative sources of energy which will include most common and also promising types of alternative primary energy: hydropower, wind power, photovoltaic, fuel cells and energy storage with the integration to the electric grid. Pre-requisite: It is assumed that students will have some basic and broad knowledge of the principles of electrical machines, thermodynamics, power electronics, direct energy conversion, and fundamentals of electric power systems such as covered in basic engineering courses plus EENG480 and EENG470. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Fall semester of odd years.

EENG573. ELECTRIC POWER QUALITY. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN580,
(II) Electric power quality (PQ) deals with problems exhibited by voltage, current and frequency that typically impact end-users (customers) of an electric power system. This course is designed to familiarize the concepts of voltage sags, harmonics, momentary disruptions, and waveform distortions arising from various sources in the system. A theoretical and mathematical basis for various indices, standards, models, analyses techniques, and good design procedures will be presented. Additionally, sources of power quality problems and some remedies for improvement will be discussed. The course bridges topics between power systems and power electronics. Prerequisite: EENG480 and EENG470. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.

EENG580. POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN584,
This course deals with the theory and applications of problems and solutions as related to electric power distribution systems engineering from both ends: end-users like large industrial plants and electric utility companies. The primary focus of this course in on the medium voltage (4.16 kV ? 69 kV) power systems. Some references will be made to the LV power system. The course includes per-unit methods of calculations; voltage drop and voltage regulation; power factor improvement and shunt compensation; short circuit calculations; theory and fundamentals of symmetrical components; unsymmetrical faults; overhead distribution lines and power cables; basics and fundamentals of distribution protection. Prerequisites: EENG480 or equivalent. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Fall semester of odd years.

EENG581. POWER SYSTEM OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN587,
(I) This course presents a comprehensive exposition of the theory, methods, and algorithms for Energy Management Systems (EMS) in the power grid. It will focus on (1) modeling of power systems and generation units, (2) methods for dispatching generating resources, (3) methods for accurately estimating the state of the system, (4) methods for assessing the security of the power system, and (5) an overview of the market operations in the grid. Prerequisite: EENG480. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.

EENG582. HIGH VOLTAGE AC AND DC POWER TRANSMISSION. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN586,
This course deals with the theory, modeling and applications of HV and EHV power transmission systems engineering. The primary focus is on overhead AC transmission line and voltage ranges between 115 kV ? 500 kV. HVDC and underground transmission will also be discussed. The details include the calculations of line parameters (RLC); steady-state performance evaluation (voltage drop and regulation, losses and efficiency) of short, medium and long lines; reactive power compensation; FACTS devices; insulation coordination; corona; insulators; sag-tension calculations; EMTP, traveling wave and transients; fundamentals of transmission line design; HV and EHV power cables: solid dielectric, oil-filled and gas-filled; Fundamentals of DC transmission systems including converter and filter. Prerequisites: EENG480 or equivalent. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Fall semester of even years.

EENG583. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL MACHINE DYNAMICS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN583,
This course deals primarily with the two rotating AC machines currently utilized in the electric power industry, namely induction and synchronous machines. The course is divided in two halves: the first half is dedicated to induction and synchronous machines are taught in the second half. The details include the development of the theory of operation, equivalent circuit models for both steady-state and transient operations, all aspects of performance evaluation, IEEE methods of testing, and guidelines for industry applications including design and procurement. Prerequisites: EENG480 or equivalent. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Spring semester of even years.

EENG584. POWER SYSTEM RISK MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

(II) This course presents a comprehensive exposition of the theory, methods, and algorithms for risk management in the power grid. The course will focus on: (1) power system stability analysis (steady state, dynamic, and transient), (2) analysis of internal and external threats to power systems, e.g. component failures, faults, natural hazards, cyber intrusions, (3) introduction to power system security assessment, (4) fundamentals of modeling risk, vulnerability assessment and loss calculations, (5) mitigating techniques before, during and after the course of major events and disturbances. Prerequisites: EENG480, EENG481. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Years to be Offered: Every Other Year.

EENG586. COMMUNICATION NETWORKS FOR POWER SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Advanced topics on communication networks for power systems including the fundamentals of communication engineering and signal modulation/transfer, physical layer for data transfer (e.g., wireline, wireless, fiber optics), different communication topologies for power networks (e.g., client-server, peer-to-peer), fundamentals of SCADA system, data modeling and communication services for power system applications, common protocols for utility and substation automation, and cyber-security in power networks. Prerequisites: EENG480. 3 hours of lecture; 3 credit hours. Fall, odd years.

EENG587. POWER SYSTEMS PROTECTION AND RELAYING. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Theory and practice of power system protection and relaying; Study of power system faults and symmetrical components; Fundamental principles and tools for system modeling and analysis pertaining to relaying, and industry practices in the protection of lines, transformers, generators, motors, and industrial power systems; Introduction to microprocessor based relaying, control, and SCADA. Prerequisites: EENG389. 3 hours of lecture; 3 credit hours. Spring, odd years.

EENG588. ENERGY POLICY, RESTRUCTURING AND DEREGULATION OF ELECTRICITY MARKET. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

The big picture of electric power, electricity and energy industry; Restructuring and Deregulation of electricity market; Energy Policy Acts and its impact on electricity market and pricing; Energy economics and pricing strategy; Public policy issues, reliability and security; Regulation. Prerequisites: EENG389. 3 hours of lecture; 3 credit hours. Fall, odd years.

EENG589. DESIGN AND CONTROL OF WIND ENERGY SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN589,
(II) Wind energy provides a clean, renewable source for electricity generation. Wind turbines provide electricity at or near the cost of traditional fossil-fuel fired power plants at suitable locations, and the wind industry is growing rapidly as a result. Engineering R&D can still help to reduce the cost of energy from wind, improve the reliability of wind turbines and wind farms, and help to improve acceptance of wind energy in the public and political arenas. This course will provide an overview of the design and control of wind energy systems. Offered Spring semester of odd years. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

EENG598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once, but no more than twice for the same course content. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit: 0 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

EENG599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit: 0.5 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different topics/experience and maximums vary by department. Contact the Department for credit limits toward the degree.

EENG617. INTELLIGENT CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN617,
Fundamental issues related to the design on intelligent control systems are described. Neural networks analysis for engi neering systems are presented. Neural-based learning, estimation, and identification of dynamical systems are described. Qualitative control system analysis using fuzzy logic is presented. Fuzzy mathematics design of rule-based control, and integrated human-machine intelligent control systems are covered. Real-life problems from different engineering systems are analyzed. Prerequisite: EENG517. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Taught on demand.

EENG618. NONLINEAR AND ADAPTIVE CONTROL. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN618,
This course presents a comprehensive exposition of the theory of nonlinear dynamical systems and the applications of this theory to adaptive control. It will focus on (1) methods of characterizing and understanding the behavior of systems that can be described by nonlinear ordinary differential equations, (2) methods for designing controllers for such systems, (3) an introduction to the topic of system identification, and (4) study of the primary techniques in adaptive control, including model-reference adaptive control and model predictive control. Prerequisite: EENG517. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring, even numbered years.

EENG683. COMPUTER METHODS IN ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS. 3.0 Semester Hrs.

Equivalent with EGGN583,
This course deals with the computer methods and numerical solution techniques applied to large scale power systems. Primary focus includes load flow, short circuit, voltage stability and transient stability studies and contingency analysis. The details include the modeling of various devices like transformer, transmission lines, FACTS devices, and synchronous machines. Numerical techniques include solving a large set of linear or non-linear algebraic equations, and solving a large set of differential equations. A number of simple case studies (as per IEEE standard models) will be performed. Prerequisites: EENG583, EENG580 and EENG582 or equivalent; a strong knowledge of digital simulation techniques. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Taught on demand.

EENG698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 6.0 Semester Hrs.

(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once, but no more than twice for the same course content. Prerequisite: none. Variable credit: 0 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

EENG699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Semester Hr.

(I, II, S) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit: 0.5 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different topics/experience and maximums vary by department. Contact the Department for credit limits toward the degree.

EENG707. GRADUATE THESIS / DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT. 1-15 Semester Hr.

Equivalent with EGGN707E,
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the direct supervision of the student's faculty advisor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeatable for credit.