Materials Science

2017-2018

Degrees Offered

  • Master of Science (Materials Science; thesis option or non-thesis option)
  • Doctor of Philosophy (Materials Science)

Program Description

The interdisciplinary graduate program in Materials Science exists to educate students, with at least a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering or science, in the diverse field of Materials Science. This diversity includes the four key foundational aspects of Materials Science – materials properties including characterization and modeling, materials structures, materials synthesis and processing and materials performance – as applied to materials of a variety of types (i.e., metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials and biomaterials). The Materials Science graduate program is responsible for administering MS (thesis and non-thesis) and PhD Degrees in Materials Science.

The Departments of Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering,  Physics, and Chemical and Biological Engineering jointly administer the interdisciplinary materials science program. This interdisciplinary degree program coexists along side strong disciplinary programs, in Chemistry, Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, and Physics.  For administrative purposes, the student will reside in the advisor’s home academic department. The student’s graduate committee will have final approval of the course of study.

Fields of Research

  • Advanced polymeric materials
  • Alloy theory, concurrent design, theory-assisted materials engineering, and electronic structure theory
  • Applications of artificial intelligence techniques to materials processing and manufacturing, neural networks for process modeling and sensor data processing, manufacturing process control
  • Atomic scale characterization
  • Atom Probe Tomography
  • Biomaterials
  • Ceramic processing, modeling of ceramic processing
  • Characterization, thermal stability, and thermal degradation mechanisms of polymers
  • Chemical and physical processing of materials, engineered materials, materials synthesis
  • Chemical vapor deposition
  • Coating materials and applications
  • Computational condensed-matter physics, semiconductor alloys, first-principles phonon calculations
  • Computer modeling and simulation
  • Control systems engineering, artificial neural systems for senior data processing, polymer cure monitoring sensors, process monitoring and control for composites manufacturing
  • Crystal and molecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography
  • Electrodeposition
  • Electron and ion microscopy
  • Experimental condensed-matter physics, thermal and electrical properties of materials, superconductivity, photovoltaics
  • Fuel cell materials
  • Fullerene synthesis, combustion chemistry
  • Heterogeneous catalysis, reformulated and alcohol fuels, surface analysis, electrophotography
  • High temperature ceramics
  • Intelligent automated systems, intelligent process control, robotics, artificial neural systems
  • Materials synthesis, interfaces, flocculation, fine particles
  • Mathematical modeling of material processes
  • Mechanical metallurgy, failure analysis, deformation of materials, advanced steel coatings
  • Mechanical properties of ceramics and ceramic composites
  • High entropy alloys
  • Mössbauer spectroscopy, ion implantation, small-angle X-ray scattering, semiconductor defects
  • Nano materials
  • Non-destructive evaluation
  • Non-ferrous structural alloys
  • Novel separation processes: membranes, catalytic membrane reactors, biopolymer adsorbents for heavy metal remediation of ground surface water
  • Numerical modeling of particulate media, thermomechanical analysis
  • Optical properties of materials and interfaces
  • Phase transformations and mechanisms of microstructural change
  • Photovoltaic materials and device processing
  • Physical metallurgy, ferrous and nonferrous alloy systems
  • Physical vapor deposition, thin films, coatings
  • Power electronics, plasma physics, pulsed power, plasma material processing
  • Processing and characterization of electroceramics (ferro-electrics, piezoelectrics, pyroelectrics, and dielectrics)
  • Semiconductor materials and device processing
  • Soft materials
  • Solidification and near net shape processing
  • Surface physics, epitaxial growth, interfacial science, adsorption
  • Transport phenomena and mathematical modeling
  • Weld metallurgy, materials joining processes
  • Welding and joining science

Professors

John R. Berger, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Cristian Ciobanu, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Mark Eberhart, Department of Chemistry

Michael J. Kaufman, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Dean of CASE

Daniel M. Knauss, Department of Chemistry

Stephen Liu , Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, American Bureau of Shipping Endowed Chair of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Ryan P. O'Hayre, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Materials Science Program Director

Ivar E. Reimanis, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Herman F. Coors Distinguished Professor of Ceramic Engineering

Ryan Richards, Department of Chemistry

P. Craig Taylor, Department of Physics

Colin Wolden , Department of Chemical Engineering, Weaver Distinguished Professor

Kim Williams, Department of Chemistry

Associate Professors

Stephen G. Boyes, Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry

Brian P. Gorman, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Timothy R. Ohno, Department of Physics

Alan Sellinger, Department of Chemistry

Neal Sullivan, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Assistant Professors

Geoff L. Brennecka, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Corinne E. Packard, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Svitlana Pylypenko, Department of Chemistry

Aaron Stebner, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Eric Toberer, Department of Physics

Shubham Vyas, Department of Chemistry

Yongan Yang, Department of Chemistry

Professors Emeriti

Thomas E. Furtak, Department of Physics

John Moore, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Denis W. Readey, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University Professor-Emeritus

Chester J. Van Tyne, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Teaching Associate Professor

Gerald Bourne, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Research Professors

Richard K. Ahrenkiel, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

William (Grover) Coors, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Research Associate Professor

James E. Bernard, Department of Physics

Research Assistant Professors

David Diercks, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Jianliang Lin, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Program Requirements

Each of the three degree programs (non-thesis MS, thesis-based MS, and PhD) require the successful completion of three core courses for a total of 9 credit hours that will be applied to the degree program course requirements. Depending upon the individual student's background, waivers for these courses may be approved by the program director. In order to gain a truly interdisciplinary understanding of Materials Science, students in the program are encouraged to select elective courses from several different departments outside of the Materials Science program. Course selection should be completed in consultation with the student's advisor or program director as appropriate.

Listed below are the three required Materials Science core courses:

MLGN591MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS3.0
MLGN592ADVANCED MATERIALS KINETICS AND TRANSPORT3.0
MLGN593BONDING, STRUCTURE, AND CRYSTALLOGRAPHY3.0
Total Semester Hrs9.0

Master of Science (Thesis Option)

The Master of Science degree requires a minimum of 30.0 semester hours of acceptable coursework and thesis research credits (see table below). The student must also submit a thesis and pass the Defense of Thesis examination before the Thesis Committee.

COURSEWORK Materials Science Courses *18.0
MLGN707 Thesis Research Credits12.0
Total Semester Hrs30.0
*

 Must include 9.0 credit hours of core courses.

Master of Science (Non-Thesis Option with a case study)

The Master of Science degree requires a minimum of 30.0 semester hours of acceptable course work and case study credit including:

COURSEWORK Materials Science Courses *24.0
MLGN Case Study6.0
Total Semester Hrs30.0
*

 Must include 9.0 credit hours of core courses.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires a minimum of 72.0 hours of course and research credit including:

COURSEWORK Materials Science Courses (minimum) *24.0
MLGN707 Thesis Research Credits (minimum)24.0
*

 Must include 9.0 credit hours of core courses.

A minimum of 15 course credits earned at CSM is required for the PhD degree. In exceptional cases, this 15 CSM course credit hour requirement can be reduced in part or in full through the written consent of the student's advisor, program director, and thesis committee.

Deficiency Courses

All doctoral candidates must complete at least 6 credit hours of background courses. This course requirement is individualized for each candidate, depending on previous experience and research activities to be pursued. Competitive candidates may already possess this background information. In these cases, the candidate’s Thesis Committee may award credit for previous experience. In cases where additional coursework is required as part of a student’s program, these courses are treated as fulfilling a deficiency requirement that is beyond the total institutional requirement of 72 credit hours.

PhD Qualifying Process

The following constitutes the qualifying processes by which doctoral students are admitted to candidacy in the Materials Science program.

Core Curriculum – The three required core classes must be completed in the first full academic year for all doctoral candidates. Students must obtain a grade of B- or better in each class to be eligible to take the qualifying examination at the end of the succeeding spring semester. If not allowed to complete the qualifying examination at the end of the spring semester, students will be discouraged from the PhD program and encouraged, rather, to finish with a Masters degree

PhD Qualifying Examination – A qualifying examination is given annually at the end of the spring semester under the direction of the Materials Science Graduate Affairs Committee. All first-year Materials Science PhD students are expected to successfully complete the qualifying examination to remain in good standing in the program. The examination covers material from the core curriculum plus a standard introductory text on Materials Science, such as "Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction", by William Callister.  If a student performs below the expectations of the Materials Science faculty on the written exam, they will be asked to complete a follow-up oral examination in the summer semester.  The oral examination will be based on topics deemed to be deficient in the written examination.  Satisfactorily completing the oral exam will allow the student to proceed with the PhD program.  Students who perform below the expectations of the Materials Science faculty on the oral exam will not be allowed to continue with the PhD program.

PhD Thesis Proposal – A student’s PhD thesis committee administers a PhD Thesis Proposal defense. The PhD proposal defense should occur no later than the student's fourth semester. While the proposal itself should focus on the central topic of a student’s research efforts, during the proposal defense, candidates may expect to receive a wide range of questions from the Committee. This would include all manner of questions directly related to the proposal. Candidates, however, should also expect questions related to the major concept areas of Materials Science within the context of a candidate's research focus. The Committee formally reports results of the PhD proposal defense to the Materials Science Program Director using the Committee Reporting form developed by the Office of Graduate Studies.

Upon completion of these steps and upon completion of all required coursework, candidates are admitted to candidacy.

Following successful completion of coursework and the PhD qualifying process, candidates must also submit a thesis and successfully complete the PhD Defense of Thesis examination before the PhD Thesis Committee.

MLGN500PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE, AND PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS3.0
MLGN501STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS3.0
MLGN502SOLID STATE PHYSICS3.0
MLGN503CHEMICAL BONDING IN MATERIALS3.0
MLGN504SOLID STATE THERMODYNAMICS3.0
MLGN505MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS3.0
MLGN506TRANSPORT IN SOLIDS3.0
MLGN509SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY3.0
MLGN510SURFACE CHEMISTRY3.0
MLGN511KINETIC CONCERNS IN MATERIALS PROCESSING I3.0
MLGN512CERAMIC ENGINEERING3.0
MLGN513PROBLEM SOLVING IN MATERIALS SCIENCE3.0
MLGN515ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS3.0
MLGN516PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS3.0
MLGN517SOLID MECHANICS OF MATERIALS3.0
MLGN518PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN CERAMICS SYSTEMS3.0
MLGN519NON-CRYSTALLINE MATERIALS3.0
MLGN521KINETIC CONCERNS IN MATERIAL PROCESSING II3.0
MLGN523APPLIED SURFACE AND SOLUTION CHEMISTRY3.0
MLGN526GEL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY3.0
MLGN530INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER SCIENCE3.0
MLGN531POLYMER ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY3.0
MLGN535INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS PROCESSING LABORATORY3.0
MLGN536ADVANCED POLYMER SYNTHESIS3.0
MLGN544PROCESSING OF CERAMICS3.0
MLGN550STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS3.0
MLGN552INORGANIC MATRIX COMPOSITES3.0
MLGN555POLYMER AND COMPLEX FLUIDS COLLOQUIUM1.0
MLGN561TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS PROCESSING3.0
MLGN563POLYMER ENGINEERING: STRUCTURE, PROPERTIES AND PROCESSING3.0
MLGN565MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS AND COMPOSITES3.0
MLGN569FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY3.0
MLGN570BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MATERIALS3.0
MLGN572BIOMATERIALS3.0
MLGN583PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS OF SURFACE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES3.0
MLGN589MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS3.0
MLGN591MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS3.0
MLGN592ADVANCED MATERIALS KINETICS AND TRANSPORT3.0
MLGN593BONDING, STRUCTURE, AND CRYSTALLOGRAPHY3.0
MLGN607CONDENSED MATTER3.0
MLGN625MOLECULAR SIMULATION METHODS3.0
MLGN634ADVANCED TOPICS IN THERMODYNAMICS3.0
MLGN635POLYMER REACTION ENGINEERING3.0
MLGN648CONDENSED MATTER II3.0
MLGN673STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF POLYMERS3.0
MLGN696VAPOR DEPOSITION PROCESSES3.0
MLGN707GRADUATE THESIS / DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT1-15